Volume 64 - Number 3 - Fall 1998

K. Demographic and Economic Interrelations and Natural Resources

Studies concerned with the relations between population factors as a whole and economic aspects. Relations affecting a single demographic variable and economic factors are coded under the variable concerned and cross-referenced to this division, if appropriate.

K.1. Economic Development and Population

Studies concerned equally with economic and social development. Most studies on the microeconomics of the family will be found in G.2. Family and Household and cross-referenced to this division, if appropriate.

K.1.1. General Economic Development and Population

Studies on economic and social development with a worldwide emphasis, together with those with no geographical emphasis.

64:30655 Schultz, T. Paul. Human capital, schooling and health. In: International Population Conference/Congrès International de la Population: Beijing, 1997, Volume 3. 1997. 1,499-515 pp. International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
"A consensus has been forged in the last decade that recent periods of sustained growth in total factor productivity and reduced poverty are closely associated with improvements in a population's child nutrition, adult health, and schooling, particularly in low-income countries. Estimates of the productive returns from these three forms of human capital investment are nonetheless qualified by a number of limitations in our data and analytical methods. This paper reviews the problems that occupy researchers in this field and summarises accumulating evidence of empirical regularities."
Correspondence: T. P. Schultz, Yale University, Box 1987, Yale Station, 277 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30656 Williamson, Jeffrey G. Growth, distribution and demography: some lessons from history. NBER Working Paper, No. 6244, Oct 1997. 16, [27] pp. National Bureau of Economic Research [NBER]: Cambridge, Massachusetts. In Eng.
The author points out that the literature on empirical growth equations shows that it is unreasonable to expect unconditional convergence among all countries and at all times. He asks "first, why has it taken economists so long to learn the same lesson from the Kuznets Curve debate? No economist should expect an `unconditional' Kuznets Curve to emerge from the growth experience of all countries and at all times.... This paper assesses the role of globalization and demography via mass migrations. Second, why has it taken economists so long to learn that demography influences growth? When treated properly, demography can be shown to have a significant impact on GDP per capita growth. The answers to these two questions are sought by looking at inequality and growth experience in the Old World, the New World, and Asia over the last century and a half."
Correspondence: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138. Author's E-mail: jwilliam@kuznets.fas.harvard.edu. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

K.1.2. Developing Countries

General studies on the relations between population factors and economic development in developing countries. Includes studies on dependency as they relate to developing countries.

64:30657 Bloom, David E.; Williamson, Jeffrey G. Demographic transitions and economic miracles in emerging Asia. NBER Working Paper, No. 6268, Nov 1997. 24, [21] pp. National Bureau of Economic Research [NBER]: Cambridge, Massachusetts. In Eng.
"The demographic transition--a change from high to low rates of mortality and fertility--has been more dramatic in East Asia during this century than in any other region or historical period. By introducing demographic variables into an empirical model of economic growth, this essay shows that this transition has contributed substantially to East Asia's so-called economic miracle. The `miracle' occurred in part because East Asia's demographic transition resulted in its working-age population growing at a much faster pace than its dependent population during the period 1965-1990, thereby expanding the per capita productive capacity of East Asian economies."
Correspondence: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138. Author's E-mail: dbloom@hiid.harvard.edu. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

64:30658 Bryant, John. Communism, poverty, and demographic change in North Vietnam. Population and Development Review, Vol. 24, No. 2, Jun 1998. 235-69, 421, 424 pp. New York, New York. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"For about 30 years North Vietnam has had mortality and fertility rates near the world median, and a per capita income among the world's lowest.... North Vietnam acquired this unusual profile...in the years following its adoption of a communist development strategy. This article describes how the political and economic institutions that emerged during North Vietnam's communist period helped shape the economic and demographic outcomes. Market reforms during the 1980s and 1990s have been accompanied by continued mortality and fertility decline.... The article examines why mortality and fertility have continued to fall, despite continued low incomes and the introduction of a new set of institutions."
Correspondence: J. Bryant, Khon Kaen University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, 123 Friendship Highway, Amphoe Muang, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30659 Buccianti, Cinzia. Prospects and problems facing Sub-Saharan Africa: some preliminary observations. [Prospettive e problemi dell'Africa subsahariana: osservazioni preliminari.] Affari Sociali Internazionali, Vol. 23, No. 2, 1995. 123-42 pp. Milan, Italy. In Ita.
Using published data from UN and World Bank sources, the author analyzes current demographic trends in the countries of Sub-Saharan Africa. Data are presented on population size and density in 1992; and infant mortality, life expectancy, and fertility 1965-1995. The primary focus is on the prospects for effective socioeconomic development among Africa's poorest countries.
Location: New York Public Library, New York, NY.

64:30660 Coussy, Jean. Population and development. [Population et développement.] In: Démographie: analyse et synthèse. Causes et conséquences des évolutions démographiques, Volume 1. Sep 1997. 267-79 pp. Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento di Scienze Demografiche: Rome, Italy; Institut National d'Etudes Démographiques [INED]: Paris, France; Université Catholique de Louvain, Institut de Démographie, Département des Sciences de la Population et du Développement: Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. In Fre.
The origins of the debate on the relationship between population factors and socioeconomic development are reviewed, with particular reference to the situation in the least-developed countries. The author concludes that the inequalities that exist in the emerging global economic system have resulted in a new relationship between demographic and economic factors, and that it is no longer possible to analyze the relationship between population and development at the national level alone. The possibility of undertaking microeconomic studies on the demographic-economic relationship at the local level is discussed.
Correspondence: J. Coussy, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, 54 boulevard Raspail, 75006 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30661 Gupta, Kamla; Pandey, Arvind. Population and development in Uttar Pradesh. ISBN 81-7018-904-7. LC 97-901607. 1997. xvi, 495 pp. B. R. Publishing: Delhi, India. Distributed by D. K. Publishers Distributors (P), 1 Ansari Road, Darya Ganj, New Delhi 110 002, India. In Eng.
This is a collection of 36 papers presented at a national seminar on the population and development of the state of Uttar Pradesh, India. The seminar was organized jointly by the International Institute for Population Sciences in Mumbai and several other organizations in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, in December 1994. The papers are grouped under the following headings: Population and development, Nuptiality and fertility dynamics, Population policies and programmes, Mortality and health situation, and Population growth--environment and migration.
Correspondence: B. R. Publishing, A-6 Nimri Commercial Centre, Near Bharat Nagar, Ashok Vihar, Delhi 110 052, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30662 House, William J. Population growth and sustainable development: the case of the Solomon Islands. UNFPA Country Support Team Discussion Paper, No. 12, Jun 30, 1995. v, 37 pp. UNFPA Country Support Team [CST], Office for the South Pacific: Suva, Fiji. In Eng.
The author "examines the nature and patterns of recent demographic change in the Solomon Islands and, using the version of the RAPID computer model developed by the author for the country, explores the implications for the ability of the country to achieve sustainable social and economic development. [He] concludes by documenting the comprehensive set of recommendations made at a recent national Seminar which have been endorsed by the Cabinet and which are expected to form the basic framework of a revised National Population and Development Policy."
Correspondence: UNFPA/CST, P.O. Box 441, Suva, Fiji. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30663 Lefranc, Christophe; Mazouz, Mohammed; Aouragh, Lhaocine; Sari, Djilali; Chebab, Thamany; Boumghar, Ammar. Algerian society between population and development. [La société algérienne entre population et développement.] Les Documents et Manuels du CEPED, No. 8, ISBN 2-87762-112-X. Jul 1998. vii, 103 pp. Centre Français sur la Population et le Développement [CEPED]: Paris, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
These are the proceedings of a one-day meeting held May 23, 1996, in Paris on the relationship between population and development in Algeria. This monograph consists of five studies: Population, society, and development in Algeria: historical factors and current problems; Development planning and the test posed by demography: the alarming employment situation; The development of education: yesterday's success and today's problems; Population policy and contraceptive practice: the 1980s as a turning point; and The provision of family planning services: difficulties persist despite quantitative growth.
Correspondence: Centre Français sur la Population et le Développement, 15 rue de l'Ecole de Médecine, 75270 Paris Cedex 06, France. E-mail: cep@ceped.ined.fr. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30664 Mohan, Rakesh. Industrial location policies and their implications for India. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 289-314 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
The author reviews the rationale of industrial location policies and their implications in India. The article "reviews the results of all these industrial location policies by examining the distribution of industries across the fifteen major states of India with a population of 10 million or more. The effort is to compute indices of concentration and evaluate their trend over time since the early 1970s when locational policies first came into operation."
Correspondence: R. Mohan, Government of India, Planning Commission, Delhi, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30665 Ortega Osona, José A.; Reher, David S. Standard of living, reproduction, and health in South America during the twentieth century: a time-series analysis. [Nivel de vida, reproducción y salud en América del Sur durante el siglo XX: un análisis de series temporales.] European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, No. 60, Jun 1996. 31-70 pp. Amsterdam, Netherlands. In Spa. with sum. in Eng.
"Based on published vital statistics and economic data from twentieth century Argentina and Chile, the authors undertake a systematic evaluation of the interactions holding between yearly and monthly economic and demographic fluctuations over much of the present century. Adjustments to data are proposed, as are new approaches to the statistical modelling of these interactions. Based on the use of distributed lag models, this study suggests that while economic variations continue to have implications for demographic behaviour, that relationship has varied substantially in the past decades."
Correspondence: J. A. Ortega Osona, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, 28049 Madrid, Spain. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

64:30666 Payne, James E.; Ewing, Bradley T. Population and economic growth: a cointegration analysis of lesser developed countries. Applied Economics Letters, Vol. 4, No. 11, Nov 1997. 665-9 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"This paper examines the temporal relationship between population growth and economic growth for a sample of less developed countries.... Of the thirteen countries examined cointegration was present in only three countries. Although ten countries did not exhibit properties of cointegration, it is noted that researchers undertaking time series studies of the relationship between population growth and economic growth utilizing differenced data should evaluate the possible long-run relationship."
Correspondence: J. E. Payne, Eastern Kentucky University, Department of Economics and Finance, Richmond, KY 40475-3176. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

K.1.3. Developed Countries

Studies on the relations between population and economic factors as they affect the developed world. Also includes studies on the economic effects of a stationary or declining population, the effects of aging on the economy, retirement, and problems of economic dependency in developed countries.

64:30667 Carter, Susan B.; Sutch, Richard. Historical background to current immigration issues. In: The immigration debate: studies on the economic, demographic, and fiscal effects of immigration, edited by James P. Smith and Barry Edmonston. 1998. 289-366 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"The assigned task for this chapter was to review, synthesize, and assess the scholarly literature on the economic and demographic impacts of the last great mass migration to the United States in the early part of this century. Our objective was to do this in a way that would lend further understanding of the consequences of current migration flows.... Although different, the American economy is probably no less complex and interdependent than it was at the turn of the century. This fact suggests that scholars might profitably take a longer view and shift at least some of their attention away from redistributive issues and toward the impact of immigration on productivity, growth, and economic development."
Correspondence: S. B. Carter, University of California, Department of Economics, Riverside, CA 92521. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30668 Clune, Michael S. The fiscal impacts of immigrants: a California case study. In: The immigration debate: studies on the economic, demographic, and fiscal effects of immigration, edited by James P. Smith and Barry Edmonston. 1998. 120-82 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"In this chapter I examine the fiscal impacts of native and foreign-born households in California on federal, state, and local governments.... The [second] section describes the data and methodology used for this study. In the third section I review the structure of the federal, state, and local revenues and expenditures for fiscal year 1995. In the fourth section I provide an overview of the characteristics of California's native and immigrant households, providing the foundation for the tax and benefit estimates discussed in the fifth section.... The primary data source is the California sample of the Current Population Survey (CPS), March 1995, Annual Demographic File."
Correspondence: M. S. Clune, University of California, Department of Demography, 2232 Piedmont Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94720. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30669 Dellis, Arnaud; Pestieau, Pierre. Economic growth and population growth. [Croissance économique et croissance démographique.] In: Démographie: analyse et synthèse. Causes et conséquences des évolutions démographiques, Volume 1. Sep 1997. 245-66 pp. Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento di Scienze Demografiche: Rome, Italy; Institut National d'Etudes Démographiques [INED]: Paris, France; Université Catholique de Louvain, Institut de Démographie, Département des Sciences de la Population et du Développement: Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. In Fre.
The objective of this study is to review the various hypotheses that have been put forward concerning the influence of demographic factors on productivity and technical progress from an economist's perspective. The authors conclude that neither the theoretical nor the empirical research that has been done on this relationship permits definitive conclusions concerning the impact of population growth on technical progress. However, demographic trends can be shown to have a clear effect on productivity, in that an aging population should experience increases in productivity. They also conclude that the age and generation effects of an aging population on both productivity and technological change are probably insignificant. The primary focus is on developed countries.
Correspondence: A. Dellis, Université de Liège, CREPP, Place du 20-Août 7, 4000 Liège, Belgium. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30670 Denton, Frank T.; Spencer, Byron G. Population aging and the maintenance of social support systems. QSEP Research Report, No. 320, Sep 1996. 23 pp. McMaster University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Program for Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population: Hamilton, Canada. In Eng.
"In this paper we discuss a number of issues related broadly to population aging in Canada and the associated social `costs', including the costs of public services. We conclude that while population-related cost increases should be expected, and reallocations of resources required, the overall increases should be of manageable proportions."
Correspondence: McMaster University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Program for Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M4, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30671 Garvey, Deborah L.; Espenshade, Thomas J. Fiscal impacts of immigrant and native households: a New Jersey case study. In: The immigration debate: studies on the economic, demographic, and fiscal effects of immigration, edited by James P. Smith and Barry Edmonston. 1998. 66-119 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"In this chapter we examine the fiscal impacts of immigrants from a micro perspective utilizing household-level information on New Jersey's population from the 1990 [U.S.] census. A comprehensive view is taken of state and local government revenues from and expenditures on noninstitutional households, which means that we are able to evaluate the net fiscal implications associated with immigrant families. Finally, we compare the budgetary consequences of households headed by native-born versus foreign-born individuals. Our results suggest that the typical New Jersey household, whether native or foreign born, uses more state and local government services than it pays for with taxes."
Correspondence: D. L. Garvey, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Princeton, NJ 08544-1021. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30672 MaCurdy, Thomas; Nechyba, Thomas; Bhattacharya, Jay. An economic framework for assessing the fiscal impacts of immigration. In: The immigration debate: studies on the economic, demographic, and fiscal effects of immigration, edited by James P. Smith and Barry Edmonston. 1998. 13-65 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"In this chapter we propose a basic economic framework for evaluating the fiscal impact of immigrants, addressing the complicated issues of demographic characteristics, skill levels, multiple levels of government, and the dynamic effects of a changing [U.S.] population.... We explore the factors that are relevant in evaluating the consequences of different patterns of growth, distinguishing between population increases arising from uniform shifts in all groups and disproportionate increases in particular groups, such as the elderly or the unskilled.... We review how the existing literature fits into our framework, permitting us to surmise the costs and benefits improperly assessed or missed in these various studies."
Correspondence: T. MaCurdy, Stanford University, Hoover Institution, Department of Economics, Stanford, CA 94305. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30673 Philipson, Tomas J.; Becker, Gary S. Old-age longevity and mortality-contingent claims. Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 106, No. 3, Jun 1998. 551-73 pp. Chicago, Illinois. In Eng.
"This paper analyzes the savings and longevity impacts of mortality-contingent claims, defined here as income measures, such as annuities and life insurance, under which earned income is contingent on the length of one's life.... We argue that annuities involve moral hazard effects that increase longevity and, among other things, introduce a positive interaction between public programs for health care and income support for the elderly--programs that have grown enormously in developed countries."
Correspondence: T. J. Philipson, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

64:30674 Stewart, Susan D. Effect of changing mortality on the working life of American men and women, 1970-1990. Social Biology, Vol. 44, No. 1-2, Spring-Summer 1997. 153-8 pp. Port Angeles, Washington. In Eng.
"This study assesses the extent to which mortality among persons of working age represents an economic loss to society.... Causes of death affecting primarily older Americans (heart disease, cancer, stroke) had a relatively small and declining impact on the working lives of men and women. Major causes of death affecting the young (motor vehicle accidents, homicide, AIDS), although accounting for fewer deaths, were responsible for many more years of lost productivity."
Correspondence: S. D. Stewart, Bowling Green State University, Department of Sociology, Bowling Green, OH 43403-0231. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

K.2. Population Growth and Natural Resources

Studies on the environment, quality of life, conservation, food production, etc., and their interrelations with population factors.

64:30675 Amalric, F.; Banuri, T. People, the environment and responsibility: case studies from rural Pakistan. ISBN 1-85070-652-2. LC 95-18100. 1995. viii, 107 pp. Parthenon Publishing Group: Pearl River, New York/Carnforth, England. In Eng.
Several case studies from rural Pakistan illustrating the relationships among population dynamics, environmental changes, and economic development are presented. The authors note that, although rapid rates of population growth and environmental degradation are often seen by outsiders as major national problems, they are not seen as such from a local perspective. The data were collected in 1991 and 1992 in open-ended discussions with villagers. It is suggested that major causes of the lack of concern at the local level with these problems are a lack of empowerment and of a sense of responsibility for events, combined with the inability of the central government to provide for local needs through institutional constraints and its inability to foster people's participation in collective projects.
Correspondence: Parthenon Publishing, Casterton Hall, Carnforth LA6 2LA, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30676 Ashley, Caroline; Müller, Hansjörg; Harris, Martin. Population dynamics, the environment, and demand for water and energy in Namibia. Directorate of Environmental Affairs Research Discussion Paper, No. 7, LC 95-982121. Sep 1995. ii, 28 pp. Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Environmental Affairs: Windhoek, Namibia. In Eng.
"This paper builds on a 1994 paper [that]...reviewed the evidence that population growth and other pressures are degrading Namibia's resources of productive land and water, and outlined some strategies for supporting a growing population. The present paper summarises findings of the previous paper, and goes further in two ways: firstly, in addition to land and water, energy resources have been included...; secondly, this paper focuses less on assessing the current situation and more on policy recommendations to be included in Namibia's emerging population policy."
Correspondence: Ministry of Environment and Tourism, Directorate of Environmental Affairs, Private Bag 13306, Windhoek, Namibia. Location: U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

64:30677 Auclair, Laurent. Population and the environment: a methodological test in the Haut Tell of Tunisia. [Population et environment: un essai méthodologique dans le Haut Tell tunisien.] Espace, Populations, Sociétés, No. 1, 1998. 33-44 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"This contribution begins by describing the background of global interactions between population and the environment in Tunisia. Then, after a short presentation of the case study in the Haut Tell, the article presents an original typology of rural households...discussing how forests and pastures are used. This approach shows how the use of space is determined by specific production systems and family strategies...by the various types of households. Schematically, we can consider three major types of household resource-use strategies: (1) The traditional approach based on having large families to use the uplands natural resources. (2) Migration which in practice represents a disinvestment in agriculture. (3) Intensification of land use by practising irrigation."
Correspondence: L. Auclair, Institut Français de Recherche Scientifique pour le Développement en Coopération, B.P. 434, 1004 Tunis El Menzah, Tunisia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30678 Black, Richard; Sessay, Mohamed. Forced migration, natural resource use and environmental change: the case of the Senegal River Valley. International Journal of Population Geography, Vol. 4, No. 1, Mar 1998. 31-47 pp. Chichester, England. In Eng.
"This paper addresses concerns about the potential negative environmental consequences of mass population displacement, through an examination of changes in natural resource use in an area of northern Senegal affected by an influx of Mauritanian refugees in 1989. Drawing on a survey of refugee and local households, the paper examines the livelihood strategies and patterns of natural resource use of the two populations, and considers the notion that refugees are forced, through poverty or for other reasons, to use natural resources in a more destructive manner. The paper also considers the regulation of natural resource use, and the socio-economic and political context within which this resource use takes place."
Correspondence: R. Black, University of Sussex, School of African and Asian Studies, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QN, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30679 Daily, Gretchen; Dasgupta, Partha; Bolin, Bert; Crosson, Pierre; du Guerny, Jacques; Ehrlich, Paul; Folke, Carl; Jansson, Ann M.; Jansson, Bengt-Owe; Kautsky, Nils; Kinzig, Ann; Levin, Simon; Mäler, Karl-Göran; Pinstrup-Andersen, Per; Siniscalco, Domenico; Walker, Brian. Food production, population growth, and the environment. Science, Vol. 281, No. 5381, Aug 28, 1998. 1,291-2 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"There are two broad criteria by which one can judge humanity's success in feeding itself: (i) the proportion of people whose access to basic nutritional requirements is secure, and (ii) the extent to which global food production is sustainable.... Writings on the sustainability of the food supply have often encouraged readers to adopt an all-or-nothing position (predicting a rosy or a catastrophic future).... On the other hand, writings on the adequacy of the world's food supply frequently conclude with the truism that the nearly 1 billion people in poor countries who go to bed hungry each night do so because they are extremely poor. In short, the second `sustainability' approach has focused on aggregate food production and its future, whereas the first has isolated food-distribution failure as a cause of world hunger. Here we argue that these two questions should not be studied separately, that their link is revealed in the interactions between ecological and economic systems operating primarily at the geographically localized level, and that policy interventions must target this link."
Correspondence: G. Daily, Stanford University, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford, CA 94305. Location: Princeton University Library (SQ).

64:30680 Entwisle, Barbara; Walsh, Stephen J.; Rindfuss, Ronald R.; Chamratrithirong, Aphichat. Land-use/land-cover and population dynamics, Nang Rong, Thailand. In: People and pixels: linking remote sensing and social science, edited by Diana Liverman, Emilio F. Moran, Ronald R. Rindfuss, and Paul C. Stern. 1998. 121-44 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This chapter describes ongoing research in Nang Rong, Thailand that joins social, biophysical, and spatial perspectives, data, and tools to study population and environment there. To date, this research has addressed two sets of questions: Did land use/land cover in the 1970s and early 1980s affect the subsequent out-migration of young adults...? [and] Did population change between 1984 and 1994--including rates of growth (or decline), household formation, and net in- and out-migration--affect land use/land cover in 1994...? If so, what was the nature of these effects?"
Correspondence: B. Entwisle, University of North Carolina, Carolina Population Center, University Square, CB 8120, 124 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27516-3997. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30681 Falkenmark, Malin. Meeting water requirements of an expanding world population. In: Land resources: on the edge of the Malthusian precipice?, edited by D. J. Greenland, P. J. Gregory, and P. H. Nye. 1997. 69-76 pp. CAB International: Wallingford, England. In Eng.
"Water availability in the root zone (`green water') is a critical component of plant production, but is often deficient in many Third World regions. When deficient, runoff water (`blue water') can be added. Focusing on ten physiographic regions in Africa and Asia, characterized by mainly or partly dry climates and rapid population growth, this study analyses whether in a 30-years' perspective enough blue water could be provided to allow food self-sufficiency."
Correspondence: M. Falkenmark, Natural Science Research Council, Box 7142, 10387 Stockholm, Sweden. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30682 Findlay, Allan M.; Maani, Mohammed. Population policy issues in arid lands. [Questions de géographie de population dans les pays arides.] Espace, Populations, Sociétés, No. 1, 1998. 23-31 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"Population policy makers in arid lands [work] in an atmosphere of considerable uncertainty. It is not only difficult to obtain reliable statistics on issues such as desertification and population growth, but it is also problematic to know how best to model the complex interactions which link the environmental and demographic regimes of arid lands. A case study from the Badia region of Jordan is used to illustrate the unprecedented rate of population growth which policy makers have to contend with in their strategies for development of an increasingly vulnerable environment. From the case study, as well as from a review of the research literature on arid lands, three different approaches to formulating policies on population-environment matters are reviewed."
Correspondence: A. M. Findlay, University of Dundee, Department of Geography, Dundee DD1 4HN, Scotland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30683 Fischer, Günther; Heilig, Gerhard K. Population momentum and the demand on land and water resources. In: Land resources: on the edge of the Malthusian precipice?, edited by D. J. Greenland, P. J. Gregory, and P. H. Nye. 1997. 9-29 pp. CAB International: Wallingford, England. In Eng.
"This paper investigates, by major world regions and countries, what we know about population growth, what can be projected with reasonable certainty, and what is pure speculation. The exposition sets a frame for analysing demographic driving forces that are expected to increase human demand and pressures on land and water resources. These have been contrasted with current resource assessments of regional availability and use of land, in particular with estimates of remaining land with cultivation potential."
Correspondence: G. Fischer, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Schloßplatz 1, 2361 Laxenburg, Austria. E-mail: fischer@iiasa.ac.at. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30684 Greenland, D. J.; Gregory, P. J.; Nye, P. H. Land resources: on the edge of the Malthusian precipice? ISBN 0-85199-235-8. Dec 1997. vii, 180 pp. CAB International: Wallingford, England. In Eng.
"A meeting was held at the Royal Society in London on December 4 and 5, 1996, to bring together leading scientists concerned with various aspects of land and water resources, to make a critical scientific assessment of the production potential of the land, and of the constraints which may limit its achievement. The constraints include climatic factors, water availability, factors related to crop nutrition and soil quality, and economic and environmental factors related to intensified land use." Two papers relating to population aspects are included in this monograph; they deal with population momentum and the demand on land and water resources, and meeting water requirements of an expanding world population.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: CAB International, Wallingford, Oxon OX10 8DE, England. E-mail: cabi@cabi.org. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30685 LeRoy, Pamela. Troubled waters: population and water scarcity. Colorado Journal of International Environmental Law and Policy, Vol. 6, No. 2, Summer 1995. 299-326 pp. Niwot, Colorado. In Eng.
The relationship between the world's available freshwater supplies and global population growth is examined. The author points out that, although the planet's supply of water is a constant, population numbers change, and that renewable freshwater is already a scarce commodity in many regions of the world. She discusses the limits to freshwater resources, the countries that are experiencing water scarcities or stresses today or that will experience them by the year 2025, the implications of water shortages for health and the environment, and the relationship between water shortages and conflict. Some strategies that could help resolve water-related problems are outlined, focusing on the need to stabilize population numbers.
Correspondence: P. LeRoy, Population Action International, 1120 19th Street NW, Suite 550, Washington, D.C. 20036. Location: Cornell University Library, Ithaca, NY.

64:30686 Meyerson, Frederick A. B. Population, carbon emissions, and global warming: the forgotten relationship at Kyoto. Population and Development Review, Vol. 24, No. 1, Mar 1998. 115-30, 198, 200 pp. New York, New York. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"This article examines the historical relationship between population growth and carbon emissions and the challenges facing the signatories of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on global warming.... Even assuming the Protocol is successfully implemented, the global warming treaty cannot succeed without the near-term participation of developing countries, many of which already or will soon produce excessive carbon emissions as a combined result of large population size and fairly high per capita carbon use. Internationally, population stabilization policies will also be a key determinant of the success of any climate plan."
Correspondence: F. A. B. Meyerson, Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Box 1987, Yale Station, 277 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30687 Ness, Gayl D.; Golay, Meghan V. Population and strategies for national sustainable development: a guide to assist national policy makers in linking population and environment in strategies for sustainable development. ISBN 1-85383-375-4. LC 97-113180. 1997. xi, 148 pp. Earthscan Publications: London, England; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]: New York, New York. In Eng.
"The guide serves as a resource for national-level policy makers and the staff of conservation organizations who wish to integrate population and environmental conditions in planning for sustainable development. It presents the basic rationale for linking population and environmental issues, including the demonstrable impact that growth in population and consumption is having on the environment.... A number of mechanisms for achieving integration [is] presented.... For those less familiar with previous research, the book includes a primer on demographic change and models and frameworks for understanding the links between population dynamics (births, deaths, growth, migration) and environmental change."
Correspondence: Earthscan Publications, 120 Pentonville Road, London N1 9JN, England. E-mail: earthinfo@earthscan.co.uk. Location: U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

64:30688 Noin, Daniel; Picouët, Michel. Population and the environment in arid countries. [Populations et environment dans le monde aride.] Espace, Populations, Sociétés, No. 1, 1998. 135 pp. Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, U.F.R. de Géographie: Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
This is a special issue on populations and the environment in arid countries. Articles are also included on population policy, desertification, drought and displacement, natural resources and social needs, and future prospects. The articles examine the situation in Jordan, Tunisia, Mali, and Burkina Faso.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille-Flandres-Artois, U.F.R. de Géographie, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30689 Noin, Daniel. Population and the environment in arid countries. [Population et environment dans le monde aride.] Espace, Populations, Sociétés, No. 1, 1998. 13-22 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"The article is a general approach to population and the environment in the arid world. Arid regions are not well delimited. They cover approximately 33% of the earth's land surface.... In spite of various limitations, the arid world has a relatively important population. The overall estimate for 1994 is 841 million people, that is to say 15 per cent of the world population; and growth has far from ceased. The degradation of the environment in the arid lands is indisputable but there is controversy about the extent of desertification. It is made of three aspects: degradation of vegetal cover, degradation of soils, and decline in water resources. Interrelationships between population and the environment are very complex."
Correspondence: D. Noin, Université de Paris I, Institut de Géographie, 191 rue Saint-Jacques, 75005 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30690 Picouët, Michel; Sghaïer, Mongi; Zaafouri, Mohamed S. Population and environment relationships in the Tunisian desert. [Relation population-environment en Tunisie désertique.] Espace, Populations, Sociétés, No. 1, 1998. 53-65 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"Population growth, diffusion of growth models and the end of cultural and social autarky have shaken traditional equilibria, particularly in recently-settled nomad populations. In the oasis of El Faouar, in the Tunisian desert, the degradation of pastures and the increased scarcity of vegetation have deeply shattered the traditions of local pastoralists; through the impulse of the state, they have turned to irrigated agriculture. The theme developed in this article is that this process of change and its impact on the environment is linked to the ability of households to maintain their social and family reproduction on renewed bases. This ability, which changes in the various groups, can have different aspects."
Correspondence: M. Picouët, Institut Français de Recherche Scientifique pour le Développement en Coopération, B.P. 434, 1004 Tunis El Menzah, Tunisia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30691 Poda, Nayiré E. Space, natural resources, and social needs in Burkina Faso: what future for the environment? [Espace, resources naturelles et demandes sociales au Burkina Faso: quel avenir pour l'environnement?] Espace, Populations, Sociétés, No. 1, 1998. 83-96 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"The article analyses population-environment relationships in a country of the Sahel region which is partly affected by aridity. The situation is serious in Burkina Faso through the fast population growth and rapid process of desertification. The environment has a strong influence on population, particularly in the North where soils are poor and droughts are frequent. The population has also a strong influence on the environment; cultivated lands are growing, slash and burn agriculture is destructive, wood is largely used for building huts and houses; many other activities and customs contribute to the degradation of vegetal cover. Since...independence, various policies have tried to save natural resources."
Correspondence: N. E. Poda, CNRST, Institut des Sciences de Sociétés, 03 B.P. 7047, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30692 Randall, Sara. Drought and displacement in Douentza (Mali), a Sahelian case study. [Un exemple sahélien: sécheresse et déplacements à Douentza (Mali).] Espace, Populations, Sociétés, No. 1, 1998. 67-82 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"The Sahelian droughts of the last two decades have generated new forms of adaptation to this unpredictable environment: the substantial populations who survive on the fringes of urban areas. This case study examines the composition and survival strategies of the displaced population around Douentza in 1988 and suggests that whereas farmers have tended to use the drought as an excuse for migrating to towns, former pastoralists are continuing to use traditional skills and natural resources to scrape a precarious living using all available labour. Previous social status is an important determinant of the effort households make to survive with former high status groups having problems adapting to their new poverty."
Correspondence: S. Randall, University College London, Department of Anthropology, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30693 Ryberg, Jesper. The argument from overpopulation--logical and ethical considerations. Population and Environment, Vol. 19, No. 5, May 1998. 411-30 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"A traditional subject of discussion in population debates is whether the world or any subdivisions of it are overpopulated.... This article considers an argument from overpopulation, according to which overpopulation justifies policies which reduce population size; and an argument against overpopulation, according to which the fact that present problems can be handled without population reductions establishes that there is no state of overpopulation. Both arguments are rejected by clarifying possible definitions of overpopulation." A critique by Herschel Elliott is included (pp. 427-30).
Correspondence: J. Ryberg, Webersgade 19, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30694 Scherr, Sara J. People and environment: what is the relationship between exploitation of natural resources and population growth in the South? Forum for Development Studies, No. 1, 1997. 33-58 pp. Oslo, Norway. In Eng.
"The nexus between population, agriculture and natural resource management (NRM) is the subject of this article. It first briefly explores the nature and scale of the problem, and then presents a framework for examining the dynamics of land quality change. As an example, the next section presents the available evidence on land management under population pressure in...tropical hillsides.... This evidence suggests, perhaps surprisingly, that the effect of population on land quality is indeterminate; the outcome depends on other economic and institutional factors."
Location: Northwestern University Library, Evanston, IL.

64:30695 Silwal, Uma K. Population growth and agricultural change in Nepal. ISBN 0-7069-8826-4. LC 94-907328. 1995. xx, 279 pp. Vikas Publishing: New Delhi, India. In Eng.
"The main purpose of this study is to contribute in the understanding of the pattern and interrelationships between the changes in population and agriculture [in Nepal] and examine the extent of the impact of population growth on land use, agricultural output and productivity.... The salient feature of this study is to focus on regional analysis.... The variation in population growth and subsequent impact on the area under cultivation and output is quite large between the regions.... In most of the regions, however, there has been no increase in productivity as a result of population growth."
Correspondence: Vikas Publishing House, Surya Rao Pet, Vijaijawa 2, New Delhi, India. Location: U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

64:30696 Waterlow, J. C.; Armstrong, D. G.; Fowden, Leslie; Riley, Ralph. Feeding a world population of more than eight billion people: a challenge to science. ISBN 0-19-511312-8. LC 97-30064. 1998. xv, 280 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This book takes a critical look at the immediate challenges for feeding the [the world's] population just a generation from now. Based on the 10th International Symposium sponsored by the Nutrition Committee and the Trustees of the Rank Prize Funds, the volume examines the full range of related issues, from food economics to resource allocation and crop yields. Beginning with an analysis of future food needs, the articles cover basic resources and constraints, applications of science to increase yield, the role of animal products in feeding eight billion people, and diverse social issues. The book provides insights into these and other important questions the world will be faced with in the coming years, making it an invaluable resource for a wide range of those interested in agriculture, the environment, and public policy."
Correspondence: Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

K.3. Employment and Labor Force Participation

Studies of employment and labor force statistics that are of demographic relevance. Includes studies of the labor force (employment status, occupation, and industry) and of the relations among employment, labor force participation, and population factors. Studies on the effect of female labor force participation on fertility are coded under F.1. General Fertility and cross-referenced here.

64:30697 Angrist, Joshua D.; Evans, William N. Children and their parents' labor supply: evidence from exogenous variation in family size. American Economic Review, Vol. 88, No. 3, Jun 1998. 450-77 pp. Nashville, Tennessee. In Eng.
"This study uses parental preferences for a mixed sibling-sex composition to construct instrumental variables (IV) estimates of the effect of childbearing on labor supply. IV estimates for women are significant but smaller than ordinary least-squares estimates. The IV are also smaller for more educated women and show no impact of family size on husbands' labor supply. A comparison of estimates using sibling-sex composition and twins instruments implies that the impact of a third child disappears when the child reaches age 13."
Correspondence: J. D. Angrist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Economics, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA 02139. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

64:30698 Azis, Iwan J. The increasing role of the urban non-formal sector in Indonesia: employment analysis within a multisectoral framework. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 142-59 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
"The multisectoral framework applied in this chapter will specifically disaggregate the Indonesian economy into six types, including the category of non-formal sector (both urban and rural). The information is taken from the data tapes of Susenas (national economic and social survey) 1982 and 1987.... The phenomenon of industrial location in relation to employment patterns and trends of urban migration is discussed.... It is suspected that patterns of industrial location will reinforce flows of migrants to urban areas."
Correspondence: I. J. Azis, Universitas Indonesia, Fakultas Ekonomi, Jl. Salemba Raya 4, Campus Depok, West Java, Indonesia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30699 Birchenall, Javier; Gutiérrez, Javier A.; Leibovich, José; Maurer, Martin; Mesa, Fernando; Parra, Clara E.; Perfetti, Mauricio; Sánchez Torres, Fabio; Uribe, María C. Social themes: essays on labor economy. [Temas sociales: ensayos de economía laboral.] Planeación y Desarrollo, Vol. 27, No. 4, Oct-Dec 1996. 206 pp. Departamento Nacional de Planeación: Bogotá, Colombia. In Spa.
This is a collection of five articles on problems in the labor market in Colombia. The articles are as follows: The effects of economic liberalization on the industrial labor market, by Fernando Mesa and Javier Alberto Gutiérrez; Internal migration in Colombia: an explanatory model of the assimilation process, by José Leibovich; Wage differentials between non-wage-earning men and women during the period 1984-1994, by Mauricio Perfetti; A Keynesian model of the Colombian economy, by Fabio Sánchez Torres and Clara E. Parra; and A system of leading indicators for Colombia, by Martin Maurer, María C. Uribe, and Javier Birchenall.
Correspondence: Departamento Nacional de Planeación, Biblioteca, Calle 26, No. 13-19, 2o Piso, Bogotá, Colombia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30700 Boehm, Thomas P.; Herzog, Henry W.; Schlottmann, Alan M. Does migration matter? Job search outcomes for the unemployed. Review of Regional Studies, Vol. 28, No. 1, Summer 1998. 3-12 pp. Knoxville, Tennessee. In Eng.
"In this study we investigate migration's effect on labor market transitions [in the United States]. Specifically, we explore transition rates out of unemployment (to employment) and from nonparticipation to active job search. To facilitate this, a multistate model of the hazard rate is developed and subsequently estimated. Our results strongly suggest that migration is both directly and indirectly associated with a successful transition to re-employment."
Correspondence: T. P. Boehm, University of Tennessee, College of Business Administration, Knoxville, TN 37996. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

64:30701 Bouchard, Gérard; Bourque, Mario; Larouche, Jeannette; Bergeron, Lise. Decennial censuses of the labor force using a population register. Presentation of a methodology. [Recensement décennal de la population active à l'aide d'un fichier de population. Présentation d'une méthodologie.] Cahiers Québécois de Démographie, Vol. 26, No. 2, Autumn 1997. 247-76; 340-1 pp. Montreal, Canada. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"This paper describes a methodology...to use the BALSAC population register (for the Saguenay region [of Canada]) to simulate 10-year censuses of the so-called active (male) population at the regional level. The method set forth takes into account a number of biases and deficiencies related to under-registration of demographic events and under-declaration of occupations in the birth, marriage and death records.... It becomes possible to analyze the regional and sub-regional male job structure and its evolution between 1851 and 1961, using uniform criteria and classification grid."
Correspondence: G. Bouchard, Université du Québec, Institut Interuniversitaire de recherches sur les populations, 555 boulevard de l'Université, Chicoutimi, Quebec G7H 2B1, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30702 de Silva, Arnold. Immigrant participation in the unemployment insurance system. Canadian Public Policy/Analyse de Politiques, Vol. 23, No. 4, Dec 1997. 375-97 pp. North York, Canada. In Eng. with sum. in Fre.
"This paper finds that there are significant differences in the probability of UI [unemployment insurance] participation across ethnic groups [in Canada].... It also finds that whereas the probability of immigrants who came to Canada before 1975 receiving UI is often not significantly different from that of the British who came before 1966, this is not the case with those who arrived after 1975. Several ethnic groups are found to have a relatively high UI propensity."
Correspondence: A. de Silva, Human Resources Development Canada, Applied Research Branch, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SF).

64:30703 Fairlie, Robert W.; Meyer, Bruce D. Does immigration hurt African-American self-employment? NBER Working Paper, No. 6265, Nov 1997. 41, [13] pp. National Bureau of Economic Research [NBER]: Cambridge, Massachusetts. In Eng.
"We use Census of Population microdata to examine if black self-employment levels are lower in labor markets which have a higher share of immigrants. We define labor markets as metropolitan areas (MAs) and use the variation across 94 MAs in the U.S. to examine the relationship between black self-employment and immigration in both 1980 and 1990. To control for permanent differences across MAs in other influences, we also estimate the effect of the change in immigration from 1980 to 1990 on the change in black self-employment over this period. We generally find that immigration has no effect or only a small negative but statistically insignificant effect on black male or female self-employment. Our findings are similar if we weight immigration rates by the propensity of immigrant groups to be self-employed, if we limit our sample of immigrants to those from only Asian countries, and if we try other alternative estimation techniques and specifications."
Correspondence: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138. Author's E-mail: rfairlie@cats.ucsc.edu. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

64:30704 Funkhouser, Edward; Trejo, Stephen J. Labor market outcomes of female immigrants in the United States. In: The immigration debate: studies on the economic, demographic, and fiscal effects of immigration, edited by James P. Smith and Barry Edmonston. 1998. 239-88 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"Using microdata from the 1980 and 1990 U.S. censuses, we perform...an analysis of two key labor market outcomes for immigrant women: employment and hourly earnings.... We describe the census data and some of the basic patterns evident in these data.... We discuss the regression framework we use to estimate the effects of arrival cohort and assimilation on immigrant outcomes.... We present our regression analyses of the employment and hourly earnings of foreign-born women. For comparison purposes...we also report similar employment and wage regressions for men."
Correspondence: E. Funkhouser, University of California, Department of Economics, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30705 Hou, Feng; Omwanda, Lewis O. A multilevel analysis of the connection between female labour force participation and divorce in Canada, 1931-1991. International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Vol. 38, No. 3-4, Dec 1997. 271-88 pp. Leiden, Netherlands. In Eng.
"This study investigates the causal order between women's employment and divorce in Canada 1931-1991. An econometric model--the Granger-Hsiao test--is applied to time series data to identify the form and direction of the relationship between these two events and predict their pattern of change over time. Autoregressive estimates show that increased entry of women into the work force was a causal factor in the rise in divorce rates from 1931-1969; after 1969 the direction of causality switched. Relative risk estimates obtained from individual-level survey data using Cox's proportional hazard models confirm the time series results but, in addition, show that labour force participation was a significant predictor of the risk of marital dissolution only among women who married between 1950 and 1969 and who worked without interruption."
Correspondence: F. Hou, University of Western Ontario, Department of Sociology, Population Studies Centre, London, Ontario N6A 5C2, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30706 McDonald, James T.; Worswick, Christopher. Unemployment incidence of immigrant men in Canada. Canadian Public Policy/Analyse de Politiques, Vol. 23, No. 4, Dec 1997. 353-74 pp. Guelph, Canada. In Eng. with sum. in Fre.
"The unemployment incidence of immigrant and non-immigrant men in Canada is compared using 11 cross-sectional surveys spanning the years from 1982 to 1993. Recent immigrants are found to have higher unemployment probabilities than nonimmigrants with the difference being larger in recession years. Subsequently, measures of unemployment assimilation of immigrants are found to be sensitive to the macro-economic conditions of the survey years. The main implication of the results for policy is that recent immigrants would benefit most from labour market programs that facilitate the transition of unemployed immigrants back to employment during recessions."
Correspondence: J. T. McDonald, University of Tasmania, Department of Economics, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30707 Paiva, Paulo de T. A. Fifty years of population growth and absorption of labor in Brazil: from 1950 to 2000. Brazilian Journal of Population Studies, Vol. 1, 1997-1998. 105-22 pp. São Paulo, Brazil. In Eng.
"The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it will seek to evaluate past growth tendencies of the Economically Active Population (EAP) and of employment in Brazil. Second, it will seek to analyze the potential growth of the labor force until the year 2000."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30708 Stark, Oded; Helmenstein, Christian; Prskawetz, Alexia. Human capital depletion, human capital formation, and migration: a blessing in a "curse"? Reihe Ökonomie/Economics Series, No. 55, Jun 1998. 7 pp. Institut für Höhere Studien [IHS]/Institute for Advanced Studies: Vienna, Austria. In Eng.
"We specify conditions under which a strictly positive probability of employment in a foreign country raises the level of human capital formed by optimizing workers in the home country. While some workers migrate, `taking along' more human capital than if they had migrated without factoring in the possibility of migration (a form of brain drain), other workers stay at home with more human capital than they would have formed in the absence of the possibility of migration (a form of brain gain)."
Correspondence: Institut für Höhere Studien, Stumpergasse 56, 1060 Vienna, Austria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30709 White, Michael J.; Liang, Zai. The effect of immigration on the internal migration of the native-born population, 1981-1990. Population Research and Policy Review, Vol. 17, No. 2, Apr 1998. 141-66 pp. Dordrecht, Netherlands. In Eng.
"This study examines the impact of immigration on the labor market opportunities of the native-born [U.S.] population by looking through the window of migration. We use Current Population Survey data to analyze the one-year migration patterns of Anglos and Blacks and include the presence of recent immigrants in the origin and (potential) destination U.S. states among the covariates.... States with high levels of recent immigration are less likely to retain Anglo workers or receive new Anglo interstate migrants, but this apparent substitution effect is partially offset by the presence of long-term immigrant stock."
Correspondence: M. J. White, Brown University, Population Studies and Training Center, Box 1916, Providence, RI 02912. E-mail: michael_white@brown.edu. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30710 Yan, Xiaopei. Study on the migrant labour force of China in recent years--a case study of Nanhai City, Guangdong Province. Chinese Geographical Science, Vol. 7, No. 1, 1997. 19-29 pp. Beijing, China. In Eng.
"This paper, taking Nanhai City of Guangdong Province as an example, focuses on five interrelated aspects of the migrant labour force of China in recent years. Attention is initially paid to the background of the labour migration from inland towards coastal areas. Then, the demographic characteristics of the migrant labour force are analysed before turning to the analysis [of] the reasons for the migration. Fourthly, the impacts of the migrant workers on the socio-economic development of Nanhai City and the problems are examined. Finally, the prospects and some suggestions for...labour migration are put forward."
Correspondence: X. Yan, Zhongshan University, Centre for Urban and Regional Studies, Guangzhou 510275, China. Location: Cornell University Library, Ithaca, NY.


Copyright © 1998, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.