Volume 59 - Number 4 - Winter 1993

L. Demographic and Noneconomic Interrelations

Studies concerned with the relations between population factors as a whole and noneconomic factors. Relations affecting a single demographic variable are coded under the variable concerned and not in this division. Studies concerned equally with economic and social factors are coded under K.1.1. General Economic Development and Population .

L.1. General Social Development and Population

Studies on interrelations with education, religion, social change, and socioeconomic status.

59:40636 Farkas, Janice I.; Himes, Christine L. The influence of caregiving and employment on the personal, family, and professional activities of midlife women. Population Research Institute Working Paper, No. 1993-01, Jan 1993. 21 pp. Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute: University Park, Pennsylvania. In Eng.
"The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which midlife women's roles as caregivers to aging parents and parents in-law and as labor force participants impact on their involvement in voluntary activities and their well-being." Data are from the 1988 U.S. National Survey of Families and Households.
Correspondence: Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute, 22 Burrowes Building, University Park, PA 16802-6202. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40637 Friedlander, Dov; Ben-Moshe, Eliahu; Schellekens, Jona; Feldman, Carole. Socioeconomic change, demographic processes, and population aging in Israel's cities and towns: implications for welfare policies. Research Studies Series, No. 37, 1990. 220 pp. Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies: Jerusalem, Israel. In Heb. with sum. in Eng.
The authors examine estimates of population and socioeconomic change for Israel to the year 2017. The emphasis is on demographic aging and its effect on social welfare policies in the country's cities and towns.
Correspondence: Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies, 20a Radek Street, Jerusalem 92186, Israel. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40638 Golini, Antonio; Vivio, Roberta. Demographic aging. Problems and mathematical models for the territorial organization of services for the elderly. [L'invecchiamento della popolazione. Problemi e modelli matematici di organizzazione sul territorio dei servizi di assistenza agli anziani.] Istituto di Ricerche sulla Popolazione Working Paper, No. 07/91, Nov 1991. 54 pp. Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerche sulla Popolazione [IRP]: Rome, Italy. In Ita. with sum. in Eng; Fre.
This study concerns the provision of services to the elderly in a period of demographic aging, with a focus on the situation in Italy.
Correspondence: Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerche sulla Popolazione, Viale Beethoven 56, 00144 Rome, Italy. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40639 Guinnane, Timothy W. The impact of the 1908 Old Age Pensions Act on the aged and the Poor Law in Ireland. OPR Working Paper, No. 93-2, Feb 1993. 30 pp. Princeton University, Office of Population Research [OPR]: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
"This paper uses the introduction of the pension [in 1908] to study generational relations and old-age support in Ireland at the turn of the twentieth century."
Correspondence: Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40640 Kono, Shigemi. Population and women: a study of sex ratios in population and gender differentials in demographic and social participation. Jinko Mondai Kenkyu/Journal of Population Problems, Vol. 49, No. 1, Apr 1993. 1-16 pp. Tokyo, Japan. In Jpn. with sum. in Eng.
Data on women's socioeconomic status and fertility in selected countries are analyzed and compared. The author notes "the existence of some very tenacious discriminatory practices against women in the access to economic and social activities....In some cases, discrimination prevents women from an access to their survival and health. Women, particularly in developing countries, do not receive...equal opportunities...in obtaining economic and social well-being."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40641 LaNoue, George R. The demographic premises of affirmative action. Population and Environment, Vol. 14, No. 5, May 1993. 421-40 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
The author reviews the history of affirmative action programs since their inception during the 1960s in the United States. "The premise of affirmative action in the Sixties was that it was a temporary intervention necessary to help blacks overcome the legacy of slavery and segregation. Three decades later, affirmative action encompasses many other groups and has spread to a wide variety of programs. The growth, diversity, and increasing prosperity of non-black affirmative action groups, however, raises questions about the future role of race and ethnic preferences."
Correspondence: G. R. LaNoue, University of Maryland, Policy Sciences Graduate Program, 5401 Wilkens Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21228. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40642 Lavely, William; Wong, R. Bin. Family division and mobility in north China. Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 34, No. 3, Jul 1992. 439-63 pp. Cambridge, England. In Eng.
The authors examine family division of wealth and social mobility in China. They investigate "the experience of three north China villages surveyed by Japanese researchers in the 1930s and assess this evidence in view of other information on landholding patterns. Our findings amplify and confirm the insights of scholars who have argued that division fragments largeholdings. We offer empirical evidence that reproduction was not uniform across social strata and that classes tended to converge as the result of family division and the demographic processes underlying it."
Correspondence: W. Lavely, University of Washington, Department of Sociology, Seattle, WA 98195. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

59:40643 Merchant, Gulshan K. Women's education, fertility, child mortality and labour force participation: a third world perspective. Pub. Order No. DANN73108. ISBN 0-315-73108-7. 1992. 296 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This dissertation examines the impact of education on various aspects of women's lives in the Gilgit Agency in the northern areas of Pakistan. It was prepared at the University of Alberta, Canada.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(12).

59:40644 Oppong, Christine. ILO standard setting, policy studies and technical cooperation relating to population issues and women. World Employment Programme Research Working Paper: Labour and Population, No. 185, ISBN 92-2-108789-1. Feb 1993. viii, 71 pp. International Labour Office [ILO]: Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng.
"This paper outlines the scope and content of an array of the ILO's past and present standard setting, policy research and technical support services, which focus on women workers, their protection and promotion of equality, and have a latent or manifest link with population issues."
Correspondence: International Labour Office, 4 route des Morillons, 1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40645 Piche, Victor; Mumpasi, Lututala. Social demography in Africa. [Demographie sociale en Afrique.] Cahiers Quebecois de Demographie, Vol. 21, No. 1, Spring 1992. 1-183 pp. Association des Demographes du Quebec: Montreal, Canada. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
This special issue contains eight articles by various authors on the relationship between social and demographic conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa. One paper concerns fertility trends in Haiti.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Association des Demographes du Quebec, C.P. 403, Succursale Cote-des-Nieges, Montreal, Quebec H3S 2S7, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40646 Rank, Mark R.; Hirschl, Thomas A. The link between population density and welfare participation. Demography, Vol. 30, No. 4, Nov 1993. 607-22 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This article explores...the link between population density and welfare participation in the United States. Longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics are used to meet two objectives: first, to test whether a relationship exists between population density and use of the food stamp program among eligible households; second, to explore the potential reasons for such a relationship. Our findings show that population density has a strong, positive impact on the likelihood of participating in the food stamp program."
Correspondence: M. R. Rank, Washington University, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, St. Louis, MO 63130. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40647 Zhan, Jie. A feasibility study on the only-child dual insurance and parental old-age pension systems. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 4, No. 4, 1992. 329-38 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
The prospects for expanding China's only-child insurance scheme into an old-age pension system is explored.
Correspondence: J. Zhan, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Population Research Institute, 5 Jianguomen Nei Da Jie 5 Hao, Beijing, China. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

L.2. Demographic and Political Factors

Studies on the political aspects of population growth, including the demographic impact of war.

59:40648 Dumont, Gerard-Francois. Demography and geopolitics. [Demographie et geopolitique.] Defense Nationale, Vol. 49, No. 4, Apr 1993. 37-54 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
The author examines the effect that demographic factors play in international relations. He considers the influence of population numbers on a series of political events such as the recognition of mainland China and the situation in the Middle East, the importance of spatial distribution and migration, and the implications of differences in the population characteristics of different nations and ethnic groups.
Correspondence: G.-F. Dumont, Universite de Paris I, 12 place du Pantheon, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

59:40649 Keyfitz, Nathan. On the fission of empires. In: Populations in transition. Jun 1993. 21-60 pp. University of Groningen, Population Research Centre: Groningen, Netherlands. In Eng.
This is one of two keynote addresses delivered at the opening of the Population Research Centre at the University of Groningen, Netherlands. The author notes that the worldwide trend throughout the twentieth century has been toward smaller political units. "Demographers as well as the rest of the world will have to take into account, and live with, the resulting instability in geographical boundaries of...political units...."
Correspondence: University of Groningen, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, Population Research Centre, Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40650 Monnier, Alain. Eastern Europe without landmarks. [L'Europe de l'Est sans reperes.] Population et Societes, No. 283, Oct 1993. 1-4 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
The demographic effects of recent political changes in Eastern Europe are summarized. They include the increased pressure of East-West migration, a decline in fertility, and an increase in mortality, particularly in Russia.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40651 Ngondo a Pitshandenge, Iman. Population figures and political stakes under the Second Republic: the legislative elections of 1987. [Chiffre de population en enjeux politiques sous la 2eme Republique: les elections legislatives de 1987.] Zaire-Afrique, No. 264, 1992. 227-48 pp. Kinshasa, Zaire. In Fre.
Using the example of the 1987 legislative elections in Zaire, the author illustrates how it was possible to manipulate population data for the various districts in order to increase representation for those regions that supported the party in power.
Location: Yale University, Sterling Library, New Haven, CT.

59:40652 Rattinger, Hans. Demography and federal elections in Germany, 1953-1990--and beyond. Electoral Studies, Vol. 11, No. 3, Sep 1992. 223-47 pp. Oxford, England. In Eng.
"In recent years growing differences in voting between older and younger voters have been observed in Germany. Cohort analytic techniques are used here in order to break up such differences into those that reflect either life cycle or generational effects on turnout and the vote. The data base is a unique set of official statistics that has been collected in [West] Germany since 1953 by marking a random sample of ballots according to sex and age of voters. The analysis shows that both life cycle and cohort factors have had a significant and systematic impact on turnout and the probability of a vote for each party....The impact of such demographic factors on the electoral performance of the parties from one Bundestag election to the following one is assessed, and a forecast of these effects up to the year 2006 is presented."
Correspondence: H. Rattinger, Universitat Bamberg, Lehrstuhl fur Politikwissenschaft II, Feldkirchenstrasse 21, 8600 Bamberg, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

59:40653 Srb, Vladimir. Population movement in the territory of Czechoslovakia, 1938-1944. [Pohyb obyvatelstva na uzemi Ceskoslovenska 1938-1944.] Demografie, Vol. 35, No. 2, 1993. 73-94 pp. Prague, Czech Republic. In Cze. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
The author reviews Czechoslovakia's political history and compares demographic trends among the four territories into which the country was divided in 1938. The focus is on differences in population growth, migration, and reproductive behavior. The impact of the country's partition on the ethnic makeup of the various divisions is also assessed.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40654 Steinberg, Heinz G. Population trends in Germany during World War II: with an overview of trends from 1945 to 1990. [Die Bevolkerungsentwicklung in Deutschland im Zweiten Weltkrieg: mit einem Uberblick uber die Entwicklung von 1945 bis 1990.] ISBN 3-88557-089-0. 1991. 319 pp. Kulturstiftung der Deutschen Vertriebenen: Bonn, Germany. In Ger.
The effects of World War II on population trends in Germany are analyzed. The emphasis is on regional population trends and the impact of evacuees and refugees. An overview of demographic trends in West and East Germany from 1945 to 1990 is also provided.
Correspondence: Kulturstiftung der Deutschen Vertriebenen, Bonner Talweg 68, 5300 Bonn 1, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40655 Trebici, Vladimir. Genocide and demography. [Genocid si demografie.] Repere Sociologie, No. 2, ISBN 973-28-0218-9. 1991. 160 pp. Humanitas: Bucharest, Romania. In Rum.
The author estimates the number of deaths due to government policies in Romania during the Ceausescu regime, which was in power from 1965 until the uprising of 1989. In addition to the 1,036 persons who died during the uprising, the author examines mortality due to government interdiction of abortion, lack of modern contraceptive methods, and the low standard of living. He concludes that between 400,000 and 500,000 additional deaths can be attributed to Ceausescu policies, both directly and indirectly.
Correspondence: Humanitas, Piata Presei Libere 1, 79734 Bucharest, Romania. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

L.3. Demographic Factors and Health

Studies on nutrition and health, including psychological aspects and sex behavior. Studies that are concerned with the impact of these factors on fertility are coded under F.5. Factors Other Than Contraception Affecting Fertility .

59:40656 Birdsall, Nancy; James, Estelle. Health, government, and the poor: the case for the private sector. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 229-51 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"In this paper, we argue that...there is a case for limited and selective employment of user charges and privatization of health in most developing countries. In the first section we set forth a brief statement of public choice theory, which predicts that, in general, government actions may be neither efficient nor equitable. Instead, they may be directed toward increasing the real income of influential middle- and upper-income groups, often in inefficient ways. The next section draws, as a central point of this paper, an important corollary of public choice theory for the health field: that the past successes of the public sector are not likely to be repeated in the future. The reason is an increasing tension between the health needs of the rich versus the poor, with the greatest potential mortality gains coming from attention to the latter but political forces often dictating a flow of resources to the former. The third section provides numerous examples of this misallocation and suggests ways that selective use of fees and privatization may improve equity, efficiency, and returns to future public health spending."
Correspondence: N. Birdsall, World Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20433. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40657 Bobadilla, Jose L.; Possas, Cristina de A. Health policy issues in three Latin American countries: implications of the epidemiological transition. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 145-69 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This paper is concerned with health policy issues in Latin American countries, with emphasis on the changes that health systems need to introduce to meet the health needs resulting from the demographic and epidemiological transitions. To illustrate these policy issues, three country cases are analyzed here: Brazil, Colombia, and Mexico."
Correspondence: J. L. Bobadilla, World Bank, Population, Health and Nutrition Division, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20433. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40658 Caldwell, John C.; Caldwell, Pat. Roles of women, families, and communities in preventing illness and providing health services in developing countries. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 252-71 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"In this paper we examine aspects of society and of behavior that encourage or discourage health, concentrating on...South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and to a lesser extent, the Middle East....Much of this paper focuses on child deaths....The central argument of this paper is that the persons with the greatest interest in children's health and survival, and with the greatest willingness to devote time to their protection and to care for them in sickness, are children's mothers. Children may receive less than optimal attention both in health and in sickness because their mothers are prevented from giving them the needed attention, lack sufficient resources from the larger family or their husbands, or lack self-confidence about their ability to care and make health decisions. Many of these elements still exist and restrict the rate of health improvement not only for the children but for their mothers as well. Moreover, these restrictions on women probably also jeopardize their husbands' health and survival chances."
Correspondence: J. C. Caldwell, Australian National University, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, GPO 4, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40659 Doyle, Peter R.; Broomberg, Jonathan; Steinberg, Malcolm; Masobe, Patrick; Behr, Graeme. AIDS in South Africa: the demographic and economic implications. Centre for Health Policy Paper, No. 23, ISBN 1-874856-39-7. Sep 1991. 74 pp. University of the Witwatersrand, Medical School, Department of Community Health, Centre for Health Policy: Johannesburg, South Africa. In Eng.
This paper on the demographic impact of AIDS in South Africa is in two parts. The first part outlines a model developed by Peter Doyle to estimate the impact of AIDS on the population of South Africa. The second part examines the economic impact of the epidemic.
Correspondence: University of the Witwatersrand, Medical School, Department of Community Health, Centre for Health Policy, 7 York Road, Parktown, Johannesburg 2193, South Africa. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40660 Goldman, Noreen; Pebley, Anne R. Health cards, maternal reports, and the measurement of immunization coverage in Guatemala. OPR Working Paper, No. 92-7, Oct 1992. 40 pp. Princeton University, Office of Population Research [OPR]: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
"In this paper, we explore the implications of alternative methods of measuring immunization coverage rates in Guatemala, using data from the 1987 Encuesta Nacional de Salud Materno Infantil, and we consider the dangers of making inferences about levels and trends in coverage from cross-sectional data."
Correspondence: Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40661 Gomes, Melba. Economic and demographic research on malaria: a review of the evidence. Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 9, Nov 1993. 1,093-108 pp. Tarrytown, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"The paper presents an overview of the existing published demographic and economic research in relation to [malaria], and identifies questions which remain to be answered through further research. It begins with the domain of economics, evaluating the broad implications of the economic contributions to the literature on malaria and then examines what we know about levels and trends in malaria mortality." The geographical focus is worldwide, with emphasis on developing countries.
Correspondence: M. Gomes, World Health Organization, Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

59:40662 Gribble, James N.; Preston, Samuel H. The epidemiological transition: policy and planning implications for developing countries. ISBN 0-309-04830-7. LC 93-84592. 1993. xi, 271 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
This volume is the product of "a workshop to discuss the changing demographic and epidemiologic profiles of developing countries and responses from the health sector to these changes. The Workshop...was held November 20-22, 1991, at the National Academy of Sciences' Georgetown facility in Washington, D.C. This report includes ten of the papers presented during the workshop....First, participants considered the issue of projecting realistic scenarios of the populations and cause-of-death structures of developing countries, as well as discussed health over the life course. Second, the workshop turned to the mechanisms used to establish priorities in the allocation of health resources in response to the changing demographic and epidemiologic profiles. Particular attention was given to the appropriate use of data in establishing priorities. The third topic was the role of government, private medicine, and families in providing health services."
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Box 285, Washington, D.C. 20055. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40663 Gwatkin, Davidson R. Distributional implications of alternative strategic responses to the demographic-epidemiological transition--an initial inquiry. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 197-228 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The author examines ways in which a shift in health care priorities toward more stroke and heart attack prevention in developing countries could benefit higher socioeconomic classes at the expense of lower ones. He asks "is a shift in priorities from communicable diseases among infants and children toward chronic diseases at older ages to be welcomed or resisted? To the extent it is to be resisted, what alternative responses to the demographic and epidemiological transitions might be considered?...The information presented here suggests that the least healthy can be much better served by a strategy based on a careful study of their particular needs and that such a strategy is likely to give highest priority to communicable diseases among the young."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40664 Kaldor, John; McDonald, Ann M.; Blumer, Charles E.; Gertig, Dorota M.; Patten, John J.; Roberts, Martin; Walker, Carolyn C.; Mullins, Sue E.; Bailey, Kevin A.; Chuah, John C. P. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Australia: incidence 1982-1991. Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 158, No. 1, Jan 1993. 10-7 pp. Kingsgrove, Australia. In Eng.
The authors "describe the incidence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Australia between 1982 and 1991....[It is found that] 3,160 cases of AIDS were reported as having been diagnosed between 1982 and the end of 1991....Over 97% of cases were in men, of whom 91% were adults or adolescents reporting homosexual contact....The annual incidence of AIDS rose sharply until about 1988, but the annual rate of increase slowed in subsequent years."
Correspondence: J. Kaldor, University of New South Wales, National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research, 376 Victoria Street, Second Floor, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40665 Kourgueni, Idrissa A.; Garba, Bassirou; Barrere, Bernard. Demographic and Health Survey, Niger, 1992. [Enquete Demographique et de Sante, Niger, 1992.] Sep 1993. xxiv, 296 pp. Direction de la Statistique et des Comptes Nationaux: Niamey, Niger; Macro International, Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS]: Columbia, Maryland. In Fre.
Results are presented from the 1992 Niger Demographic and Health Survey. Following two chapters on survey methodology, there are chapters on family planning, marriage and exposure to risk of pregnancy, fertility preferences, mother and child health, lactation and nutrition, infant and child mortality, and maternal mortality. Two final chapters present results from a survey of husbands and describe the availability of health services.
Correspondence: Direction de la Statistique et des Comptes Nationaux, Rue de Sirba, B.P. 862, Niamey, Niger. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40666 Lande, Robert. Controlling sexually transmitted diseases. Population Reports, Series L: Issues in World Health, No. 9, Jun 1993. 31 pp. Johns Hopkins University, Center for Communication Programs, Population Information Program [PIP]: Baltimore, Maryland. In Eng.
The author describes modes of transmission, health impacts, and prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, and reviews governmental and private program efforts to control the spread of such diseases. Special attention is given to information, education, and communication programs and aspects of health care delivery. The geographical scope is worldwide.
Correspondence: Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, Population Information Program, 527 St. Paul Place, Baltimore, MD 21202. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40667 Manton, Kenneth G.; Stallard, Eric. Projecting morbidity and mortality in developing countries during adulthood. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 101-25 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This paper discusses a three-part model to forecast chronic disease, disability, and mortality [in developing countries]: the first part describes changes in risk factors; the second predicts disability, morbidity, or mortality as functions of risk factors; and the third assigns costs for health events that reduce productivity or incur medical costs."
Correspondence: K. G. Manton, Duke University, Center for Demographic Studies, 2117 Campus Drive, Durham, NC 27706. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40668 Miller, Jane E. Birth outcomes by mother's age at first birth in the Philippines. International Family Planning Perspectives, Vol. 19, No. 3, Sep 1993. 98-102 pp. New York, New York. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"Using a representative sample of births from a longitudinal study in the Philippines, in this article we investigate whether a mother's age at first birth affects birth outcomes. [We use] five different measures of infant health--birth weight, length of gestation, infant length (height), weight-for-gestational-age, and weight-for-length....The first step in our analysis will be to determine whether the high risks associated with being born to a young mother can be explained by the effects of birth order....Next, we conduct a multivariate analysis of birth outcomes among firstborn infants to ascertain whether infant health could be improved by the postponement of the first birth." Results indicate that "firstborn infants have significant disadvantages in [all five health measures] compared with infants at higher birth orders. There are also notable health disadvantages for infants born to mothers younger than 18."
Correspondence: J. E. Miller, Rutgers University, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research, New Brunswick, NJ 08901. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40669 Miller, Jane E.; Korenman, Sanders. Poverty, nutritional status, growth and cognitive development of children in the United States. OPR Working Paper, No. 93-5, Jun 1993. 28, [24] pp. Princeton University, Office of Population Research [OPR]: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth are used to describe deficits in nutritional status, physical growth, and cognitive development among poor children in the United States.
This is a revised version of a paper originally presented at the 1993 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America.
Correspondence: Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40670 Mosley, W. Henry; Gray, Ronald. Childhood precursors of adult morbidity and mortality in developing countries: implications for health programs. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 69-100 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This paper examines only one aspect of the health transition in developing countries. It looks at the emerging health problems among the adults and the aged, and assesses to what degree these chronic diseases and disabilities might be a consequence of infectious diseases and other adverse conditions that were experienced decades earlier in infancy and childhood."
Correspondence: W. H. Mosley, Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Population Dynamics, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40671 Mosley, W. Henry; Gray, Ronald H. Childhood precursors of adult morbidity and mortality in developing countries: implications for health programs. Johns Hopkins Population Center Papers on Population, No. 92-04, Jun [1992]. 33, [16] pp. Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health: Baltimore, Maryland. In Eng.
The authors "look at the emerging health problems among the adults and the aged [in developing countries] and assess to what degree these chronic diseases and disabilities might be a consequence of infectious diseases and other adverse conditions which were experienced decades earlier in infancy and childhood."
Correspondence: Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Population Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room 2300, Baltimore, MD 21205-2179. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40672 Pebley, Anne R.; Goldman, Noreen. Family, community, ethnic identity and the use of formal health care services in Guatemala. OPR Working Paper, No. 92-12, Nov 1992. 44 pp. Princeton University, Office of Population Research [OPR]: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
"In this paper, we investigate family choices about type of prenatal care and assistance at delivery (childbirth) and the use of childhood immunizations in Guatemala during the early and mid-1980s. Our objective is to investigate the reasons underlying relatively low use of formal health care services in Guatemala, particularly among the large indigenous population."
Correspondence: Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40673 Pebley, Anne R. Goals of the World Summit for Children and their implications for health policy in the 1990s. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 170-96 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The author examines goals set by the UN World Summit for Children held on September 29-30, 1990. "This paper is a brief assessment of the implications and consequences of pursuing and/or achieving the goals of the summit. In the first section of the paper, I consider whether the magnitude of the mortality reduction goals proposed seems feasible in light of past experience and whether achievement of these goals is likely to lead to substantial additional population growth. The second section of the paper is a discussion of the methods proposed in the summit document for implementing the goals, and the implications of governments and donors pursuing some goals but not others."
Correspondence: A. R. Pebley, RAND, P.O. Box 2138, Mail Stop 2F, 1700 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40674 Preston, Samuel H. Health indices as a guide to health sector planning: a demographic critique. In: The epidemiological transition: policy planning and implications for developing countries, edited by James N. Gribble and Samuel H. Preston. 1993. 126-44 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This paper examines, from a demographic perspective, the index of healthy years of life saved by health interventions. This index has been widely applied to summarize the expected gains from health programs in developing countries. The paper attempts to identify the demographic circumstances under which this index does and does not provide reliable information. It compares existing practices to the demographic accounting identities that describe how populations change over time. Problems that are revealed in using the index as a planning instrument include imprecision about the time sequence and age pattern of health program effects; inconsistency of assumptions; failure to incorporate interactions among disease processes; and failure to make explicit potentially valuable information. These problems are averted by the use of population projection to demonstrate the expected effects of health programs."
Correspondence: S. H. Preston, University of Pennsylvania, Population Studies Center, 3718 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40675 Reff, Daniel T. Disease, depopulation, and culture change in northwestern New Spain, 1518-1764. ISBN 0-87480-355-1. LC 90-52749. 1991. xiii, 330 pp. University of Utah Press: Salt Lake City, Utah. In Eng.
"I have sought to document the impact of Old World diseases in northwestern New Spain [or Mexico,] outlining a disease chronology for the region and exploring demographic issues as well as issues pertaining to the archaeological record, aboriginal culture, and the dynamics of Jesuit and Indian relations. Specifically, in chapter 2 I reconstruct aboriginal culture in various areas of the Greater Southwest [United States]....Chapter 3 provides a detailed disease chronology for northwestern Mexico....The demographic consequences of disease are examined in chapter 4....The nature and extent of [changes in native settlement, economic, sociopolitical, and religious systems] and the dynamics of Jesuit and Indian relations are examined in chapter 5."
Correspondence: University of Utah Press, 101 University Services Building, Salt Lake City, UT 84112. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:40676 Robertson, Ann. Beyond apocalyptic demography: critical reflections on the politics of need. Pub. Order No. DA9304844. 1992. 206 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This doctoral dissertation challenges the idea that population aging will create intolerable health-care burdens for developed countries, and was prepared at the University of California at Berkeley.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(10).

59:40677 Robine, Jean-Marie; Mathers, Colin D.; Bone, Margaret R.; Romieu, Isabelle. Calculation of health expectancies: harmonization, consensus achieved and future perspectives. [Calcul des esperances de vie en sante: harmonisation, acquis et perspectives.] Colloques INSERM, Vol. 226, ISBN 2-7420-0009-7. 1993. xxiii, 388 pp. John Libbey Eurotext: Montrouge, France; Les Editions INSERM: Paris, France. In Eng; Fre.
These are the proceedings of the sixth international workshop of the Reseau Esperance de Vie en Sante, or Network on Health Expectancy, held in Montpellier, France, in October 1992. The focus is on calculating expectancies of healthy life, in particular on how to achieve consensus on disability and health measures and their application in different countries. The 27 papers examine various topics, such as "health progress, models of disability, protocols, methods of calculation and inequality with respect to health, loss of health expectancy due to certain causes, developments, values, and usefulness of 'health expectancy'."
Correspondence: Editions John Libbey Eurotext, 6 rue Blanche, 92120 Montrouge, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

L.4. Demographic Factors and Human Genetics

Studies on consanguinity and isolates, inbreeding, and twinning.

59:40678 Roberts, D. F.; Fujiki, N.; Torizuka, K. Isolation, migration and health. Society for the Study of Human Biology Symposium Series, No. 33, ISBN 0-521-41912-3. LC 92-7845. 1992. xii, 267 pp. Cambridge University Press: New York, New York/Cambridge, England. In Eng.
These are the proceedings of a symposium of the Society for the Study of Human Biology held in Fukui, Japan, July 30-31, 1990. The focus of the 22 papers included is on the biological effects of the two processes of isolation and migration, in order "to show how the situations to which they give rise may be used to elucidate a variety of biological problems ranging from evolutionary change to disease etiology. This object is achieved by a number of examples, the majority of which have been studied by Asian investigators and are less widely known than the classic Western studies of say the Amish, Yanomama or the Aland islanders....Besides documenting the results, the chapters illustrate the different methods employed in such studies."
Correspondence: Cambridge University Press, Pitt Building, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1RP, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


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