Volume 64 - Number 3 - Fall 1998

C. Spatial Distribution

Studies with an emphasis on locational patterns and their interpretation.

C.1. General Spatial Distribution

Studies of rural and urban populations considered together. Studies that are concerned primarily with the movement of population are classified under H. Migration. Studies concerned with the definition of urban or rural areas and with boundary changes are classified here or in O.1. Population Statistics, General Aspects.

64:30068 Cheng, Lim Keak. Geographic analysis of the Singapore population. Census of Population, 1990: Monograph, No. 5, ISBN 99-7188-477-1. LC 96-945751. 1995. xii, 111 pp. Department of Statistics: Singapore. In Eng.
"The present study is essentially concerned with the spatial patterns of Singapore's population in 1990; how the spatial patterns have changed as compared to [those] of 1980; and the processes that have contributed to the patterns and their changes over time." Chapters are included on population growth and ethnic composition; population distribution and density; sex ratio and age structure; literacy and educational attainment; housing; and economic characteristics.
Correspondence: Ministry of Trade and Industry, Department of Statistics, Singapore. Location: U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

64:30069 Eichperger, Leo; Filius, Friedel. Regional differences in population. [Regionale verschillen in bevolking.] Maandstatistiek van de Bevolking, Vol. 46, No. 3, Mar 1998. 14-25 pp. Voorburg, Netherlands. In Dut. with sum. in Eng.
"The majority of the Dutch population lives in western and central regions of the Netherlands. According to the 1997 regional population forecasts...this situation will not change significantly in the years to come.... In the medium variant of the regional forecasts, almost all...regions will experience positive population growth in the period up to 2030.... Ageing will occur in most of the...regions, especially in the peripheral areas."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30070 Frey, William H.; Liaw, Kao-Lee. The impact of recent immigration on population redistribution within the United States. In: The immigration debate: studies on the economic, demographic, and fiscal effects of immigration, edited by James P. Smith and Barry Edmonston. 1998. 388-448 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"In this chapter we examine how recent immigration affects population redistribution within the United States, both directly and indirectly, by promoting a secondary domestic migration among native-born residents.... Particular attention is given to the apparent demographic displacement of less-skilled domestic migrants by new immigrants in high-immigration areas where we estimate the nature of this displacement under assumed increases or decreases in current immigration levels.... We provide an overview of immigration and internal migration processes over the 1985-1995 period, review findings that document the nature of selective demographic displacement in metropolitan areas and states, and present findings from a model that estimates the impact of changing immigration levels on this displacement."
Correspondence: W. H. Frey, University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2590. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30071 Fuguitt, Glenn V.; Beale, Calvin L.; Fulton, John A.; Gibson, Richard M. Recent population trends in nonmetropolitan cities and villages: from the turnaround, through reversal to the rebound. CDE Working Paper, No. 97-12, Dec 1997. 26, [7] pp. University of Wisconsin, Center for Demography and Ecology: Madison, Wisconsin. In Eng.
"The purpose of this study is to track and contrast the patterns of local concentration and deconcentration in nonmetropolitan America between 1950 and 1996.... We compare patterns of growth by nearness to metropolitan areas, and by region of the country. We also examine differences among a subset of nonmetropolitan places distinguished by the primary socioeconomic character of their county. Using a detailed data file from the 1990 census, we are able to give some consideration to commuting."
Correspondence: University of Wisconsin, Center for Demography and Ecology, 1180 Observatory Drive, Room 4412, Madison, WI 53706-1393. E-mail: cdepubs@ssc.wisc.edu. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30072 Martine, George; Diniz, Clélio C. Economic and demographic concentration in Brazil: recent inversion of historical patterns. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 205-27 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
"The chapter begins with a capsule review of the main historical trends in economic activity which shaped the configuration of Brazil's population over space until the 1930s. This serves as background for a more detailed analysis of changes in the last half-century and, particularly, in the 1970s and 1980s. Therein, attention is focused on interregional shifts in economic activity, particularly concerning the São Paulo area, as well as on changes in population distribution and urban growth."
Correspondence: G. Martine, Institute for Study of Society, Population and Nature, Caixa Postal 9944, Brasilia 70001-970, Brazil. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30073 Noin, Daniel. People on earth: world population map. ISBN 92-3-199770-X. 1997. 43 pp. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO]: Paris, France. In Eng.
"The purpose of the 1:15,000,000 world population map is to give an accurate idea of human presence on the surface of the Earth by the use of dots and symbols. It contains over 75,000 such characters and was composed from statistics supplied by many countries. The year 1990 was chosen as the benchmark year for data comparability, since a large number of census surveys were conducted that year or at the beginning of the 1990s."
Correspondence: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 7 place de Fontenoy, 75352 Paris 07, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

C.2. Urban Spatial Distribution

Studies of urban populations, including those of metropolitan areas and suburban and semi-urban zones. Also includes studies on urbanization insofar as they relate to the effects of migration on urban areas or the socioeconomic and demographic structure of urban populations. Studies on the actual process of rural-urban migration are coded under H.6. Rural-Urban Migration.

64:30074 Bibby, Peter; Shepherd, John. Urbanization in England: projections 1991-2016. ISBN 0-11-753120-0. LC 97-153778. 1995. xvi, 116 pp. Her Majesty's Stationery Office: London, England. In Eng.
"This report presents projections of urbanization in England for the period 1991-2016. These projections are trend based; they illustrate what would happen if past trends in urban growth were to continue into the future. They are not therefore policy-based forecasts of what the Government expects or intends to happen, but provide an input to policy considerations. The projections are heavily dependent on the assumptions involved, particularly on those for household projections and on the relationship between changes in land in urban uses and housing output.... The central projections presented in the main body of the report are based on the most recent (1992-based) household projections."
Correspondence: HMSO Publications Centre, P.O. Box 276, London SW8 5DT, England. Location: U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

64:30075 Brockerhoff, Martin; Brennan, Ellen. The poverty of cities in developing regions. Population and Development Review, Vol. 24, No. 1, Mar 1998. 75-114, 198, 200 pp. New York, New York. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"The long-standing presumption that living conditions are better for big-city residents has come into question. This study uses indicators of children's status and level of infant mortality to compare wellbeing across cities of one million or more residents and smaller settlements within developing regions.... Findings suggest that sustainable development of large cities is dependent not only on efficient management, good governance, and sufficient resources, but is also related to cities' size and their rate of population growth."
Correspondence: M. Brockerhoff, Population Council, Research Division, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30076 Chen, Nancy; Valente, Paolo; Zlotnik, Hania. What do we know about recent trends in urbanization? In: Migration, urbanization, and development: new directions and issues, edited by Richard E. Bilsborrow. 1998. 59-88 pp. United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]: New York, New York; Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht, Netherlands. In Eng.
This general review of trends in urbanization focuses primarily on the situation in developing countries. It begins by considering trends in counterurbanization and continued urbanization in developed countries for comparative purposes. It then looks at the situation in developing countries by region, with sections on Latin America and the Caribbean, Asia, and Africa. The components of urban growth in developing countries are then reviewed. A final section examines the relationships among urbanization, migration, and development.
Correspondence: N. Chen, United Nations, Population Division, 2 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30077 Cortesi, Gisella; Lazzeroni, Michela. Development and urban change: the case of Italy. [Développement et changement urbains: le cas de l'Italie.] Revue Economique Méridionale, Vol. 45, No. 1-2, 1997. 53-62 pp. Montpellier, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
This is a review of recent urbanization trends in Italy. The authors note that the rapid urbanization that took place in the 1950s and 1960s has given way to more moderate urban growth coupled with a regeneration of rural areas. Recently, concern has been focused less on the services provided in an urban environment, and more on environmental issues.
Correspondence: G. Cortesi, Università degli Studi di Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti 43-45, 56100 Pisa, Italy. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30078 Crahan, Margaret E.; Vourvoulias-Bush, Alberto. The city and the world: New York's global future. ISBN 0-87609-208-3. LC 97-31556. 1997. xvii, 202 pp. Council on Foreign Relations: New York, New York. In Eng.
This volume contains a selection of studies that examine the growing internationalization of many aspects of city life, focusing on the city of New York. Topics considered include "the economic restructuring of the economy, immigration, and the internationalization of crime, the changing demands on, and functions of, social and civic institutions, [and] the technological innovations that are revolutionizing how we live, do business, and form communities."
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Council on Foreign Relations, 58 East 68th Street, New York, NY 10021. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30079 Douglass, Mike. Structural change and urbanization in Indonesia: from the "old" to the "new" international division of labour. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 111-41 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
"The purpose of this chapter is to explain recent patterns of urbanization [in Indonesia] by introducing an international dimension to their conventional treatment as a `national' process contextualized solely by a state and society acting in isolation of external forces.... The major theme of this chapter is that transformations in the world economy in the 1980s have made the experience of the 1970s of doubtful utility in understanding the pressures and opportunities for development in the coming decades.... In contrasting the decade of the 1970s with that of the 1980s, a second purpose of this chapter is to argue against a `single-development-path-for-all-nations' view of development."
Correspondence: M. Douglass, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Porteus Hall 107, 2424 Maile Way, Honolulu, HI 96822. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30080 Gilbert, Alan G. The coping capacity of Latin American cities. In: Migration, urbanization, and development: new directions and issues, edited by Richard E. Bilsborrow. 1998. 435-68 pp. United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]: New York, New York; Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht, Netherlands. In Eng.
The relative success that Latin America's cities have had in coping with rapid rates of population growth since 1940 is first acknowledged. The bulk of the paper is concerned with the prospects for the region's cities during the next 10 to 20 years, and particularly with their ability to reduce poverty, improve living standards, and avoid disasters. There are sections on the economic context; the demographic context; employment; poverty, inequality, and social polarization; housing conditions; land prices; management capacity; and political and social responses. The author distinguishes between those cities that have fared relatively well and those that have not. He concludes that the rate of urban population growth has not been and is unlikely to become a major problem, but that the real test of each city will be its ability to compete in the global marketplace. In addition, even the more successful cities will have to learn how to cope better with the problems of pollution and urban poverty.
Correspondence: A. G. Gilbert, University College London, Department of Geography, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30081 Haddad, Paulo R. Industrial location policies and the urbanization process in Brazil. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 228-44 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
"This chapter analyses the regional and urban effects of industrial location policies in Brazil over the last three decades.... Two main sections of this chapter are concerned with the relations between regional industrialization and urban subsystems. The first discusses the objectives, instruments and efficacy of industrial location policy in Brazil.... The second section presents some thoughts about three cases of industrial policy in Brazil and their impact on the urban subsystem in which they were set."
Correspondence: P. R. Haddad, Universidad Federal de Minas Gerais, Faculdate de Ciencias Económicas, Rua Curitiba 832, 30 000 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30082 Jones, Gavin W.; Visaria, Pravin. Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India. International Studies in Demography, ISBN 0-19-828974-X. LC 97-3707. 1997. xvii, 354 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
This book is a collection of papers by various authors; many of the papers were originally presented at an IUSSP seminar in Ahmedabad, India, in September 1989. "This book analyses urbanization trends and issues in the four largest developing countries--China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil, whose total population of 2.4 billion constitutes over 40 per cent of the world's population.... The reason for including them in the one book, aside from their sheer size and importance on the world scene, is the important commonalities in the urban and regional planning issues they face, due to their large territory. Consequent issues of leading and lagging regions, regional urban networks and their integration with the regional rural economy, and decentralization of planning and administration...attain a particular importance in these territorially extensive countries."
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, 34 rue des Augustins, 4000 Liège, Belgium. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30083 Jones, Gavin W.; Visaria, Pravin. Urbanization of the third world giants. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 1-23 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
The authors summarize the aims of the articles in this volume, which focus on urbanization trends in China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. The situations in the four countries are compared. Sections are included on the demographic background to urbanization, the growth of major metropolitan regions, and the blurring of the urban-rural distinction.
Correspondence: G. W. Jones, Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Division of Demography and Sociology, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30084 Laquian, Aprodicio A. The effects of national urban strategy and regional development policy on patterns of urban growth in China. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 52-68 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
The author examines China's national urban policy and regional development strategy since 1979, with a focus on the resulting changes in urban growth patterns. "First, there has been a higher level of urbanization.... Second, there has been an increase in the share of urban dwellers in small towns and cities vis-à-vis big cities and metropolitan areas. Third, the rate of urbanization in coastal regions has accelerated, widening the development gap between the coast and China's interior regions."
Correspondence: A. Laquian, University of British Columbia, Centre for Human Settlements, School of Community and Regional Planning, 2206 East Mall, British Columbia V6T 1Z3, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30085 Li, Jing Neng. Structural and spatial economic changes and their effects on recent urbanization in China. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 31-51 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
"The economic reforms begun in China in 1979 have had profound effects on the development of the Chinese economy and population, generating many structural and spatial economic changes. Studies of their implications for China's urbanization, as well as deeper analysis of the patterns of urbanization in China's different regions, are therefore needed, despite the serious data problems confronting such an analysis." The author presents an overview of China's economic changes since 1979 and discusses structural changes in the rural economy and labor force; the recent rapid development of urbanization; and spatial distribution of urban population and patterns of urbanization.
Correspondence: J. N. Li, Nankai University, Institute of Population and Development Research, 94 Weijin Road, Tianjin 30071, China. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30086 Rondinelli, Dennis A.; Vastag, Gyula. Urban economic growth in the 21st century: assessing the international competitiveness of metropolitan areas. In: Migration, urbanization, and development: new directions and issues, edited by Richard E. Bilsborrow. 1998. 469-514 pp. United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]: New York, New York; Kluwer Academic: Dordrecht, Netherlands. In Eng.
"Given the growing importance of international trade and investment in urban economic vitality and the potential impacts on population distribution and migration in the 21st century, we develop and test a model for assessing the international competitiveness of metropolitan areas. In Section A, we describe the global factors affecting the international competitiveness of cities and metropolitan areas. In Section B, we review alternative methodologies for measuring urban economic characteristics. In Section C, we offer an operational model for assessing the international competitiveness of metropolitan areas that can help policymakers identify urban centers that are likely to grow economically and to gauge the potential impacts on population distribution and migration. We then demonstrate the results of the model applied to 11 metropolitan areas in Asia, North America, and Europe; explore the implications for developing countries; and identify issues requiring further research on the potential impacts of the international competitiveness of metropolitan areas on migration and urban population growth."
Correspondence: D. A. Rondinelli, University of North Carolina, Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise, University Square 300A/CB No. 8120, Chapel Hill, NC 27516-3997. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30087 Rowland, Richard H. Metropolitan population change in Russia and the Former Soviet Union, 1897-1997. Post-Soviet Geography and Economics, Vol. 39, No. 5, May 1998. 271-96 pp. Palm Beach, Florida. In Eng.
The author "assesses metropolitan population trends in Russia and the FSU [Former Soviet Union] over the period 1897-1997, focusing on the most recent period 1970-1997. The paper also examines internal population shifts within metropolitan areas--defined as an area of over one million in population consisting of a central city plus other urban centers of over 15,000 [people] within a 50-mile radius. Metropolitan processes in Russia and the FSU are compared with those in other major world metropolitan areas...."
Correspondence: R. H. Rowland, California State University, Department of Geography, 5500 University Parkway, San Bernardino, CA 92407-2397. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

64:30088 Salvo, Joseph J.; Lobo, Arun P. Immigration and the changing demographic profile of New York. In: The city and the world: New York's global future, edited by Margaret E. Crahan and Alberto Vourvoulias-Bush. 1997. 88-109 pp. Council on Foreign Relations: New York, New York. In Eng.
The authors describe how immigration has affected the characteristics of the population of New York City over time. The primary focus is on the period since 1965. The impact of changes in migration policy on the city is considered.
Correspondence: J. J. Salvo, New York City Planning Commission, 22 Reade Street, New York, NY 10007. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30089 Sawyer, Donald. Urbanization of the Brazilian frontier. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 245-57 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
The author discusses urbanization in the Amazon region of Brazil, "attempting to explain the process under way in the Amazon in the context of broader changes in Brazil as a whole and their interplay with the region's particular ecological and historical characteristics. The chapter describes levels and trends of urbanization in frontier regions, discusses causes of non-metropolitan urbanization, explains the specific characteristics of pioneer urbanization, and suggests some general conclusions."
Correspondence: D. Sawyer, Federal University of Minas Gerais, CEDEPLAR, Graduate Program in Demography, Rua Curitiba 832, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30090 Skeldon, Ronald. Urbanization and migration in the ESCAP region. Asia-Pacific Population Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, Mar 1998. 3-24 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng.
"This article groups urban areas in the ESCAP region by their characteristics in order to provide comparisons and policy-relevant differences in the pattern of urbanization from one part of the region to another. It also examines the significance of migration as a component of urban growth. The article concludes by drawing out a number of implications of these factors for policy purposes."
Correspondence: R. Skeldon, Mahidol University, Institute for Population and Social Research, 25/25 Puthamontol, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30091 South, Scott J.; Crowder, Kyle D. Residential mobility between cities and suburbs: race, suburbanization, and back-to-the-city moves. Demography, Vol. 34, No. 4, Nov 1997. 525-38 pp. Silver Spring, Maryland. In Eng.
"Information from the 1979 to 1985 waves of the [U.S.] Panel Study of Income Dynamics is merged with data on respondents' tract and metropolitan area of residence to examine patterns and determinants of residential mobility between central cities and suburbs. Consistent with the life-cycle model of residential mobility, mobility in both directions declines with age, but on balance the presence of young children deters moving to the suburbs. Among blacks, education increases the probability of moving from cities to suburbs, while high income retains blacks and whites in suburbs. Consistent with the place stratification model, blacks are substantially less likely than whites to move from cities to suburbs, and substantially more likely to move from suburbs to cities, even after standardizing for racial differences in sociodemographic characteristics. High levels of violent crime and unemployment in cities relative to suburbs also tend to spur city-to-suburb mobility or inhibit suburb-to-city moves."
Correspondence: S. J. South, State University of New York, Department of Sociology, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222. E-mail: s.south@albany.edu. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30092 Visaria, Pravin. Urbanization in India: an overview. In: Urbanization in large developing countries: China, Indonesia, Brazil, and India, edited by Gavin W. Jones and Pravin Visaria. 1997. 266-88 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England; International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]: Liège, Belgium. In Eng.
The author reviews recent urbanization trends in India. Aspects considered include levels of and interstate differences in urbanization; growth levels of cities and small towns; components of urban growth; urban employment levels; urban-rural differentials in productivity; and housing supply and conditions.
Correspondence: P. Visaria, Gujarat Institute of Development Research, Gota, Ahmedabad 382 481, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30093 Zhu, Yu. Spatial effects of "informal urbanization" in China: the case of Fujian province. Asia-Pacific Population Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, Mar 1998. 25-44 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng.
"The development of township and village enterprises and the increase in temporary residents have been two forms of `informal urbanization' in China since the 1980s. The article reveals that this phenomenon has some important spatial effects on the country's urbanization, which could not be identified by analysing conventional data. It concludes that this type of urbanization will lead to a much more decentralized urban system than conventional analysis would suggest."
Correspondence: Y. Zhu, Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Demography Program, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. E-mail: zhu300@coombs.anu.edu.au. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

C.3. Rural Spatial Distribution

Studies of agricultural and farming populations.

64:30094 Beale, Calvin. Nonmetro population rebound continues and broadens. Rural Conditions and Trends, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1996. 8-12 pp. Herndon, Virginia. In Eng.
"As the decade of the 1990s has progressed, the nonmetro [U.S.] population has received a substantial net influx of people, leading to sharp reduction in the number of counties with population decline.... A third of the nonmetro counties grew at a rate higher than the Nation as a whole (5.6 percent) from 1990-95, and such counties had three-fourths of all nonmetro growth.... Among major regions, nonmetro population growth continued to be much faster in the West than elsewhere...."
Correspondence: C. Beale, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Resources and Technology Division, Economic Research Service, Washington, D.C. E-mail: cbeale@econ.ag.gov. Location: Cornell University Library, Ithaca, NY.

64:30095 Johnson, Nan E.; Wang, Ching-li. Changing rural social systems: adaptation and survival. ISBN 0-87013-470-1. LC 96-39877. 1997. x, 255 pp. Michigan State University Press: East Lansing, Michigan. In Eng.
This collection of articles by various authors is concerned with the following questions: "How have two rural social systems (the familial and the occupational systems) changed? What have been the demographic responses? How does theory help us to understand these dual transitions?" The geographical scope is worldwide.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Michigan State University Press, East Lansing, MI 48823-5202. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

64:30096 Rathge, Richard W. The transmission of information regarding population change in a rural county. In: Changing rural social systems: adaptation and survival, edited by Nan E. Johnson and Ching-li Wang. 1997. 155-72 pp. Michigan State University Press: East Lansing, Michigan. In Eng.
"This case study explores the transmission of information regarding the effects of population growth on a rural county system [in Michigan]. An appropriate starting point for examining information exchange is the rural press.... My aim is to detail the amount and type of coverage given to issues associated with population change in a rural turnaround county over a nine-year period. The analysis offers insight into the knowledge base residents and decisionmakers develop from issues and events articulated in the rural newspaper."
Correspondence: R. W. Rathge, North Dakota State University, Department of Sociology, Fargo, ND 58105. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


Copyright © 1998, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.