Volume 62 - Number 2 - Summer 1996

O. The Production of Population Statistics

Studies concerned with the actual production of basic population data. Includes more than governmental publications.

O.1. Population Statistics, General Aspects

Studies on the collection of general demographic statistics and related problems such as studies on data processing.

62:20766 Bonnett, Graham. Data sources for immigration researchers. Australian Economic Review, No. 110, Apr-Jun 1995. 121-7 pp. Parkville, Australia. In Eng.
"The [Australian] Bureau of Immigration, Multicultural and Population Research (BIMPR) was established in 1989 as an independent, professional research body within the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs (DIEA)....The BIMPRs statistical activities include conducting its own surveys as well as acquiring and analysing data from other sources, primarily the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Set out [in this article] is information about the major sources of data used in BIMPR research."
Correspondence: G. Bonnett, Bureau of Immigration, Multicultural and Population Research, P.O. Box 659, South Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

62:20767 Messite, Jacqueline; Stellman, Steven D. Accuracy of death certificate completion: the need for formalized physician training. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 275, No. 10, Mar 13, 1996. 794-6 pp. Chicago, Illinois. In Eng.
The extent to which physician training and experience affect the accuracy of death certificate completion in the United States is assessed. The data were collected in a classroom setting from a group of 12 general internists, 21 internal medical residents, and 35 senior medical students. "The overall level of agreement between underlying cause of death reported by the three groups of participants and the correct cause was 56.9% for internists, 56.0% for residents, and 55.7% for medical students, although agreement varied with the type of case, ranging from 15% to 99%....If the misclassification observed in this pilot study were widespread, it would imply a substantial underreporting of mortality from both circulatory diseases and diabetes. These data strongly support the need to include training in death certificate completion as part of physician education."
Correspondence: J. Messite, New York Academy of Medicine, Office of Public Health, 1216 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029. Location: Princeton University Library (SZ).

O.2. Registration of Vital Statistics

Studies of the organization and operation of vital statistics at local and national levels, of international comparability, and of special problems.

62:20768 International Institute for Vital Registration and Statistics [IIVRS] (Bethesda, Maryland). Organization of national civil registration and vital statistics systems: an update. IIVRS Technical Paper, No. 63, Dec 1995. 30 pp. Bethesda, Maryland. In Eng.
"This report is essentially an update of the study of the organization of national civil registration and vital statistics systems based on a questionnaire survey made in 1984....The response rate...for the vital statistics questionnaire was significantly higher than that for civil registration. Also, there was considerable variation in the response rates by region. As expected, the response rate was high for the European countries. Almost all the vital statistics offices in North America returned completed questionnaires whereas most of the registration offices in the Caribbean area failed to respond."
Correspondence: International Institute for Vital Registration and Statistics, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3998. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20769 Kelodjoue, Samuel. Comparative analysis of deaths registered in the civil registration of Cameroon: the case of the mayoralties of Yaounde (1986-1993). IIVRS Technical Paper, No. 62, Oct 1995. 15 pp. International Institute for Vital Registration and Statistics [IIVRS]: Bethesda, Maryland. In Eng.
"This study begins with a brief discussion of the sources of demographic data in Cameroon and the irreplaceable role of civil registration in the collection of data on population change. Then, based on an analysis of death registers for the period 1986-1993 in the civil registration centers of the city of Yaounde (the capital of Cameroon, with over one million inhabitants in 1994), it attempts to evaluate the completeness of death registration, its consistency, its quality, and its limitations; and arrives at the conclusion that the level of completeness remains very low (about 35 percent) and that urban customs do not yet significantly affect the reporting of deaths to the civil registration as they do in some other African cities at a similar level of development....The study suggests some possible ways to improve the coverage rate and presents a model form for collecting information on deaths so that the death certificate may become a basic instrument in the production of death statistics in Cameroon."
Correspondence: International Institute for Vital Registration and Statistics, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3998. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20770 Silva, Letícia K.; Russomano, Fábio B. Underreporting of maternal deaths in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: comparison of two notification systems. [Sub-registro da mortalidade materna no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil: comparação de dois sistemas de informação.] Boletín de la Oficina Sanitaria Panamericana, Vol. 120, No. 1, Jan 1996. 36-43 pp. Washington, D.C. In Spa. with sum. in Eng.
"Two notification systems were compared to estimate maternal death underreporting for 1988 in eight public maternity clinics of Rio de Janeiro [Brazil]. The death rates obtained were compared with the corrected maternal death rate (13.9 per 10,000 live births), which represented all deaths validated by either system. The system based on hospital discharge records yielded a maternal death rate of 11.6 per 10,000 live births, or 16% underreporting when compared with the corrected death rate....The system based on death certificates, including `presumed' maternal deaths, presented a rate of 6.6 per 10,000 live births, with 52% underreporting in relation to the corrected rate. The official death rate, based on maternal deaths as declared in death certificates, underreported by 60% compared to the corrected death rate. When the two systems were compared with each other, the one based on death certificates showed 62% underreporting in relation to that based on hospital discharge forms."
Correspondence: L. K. Silva, Rua Leopoldo Bulhões 1480, 7o andar, Manguinhos, CEP 21041-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20771 Starr, Paul; Starr, Sandra. Reinventing vital statistics: the impact of changes in information technology, welfare policy, and health care. Public Health Reports, Vol. 110, No. 5, Sep-Oct 1995. 534-44 pp. Boston, Massachusetts. In Eng.
"Vital statistics offers a case study in the potential of new information technology and reengineering to achieve better public sector performance. New technology--notably the shift from a paper to an electronic process for recording vital events and transmitting the data to public agencies--is creating opportunities to produce more timely, accurate, and useful information....On the basis of a State-by-State survey of vital statistics officials, the authors estimate that at the end of 1994, 58 percent of all births in the United States were being recorded on an electronic birth certificate and communicated to a public agency electronically. Nearly all respondents reported that the electronic birth certificate brought improvements in both timeliness and accuracy of data. Achieving the full promise of the new technology, however, will require more fundamental changes in institutions and policies and a reconceptualization of the birth certificate as part of a broader perinatal information system."
Correspondence: P. Starr, Princeton University, Department of Sociology, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20772 Weed, James A. Vital statistics in the United States: preparing for the next century. Population Index, Vol. 61, No. 4, Winter 1995. 527-39 pp. Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
"This paper outlines the development of U.S. national vital statistics based on the local registration of vital events in the United States during the twentieth century, including the organization of the National Vital Statistics System. Current data developments and selected publications of the National Center for Health Statistics are presented as they relate to vital statistics. The paper concludes with an overview of ongoing efforts at the local, state, and federal levels to improve the timeliness and quality of vital statistics through the redesign and automation of data collection, processing, and dissemination systems."
Correspondence: J. A. Weed, National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Room 840, Hyattsville, MD 20782. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

O.3. Population Censuses and Registers

Studies of the organization and operation of population censuses and registers at local and national levels, of international comparability, and of special problems.

62:20773 Bryant, Barbara E.; Dunn, William. Moving power and money: the politics of census taking. ISBN 0-9628092-7-6. LC 95-67315. 1995. 234 pp. New Strategist Publications: Ithaca, New York. In Eng.
This book, written by the director of the 1990 U.S. census, concerns the issue of the government's need to know and how this need affects the right to privacy. The author also discusses how flawed or inadequate governmental data could harm the country's future. "This book is a behind-the-scenes look at the role of the Census Bureau in the highly political, complex, and surprisingly dramatic census-taking process. [It] also examines the players involved, not just at the Census Bureau, but on Capitol Hill, in city halls, the media, special-interest groups, and--most important of all--the American people."
Correspondence: New Strategist Publications, P.O. Box 242, Ithaca, NY 14851. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20774 Czibulka, Zoltán. Microcensus, 1996. [Mikrocenzus, 1996.] Statisztikai Szemle, Vol. 74, No. 1, Jan 1996. 5-15 pp. Budapest, Hungary. In Hun. with sum. in Eng.
Details are presented concerning the Hungarian microcensus scheduled for April 1, 1996. The author reviews the history of census taking in the country and the topics covered in past censuses. A discussion of relevant issues concerning census methodology is also included.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20775 Harala, Riitta. Evaluation of the results of the register-based population and housing census 1990 in Finland. Statistical Journal of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1995. 63-72 pp. Amsterdam, Netherlands. In Eng.
"The 1990 population and housing census was the first one in Finland to be conducted entirely on the basis of registers, without any questionnaires. The Finnish population census system draws on the basic administrative registers of the society giving data on the population census target units and the links between them. These units comprise individuals, families, households, buildings, dwellings, enterprises and establishments. Transferring from one data collection method to another inevitably causes some kind of break in the time series. Because of these breaks it was decided in Statistics Finland to carry out an extensive evaluation study to analyse the differences between questionnaire-based and register-based census data."
Correspondence: R. Harala, Tilastokeskus, Population Statistics, 00022 Helsinki, Finland. Location: Princeton University Library (UN).

62:20776 Mallee, Hein. China's household registration system under reform. Development and Change, Vol. 26, No. 1, Jan 1995. 1-29 pp. Oxford, England. In Eng.
"China's household registration system is the central element in a policy of rapid industrialization with low urbanization. Figures on the non-agricultural population show that the system was initially successful, but less so during the 1980s. As a result, a number of reforms were introduced, which are described in some detail here. The registration system must be viewed as playing three interrelated roles: it is an instrument of development policy, aimed at keeping urban populations small while fostering industrial development; a social institution which rigidly divides Chinese society into a rural and an urban segment; and an instrument of state control, which the state employs to cultivate client groups. This article further argues that the contradiction between the need to adapt the system to changing realities, dictated by its developmental role, and the tenacity of the vested interests inherent in the social institutional role of the system, form a major obstacle to fundamental reform."
Correspondence: H. Mallee, University of Leiden, Centre of Non-Western Studies, P.O. Box 9515, 2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

62:20777 Mikhailov, E. On subject-matter, methodological, and organizational guidelines of the All-Russian Census of Population of 1999. [O programmno-metodologicheskikh i organizatsionnykh polozheniyakh Vserossiiskoi Perepisi Naseleniya 1999 goda.] Voprosy Statistiki, No. 1, 1996. 14-30, 81 pp. Moscow, Russia. In Rus. with sum. in Eng.
This article, written by the Head of the department responsible for preparing the 1999 Russian census, first summarizes current demographic trends in the country. The main emphasis is on initiating a debate on methodological issues concerning the upcoming census, particularly on topics such as migration, households and families, ethnic and national groups, age and sex composition, and labor force activities. The paper is followed by a discussion of these topics (pp. 24-30).
Correspondence: E. Mikhailov, Goskomstat Rossii, Izmailovskoe Shosse 44, 105679 Moscow, Russia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20778 Namibia. Central Statistics Office (Windhoek, Namibia). Republic of Namibia, 1991 population and housing census. Administrative and methodological report. Aug 1994. [xii, 228] pp. Windhoek, Namibia. In Eng.
This report describes the methodology used in the 1991 census of Namibia. It also includes selected data from the census.
Correspondence: Central Statistics Office, National Planning Commission, Private Bag 13356, Windhoek, Namibia. Location: Northwestern University Library, Evanston, IL.

62:20779 Shrestha, Laura B.; Preston, Samuel H. Consistency of census and vital registration data on older Americans: 1970-1990. Survey Methodology, Vol. 21, No. 2, Dec 1995. 167-77 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This paper reports the results from a test of data quality applied to United States data for two intercensal periods: 1970-1980 and 1980-1990. In particular, [the authors] examine the consistency of reported changes in the size of a cohort between two censuses and the recorded number of intercensal deaths for that cohort, with allowance for intercensal cohort migration. All data refer to the population in single years of age and separate tests are conducted for the black and white populations."
Correspondence: L. B. Shrestha, World Bank, Human Development Department, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20433. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20780 Simpson, Stephen; Dorling, Daniel. Those missing millions: implications for social statistics of non-response to the 1991 census. Journal of Social Policy, Vol. 23, No. 4, Oct 1994. 543-67 pp. Cambridge, England. In Eng.
"This article highlights some of the issues raised by incomplete coverage of the 1991 census in Britain, illustrating how far-reaching are its implications across the spectrum of social statistics. The origins and the current state-of-play of the debate over the distribution of the non-response are summarised and the implications then assessed....A rough estimate is made, and supporting evidence presented, of the possible numbers of households which were missed by the census. Some implications for housing needs assessments are illustrated along with the effect of the sudden upwards revision of official estimates of the dwelling stock and the resulting overall great uncertainty over the number of vacant dwellings in the country. Finally, recent research on the electoral implications of people's choice not to be registered is discussed as this may well help to understand census non-response."
Correspondence: S. Simpson, City of Bradford Metropolitan Council, Chief Executive's Office, Bradford, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

62:20781 Thygesen, Lars. The register-based system of demographic and social statistics in Denmark. Statistical Journal of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1995. 49-55 pp. Amsterdam, Netherlands. In Eng.
"Denmark has developed a statistical system where a large portion of official statistics is based on administrative registers. Population and Housing Censuses have been replaced by register based statistics since 1981. The key of the system is the unique Person Number used in all public administrations. A large number of registers is used as sources and is linked together in order to compile the best estimates of the statistical concepts. This allows for high quality statistics that are timely, consistent and well-suited for longitudinal studies. Problems of quality may arise from changes in the legislation or in the registers. A strong data protection policy is necessary in order to preserve the system."
Correspondence: L. Thygesen, Danmarks Statistik, Sejrøgade 11, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. Location: Princeton University Library (UN).

62:20782 United States. Bureau of the Census (Washington, D.C.). 1990 census of population and housing. Guide: Part A. Text. No. 1990 CPH-R-1A, Sep 1992. v, 119, [60] pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The guide to the 1990 U.S. census is in three parts. "This one--Part A. Text--deals with such topics as questions asked in the census, data products available to users, and assistance offered by the Census Bureau and other organizations. It furnishes the information a user needs to determine the types of data presented and areas for which statistics are reported. It also discusses basic technical considerations relating to machine-readable products and provides the user with a practical understanding of the data."
Correspondence: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. 20402-9328. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20783 United States. Bureau of the Census (Washington, D.C.). 1990 census of population and housing. Guide: Part B. Glossary. No. 1990 CPH-R-1B, Jan 1993. iv, 74, [15] pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The guide to the 1990 U.S. census is in three parts. Part B, the glossary, "is divided into four sections containing definitions and explanations of geographic area classifications, population characteristics, housing characteristics, and other technical terms associated with the census and its data products. An important additional section is the Index of Terms, and alphabetic index covering all the terms in the other sections."
Correspondence: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. 20402-9328. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

O.4. Surveys

Studies of periodic or special surveys relevant to population studies, excluding KAP (knowledge, attitudes, and practice of family planning) studies, which are coded under F.4.4. Attitudes Toward Fertility and Fertility Control .

62:20784 Acharya, Sanghmitra; Nangia, Parveen; Paswan, Balram; Prasad, Rajiva; Sureender, S.; Unisa, Sayeed; Gupta, Kamla. National Family Health Survey (MCH and family planning): northeastern states (Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura), 1993. Dec 1995. xxvii, 334 pp. International Institute for Population Sciences [IIPS]: Bombay, India. In Eng.
This report is one in a series presenting results at the state level from the National Family Health Survey carried out in India in 1992-1993. The report concerns the six small northeastern states of India, where the survey included 6,266 ever-married women aged 13 to 49 years. Among those surveyed, 882 were from Arunachal Pradesh, 953 from Manipur, 1,137 from Meghalaya, 1,045 from Mizoram, 1,149 from Nagaland, and 1,100 from Tripura. A number of their children born in the four years preceding the survey were also included. Most of the results are presented separately for the individual states concerned. Following chapters on survey methodology, there are chapters on nuptiality, fertility, family planning, fertility preferences, morbidity and mortality, maternal and child health, infant feeding and child nutrition, and knowledge of AIDS.
Correspondence: International Institute for Population Sciences, Govandi Station Road, Deonar, Bombay 400 088, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20785 Bhat, Bashir A.; Khan, Bashir A.; Deshpande, A. P.; Luther, Norman Y.; Lahiri, Subrata. National Family Health Survey (MCH and family planning): Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir, 1993. Nov 1995. xxvii, 282 pp. University of Kashmir, Population Research Centre: Srinagar, India; International Institute for Population Sciences [IIPS]: Bombay, India. In Eng.
This is one in a series of state-level reports presenting results from the 1992-1993 National Family Health Survey of India. This report concerns six districts in the Jammu region. It involves a representative sample of 2,766 ever-married women aged 13-49 from 2,839 households, and 1,540 of their children born during the four years preceding the survey. After introductory chapters describing survey methodology, there are chapters on nuptiality, fertility, family planning, fertility preferences, morbidity and mortality, maternal and child health, infant feeding and child nutrition, and village profiles.
Correspondence: International Institute for Population Sciences, Govandi Station Road, Deonar, Bombay 400 088, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20786 Cayemittes, Michel; Rival, Antonio; Barrère, Bernard; Lerebours, Gérald; Gédéon, Michaèle A. Survey of Mortality, Morbidity, and Use of Services (EMMUS-II), Haiti, 1994/1995. [Enquête Mortalité, Morbidité et Utilisation des Services (EMMUS-II), Haïti, 1994/95.] Dec 1995. xxii, 364 pp. Institut Haïtien de l'Enfance: Pétionville, Haiti; Macro International, Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS]: Calverton, Maryland. In Fre.
Results are presented from a survey carried out in Haiti in 1994-1995 as part of the Demographic and Health Surveys program. The survey included 4,818 households, from which 5,709 women and 1,767 men were interviewed. Following chapters describing survey methodology, there are chapters on fertility, family planning, nuptiality and exposure to the risk of pregnancy, fertility preferences, maternal and child health, breast-feeding and infant nutrition, infant mortality, causes of infant death, sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS, the availability of health services, and conclusions and recommendations.
Correspondence: Institut Haïtien de l'Enfance, 41 Rue Borno, P.O. Box 15606, Pétionville, Haiti. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20787 Centro de Estudios de Población y Paternidad Responsable [CEPAR] (Quito, Ecuador); United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] (Atlanta, Georgia). Ecuador: Demographic and Maternal and Child Health Survey, ENDEMAIN-94. Final results. [Ecuador: Encuesta Demográfica y de Salud Materna e Infantil, ENDEMAIN-94. Informe final.] Jul 1995. [xxiii], 248, [60] pp. Quito, Ecuador. In Spa.
This report presents the results of the fifth in a series of surveys undertaken in Ecuador. The survey, which was funded by USAID, was carried out between 1993 and 1995. It involved a nationally representative sample of 13,582 women aged 15 to 49. Following chapters on survey methods, there are chapters on fertility, fertility control, nuptiality and exposure to the risk of pregnancy, fertility preferences, young women (aged 15 to 24), infant and child mortality, maternal mortality, maternal health, infant and child health, breast-feeding, and education of children.
Correspondence: Centro de Estudios de Población y Paternidad Responsable, Toribio Montes 423 y Daniel Hidalgo, Casilla No. 17-01-2327, Quito, Ecuador. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20788 Clairin, Rémy; Brion, Philippe. Survey manuals: applications to developing countries. [Manuel de sondages: applications aux pays en développement.] Documents et Manuels du CEPED, No. 3, ISBN 2-87762-082-4. Feb 1996. xii, 104 pp. Centre Français sur la Population et le Développement [CEPED]: Paris, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"The object of this manual, which is resulting from a project initiated by Rémy Clairin and, originally, dedicated to demographic surveys in African countries, is to present the theoretical principles [of sampling methods] in a simple manner, and to link them to the practical problems, particularly using examples based on sample surveys conducted in developing countries."
Correspondence: Centre Français sur la Population et le Développement, 15 rue de l'Ecole de Médecine, 75270 Paris Cedex 06, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20789 Katus, Kalev; Puur, Allan; Sakkeus, Luule; Silver, Brian. Estonian Family and Fertility Survey: methodological report. [Eesti Pere- ja Sündimusuuring: metodoloogiaülevaade.] Eesti Rahvastikustatistika/Population Statistics of Estonia, RU Seeria A, No. 39, ISBN 9985-820-24-X. 1995. 68, [132] pp. Estonian Interuniversity Population Research Centre: Tallinn, Estonia. In Eng; Est.
This report describes the methodology used in the Estonian Family and Fertility Survey. The survey was carried out in 1994 as part of the 1990 series of European family and fertility surveys. It includes sections on the survey instrument, sampling procedures, data collection and coding, data entry, and editing. The text of the survey questionnaire is provided in Estonian, Russian, and English.
For a report providing results from this survey, see elsewhere in this issue.
Correspondence: Estonian Interuniversity Population Research Centre, P.O. Box 3012, 0090 Tallinn, Estonia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20790 Katus, Kalev; Puur, Allan; Sakkeus, Luule. Estonian Family and Fertility Survey: standard tabulations. [Eesti Pere- ja Sündimusuuring: standardtabelid.] Eesti Rahvastikustatistika/Population Statistics of Estonia, RU Seeria C, No. 6, ISBN 9985-820-18-5. 1995. xxxviii, 111 pp. Estonian Interuniversity Population Research Centre: Tallinn, Estonia. In Eng; Est.
The results of the first national survey in Estonia on the family and fertility are presented in this report. The survey was developed as one in the series of European surveys carried out around 1990. It involved a nationally representative sample of about 5,000 women aged 20 to 69 in 1994. "The volume starts with tabulations on household characteristics and parental home, proceeds with tables on partnership, fertility, pregnancy and abortion histories, fertility regulation and childbearing plans, and ends with migration and activity history, and summary biographical indicators. Given the underlying approach of the study, in each section the tables address the prevalence, timing and sequencing of events to provide, by means of a set of relevant demographic indicators, an insight into the life-courses of Estonian female generations since the late 1920s." Most of the data are presented separately for the population as a whole and for the native-born population.
For a methodological report on this survey, see elsewhere in this issue.
Correspondence: Estonian Interuniversity Population Research Centre, P.O. Box 3012, 0090 Tallinn, Estonia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20791 Macro International. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Calverton, Maryland). Model "A" questionnaire: with commentary for high contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS-III Basic Documentation, No. 1, Dec 1995. vi, 83 pp. Calverton, Maryland. In Eng.
This document introduces the revised questionnaire developed for the third round of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). This version is for use in countries with high contraceptive prevalence. An alternative version for use in low-prevalence countries is cited elsewhere in this issue. The primary aims of the DHS are "(1) estimating levels of fertility and infant and child mortality; (2) estimating durations of breastfeeding and other proximate determinants of fertility; (3) measuring contraceptive knowledge and use, contraceptive availability and acceptability, effectiveness of methods, and discontinuation rates; (4) assessing unmet need for family planning; (5) identifying reasons for nonuse of contraception and measuring levels of unwanted fertility; (6) measuring preferences for additional children; (7) measuring the prevalence of childhood diseases and assessing treatment patterns; (8) estimating coverage rates for maternity care and childhood vaccinations; (9) assessing nutritional status of women and children; and (10) assessing infant feeding practices."
Correspondence: Macro International, Demographic and Health Surveys, 11785 Beltsville Drive, Suite 300, Calverton, MD 20705-3119. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20792 Macro International. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Calverton, Maryland). Model "B" questionnaire: with commentary for low contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS-III Basic Documentation, No. 2, Dec 1995. vi, 80 pp. Calverton, Maryland. In Eng.
This document introduces the revised questionnaire developed for the third round of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). This version is for use in countries with low contraceptive prevalence. An alternative version for use in high-prevalence countries is cited elsewhere in this issue.
Correspondence: Macro International, Demographic and Health Surveys, 11785 Beltsville Drive, Suite 300, Calverton, MD 20705-3119. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20793 Nanda, A. K.; Malhi, Prahbhjot; Kaur, Kuldip; Ramesh, B. M.; Verma, Ravi K.; Kumar, Sushil. National Family Health Survey (MCH and family planning): Punjab, 1993. Sep 1995. xxvi, 296 pp. Population Research Centre, Centre for Research in Rural and Industrial Development: Chandigarh, India; International Institute for Population Sciences [IIPS]: Bombay, India. In Eng.
This report is one in a series of state-level surveys carried out in India as part of the National Family Health Survey of 1992-1993. The Punjab survey, conducted in 1993, included a representative sample of 2,995 ever-married women aged 13-49 from 3,213 households as well as 1,470 of their children born during the four years preceding the survey. In addition to chapters on survey methodology, chapters are included on nuptiality, fertility, family planning, fertility preferences, morbidity and mortality, maternal and child health, infant feeding and child nutrition, and a village profile.
Correspondence: International Institute for Population Sciences, Govandi Station Road, Deonar, Bombay 400 088, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20794 Ordoñez, Myriam; Ochoa, Luis H.; Ojeda, Gabriel; Rojas, Guillermo; Gómez, Luis C.; Samper, Belén. National Demographic and Health Survey, 1995. [Encuesta Nacional de Demografía y Salud, 1995.] Oct 1995. xxxiv, 233, [40] pp. Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana [PROFAMILIA]: Bogota, Colombia; Macro International, Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS]: Calverton, Maryland. In Spa.
Results are presented from the 1995 Demographic and Health Survey carried out in Colombia. The survey involved a nationally representative sample of 10,935 households and 11,140 eligible women. Following introductory chapters describing the survey and its methodology, there are chapters on fertility, the knowledge and use of contraceptive methods, nuptiality and exposure to risk of pregnancy, fertility preferences, infant and child mortality, maternal and child health, lactation and nutrition, knowledge of AIDS, and domestic violence.
Correspondence: PROFAMILIA, Dirección de Investigación y Evaluación, 14-52 Calle 34, Bogota, Colombia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20795 Population Council (New York, New York). Senegal 1992-93: results from the Demographic and Health Survey. Studies in Family Planning, Vol. 26, No. 6, Nov-Dec 1995. 368-72 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
These are summary results from the 1992-93 Senegal Demographic and Health Survey. The survey covered 3,528 households comprising 6,310 women aged 15-49 and 1,436 men aged 20 and over. Tabular data are presented on population characteristics, fertility, fertility preferences, contraceptive use, marital and contraceptive status, postpartum variables, infant mortality, disease prevention and treatment, and nutritional status.
Correspondence: Population Council, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20796 Population Council (New York, New York). Zimbabwe 1994: results from the Demographic and Health Survey. Studies in Family Planning, Vol. 27, No. 1, Jan-Feb 1996. 52-6 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
These are the summary results from the 1994 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey, which covered 5,984 households, 6,128 women aged 15-49, and 2,141 men aged 15-54. Tabular data are provided on population characteristics, fertility and fertility preferences, current contraceptive use, marital and contraceptive status, postpartum variables, infant mortality, disease prevention and treatment, and nutrition.
Correspondence: Population Council, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

62:20797 Sombo, N'Cho; Kouassi, Lucien; Koffi, Albert K.; Schoemaker, Juan; Barrère, Monique; Barrère, Bernard; Poukouta, Prosper. Ivory Coast Demographic and Health Survey, 1994. [Enquête Démographique et de Santé Côte d'Ivoire, 1994.] Dec 1995. xxii, 294 pp. Institut National de la Statistique: Abidjan, Ivory Coast; Macro International, Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS]: Calverton, Maryland. In Fre.
Results are presented from the 1994 Demographic and Health Survey carried out in the Ivory Coast. The survey included 5,935 households, from which 8,099 women and 2,552 men were interviewed. Following introductory chapters on the country's background and the methodology of the survey, there are chapters on fertility, family planning, nuptiality and exposure to the risk of pregnancy, fertility preferences, maternal and child health, breast-feeding and nutritional status, infant mortality, maternal mortality, and AIDS.
Correspondence: Macro International, Demographic and Health Surveys, 11785 Beltsville Drive, Calverton, MD 20705-3119. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


Copyright © 1996-1997, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.