Volume 59 - Number 2 - Summer 1993

G. Nuptiality and the Family

Studies that quantitatively analyze aspects of nuptiality and the family. Studies concerned equally with marriage and the family are coded first under G.2. Family and Household and cross-referenced to G.1. Marriage and Divorce . Methodological studies on nuptiality and the family are coded in this division and cross-referenced to N. Methods of Research and Analysis Including Models , as appropriate.

G.1. Marriage and Divorce

Studies of trends in marriage and divorce, nuptiality, duration of marriage, age at marriage, and demographic characteristics of marriage partners. Also includes studies of unmarried cohabitation and consensual unions.

59:20419 Casper, Lynne M. Community norms and cohabitation: effects of level and degree of consensus. OPR Working Paper, No. 92-9, Nov 1992. 21, [4] pp. Princeton University, Office of Population Research [OPR]: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
"The data used for this research were complied from two [U.S.] sources: (1) The National Survey of Families and Households; [and] (2) community identification data files created from zipcode information specifically for this research." Data concern 1988.
This is a revised version of a paper originally presented at the 1992 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America.
Correspondence: Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20420 De Santis, Gustavo. A standardized measure of the years spent in a given conjugal or marital state. Genus, Vol. 48, No. 1-2, Jan-Jun 1992. 19-46 pp. Rome, Italy. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Ita.
The author proposes a model that synthesizes "the most important effects of the processes of couple formation and dissolution on the stock (number and main demographic characteristics) of...couples....[The model] is presented, discussed and applied to both formal and informal unions [in] different [developed] countries at different points in time."
Correspondence: G. De Santis, Universita degli Studi, Istituto di Statistica, Messina, Italy. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20421 Diekmann, Andreas. Sex-ratio, divorce, and labor force participation--an analysis of international aggregate data. In: Economic evolution and demographic change: formal models in social sciences, edited by G. Haag, U. Mueller, and K. G. Troitzsch. 1992. 283-93 pp. Springer-Verlag: New York, New York/Berlin, Germany. In Eng.
The author examines the effect of the sex ratio on the likelihood of divorce using published data for the period 1980-1988 for 69 countries. "In contrast to [a] study of Trent and South (1989) our analysis of aggregate international data does not confirm the supposed negative effect of the sex ratio on the divorce rate....Further, the study does not show that sex ratios are unimportant in explaining certain demographic and economic characteristics. We [also] found a significant negative effect of the sex ratio on women's labor force participation...."
For the article by Katherine Trent and Scott J. South, published in 1989, see 55:30424.
Correspondence: A. Diekmann, University of Bern, Institute of Sociology, Hochschulstrasse 4, 3012 Bern, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

59:20422 Domingo, Lita J.; King, Elizabeth M. The role of the family in the process of entry to marriage in Asia. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 87-108 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"In this chapter we seek explanations for recent changes in nuptial patterns in Asia, utilizing a theoretical framework that draws its major elements from recent expositions using the family as the pivotal institution as well as from those that focus on aggregate shifts brought about by economic development and demographic changes that bear on the availability of marriage partners. From this discussion a set of propositions will be drawn and empirically tested with data from the Asian Marriage Survey....This chapter demonstrates that the observed nuptiality transition in Asia reflects dynamic changes within the family as it responds to changing opportunities and constraints in the economy."
Correspondence: L. J. Domingo, University of the Philippines, Population Institute, Quezon City, Philippines. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20423 Ekamper, Peter; Keilman, Nico. Sensitivity analysis in a multidimensional demographic projection model with a two-sex algorithm. Mathematical Population Studies, Vol. 4, No. 1, 1993. 21-36 pp. Reading, England. In Eng.
"Formulas are derived for the effect that a slight change in the occurrence/exposure rate of the multidimensional projection model has on the elements of the population vector. The projection model classifies the population by sex, age, and marital status. The model includes a two-sex algorithm in order to ensure consistency between numbers of male and female marriages, number of divorces for the two sexes, and new widows (widowers) and deceased spouses. The sensitivity functions and elasticities are applied to data from the Netherlands for the period 1980-1984. The results indicate that marriage market mechanisms, in particular competition and substitution effects, are reasonably well modelled."
Correspondence: P. Ekamper, Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute, P.O. Box 11650, 2502 AR The Hague, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20424 Fricke, Tom. Political economy and fertility: history, culture, and demographic events in a central Himalayan village. Population Studies Center Research Report, No. 92-267, Dec 1992. 38, [v] pp. University of Michigan, Population Studies Center: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This study "examines the demographic consequences of culturally motivated political strategies implied by relationships created and maintained by marriage within a natural fertility society." The focus is on the central Himalayan village of Timling, Nepal.
Correspondence: University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20425 Gage-Brandon, Anastasia J.; Meekers, Dominique. The changing dynamics of family formation: women's status and nuptiality in Togo. Population Research Institute Working Paper, No. 1993-02, Jan 1993. 35 pp. Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute: University Park, Pennsylvania. In Eng.
"Using data from the [1988] Togolese Demographic and Health Survey, this paper examines the relationship between women's status and nuptiality patterns."
Correspondence: Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute, 22 Burrowes Building, University Park, PA 16802-6202. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20426 Hancioglu, Attila; Akadli Ergocmen, Banu. Some social aspects of Turkish marital unions and their relationship with early age mortality. Nufusbilim Dergisi/Turkish Journal of Population Studies, Vol. 14, 1992. 3-25 pp. Ankara, Turkey. In Eng. with sum. in Tur.
"In this study, data from the 1988 Turkish Population and Health Survey are used to describe some social aspects of Turkish marital unions. The social attributes in [the] questionnaire [include] the legal standing of the union, consanguinity, decision making in the formation of the union and payment of bridesmoney." In the second part of the study, the authors look at the relationship between aspects of marriage in Turkey and mortality among children of those marriages.
Correspondence: A. Hancioglu, Hacettepe University, Institute of Population Studies, Hacettepe Parki, Ankara, Turkey. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20427 Huang, Liangcao. An analysis of the causes for the variations in the number of first marriages in the past 44 years (1944-1987) in China. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1992. 119-26 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
Determinants of changes in first marriage trends in China during the period 1944-1987 are analyzed. The author finds that "in the past 40 or so years, the number of first marriages has been on the steady rise and the age of population at first marriage and childbirth has been getting younger. This is particularly true for the 70s and 80s...." Data are from the 1988 Two per Thousand Sampling Survey of Fertility and Birth Control.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20428 Jelin, Elizabeth. Celibacy, solitude, and personal autonomy: individual choice and social constraints. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 109-24 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author examines celibacy in the context of changing social norms. "This chapter attempts to approach the issue of celibacy in a different way, looking at the changing place of marriage and of celibacy in social and cultural structures. Furthermore, it attempts to place the issue in a wider context of understanding personal autonomy and solitude in various socio-cultural settings." The geographical scope is worldwide, with a special focus on Latin America.
Correspondence: E. Jelin, Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad, Pueyrredon 510, Piso 7, 1032 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20429 Kaufmann, Georgia L.; Meekers, Dominique. A reappraisal of the status of women and nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Population Research Institute Working Paper, No. 1992-23, Nov 1992. 20 pp. Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute: University Park, Pennsylvania. In Eng.
"The data used in this paper are taken from NUPFILE 2, a databank on nuptiality in sub-Saharan Africa that contains information on 170 ethnic groups, representing 69 ethnic clusters...."
For a description of the databank used here, described in a 1989 paper by Ron Lesthaeghe, Kaufmann, and Meekers, see 56:10367.
Correspondence: Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute, 22 Burrowes Building, University Park, PA 16802-6202. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20430 Koc, Ismet. Marriage rates and their life table analysis in Turkey. [Turkiye'de evlenme hizlari ve evlenme hizlarinin yasam tablosu yontemi ile analizi.] Nufusbilim Dergisi/Turkish Journal of Population Studies, Vol. 14, 1992. 27-51 pp. Ankara, Turkey. In Tur. with sum. in Eng.
The author examines Turkey's marriage rate, using life table data for the period 1975-1990. Consideration is given to gender and age differentials, remarriage, and length of time spent in an unmarried state.
Correspondence: I. Koc, Hacettepe Universitesi, Nufus Etutleri Enstitusu, Arastirma Gorevlisi, Hacettepe Parki, Ankara, Turkey. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20431 Kuciarska-Ciesielska, Marlena. Causes of divorce. [Przyczyny rozwodow.] Wiadomosci Statystyczne, Vol. 37, No. 1, 1993. 13-9 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Pol. with sum. in Eng.
Results are presented from a 1991 survey on causes of divorce in Poland. "From the women's point of view, alcohol abuse by husband, infidelity, a lack of interest in family life and lack of responsibility were the most frequent causes of the divorces. For men, the most important causes were...a lack of understanding between spouses, infidelity and the influence of other people (mainly parents)."
Correspondence: M. Kuciarska-Ciesielska, Glowny Urzad Statystyczny, Departament Badan Spolecznych i Demograficznych, Al. Niepodleglosci 208, 00 925 Warsaw, Poland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20432 Lazo, Aida C. G. V. Marriage duration in Brazil: a proportional hazards analysis of separation and divorce for the state of Sao Paulo. OPR Working Paper, No. 92-5, Sep 1992. 21 pp. Princeton University, Office of Population Research [OPR]: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
Data are from the 1984 Brazilian National Household Survey (PNAD).
Correspondence: Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20433 Li, Jiang Hong. The black and white differences in first marriage propensity: individual and contextual influences. Pub. Order No. DA9301076. 1992. 277 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This study concerns the United States and was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(8).

59:20434 Manting, D. Which women experience divorce? [Welke vrouwen maken een echtscheiding mee?] Maandstatistiek van de Bevolking, Vol. 41, No. 2, Feb 1993. 18-29 pp. Voorburg, Netherlands. In Dut. with sum. in Eng.
"This study reports on the determinants of divorce of married Dutch women, born between 1950 and 1969....The impact of several factors on the divorce process is examined....The analyses show that the women who have the highest divorce rates grew up in a big city, cohabited before marriage (and are or were religious), married before age 21 in the period 1980-88 and had a child before, or within six months after, the wedding. On the basis of these results, it is estimated that 20% will experience divorce within the first five years of their marriage. The data for the analyses have been derived from The Netherlands Fertility Survey (1988)...."
Correspondence: D. Manting, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Planologisch en Demografisch Instituut, Jodenbreestraat 23, 1011 NH Amsterdam, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20435 Pescador, Juan J. Urban preindustrial nuptiality and the limits on intermarriage: characteristics and evolution of marriage practices in Mexico City, 1700-1850. [La nupcialidad urbana preindustrial y los limites del mestizaje: caracteristicas y evolucion de los patrones de nupcialidad en la Ciudad de Mexico, 1700-1850.] Estudios Demograficos y Urbanos, Vol. 7, No. 1, Jan-Apr 1992. 137-68 pp. Mexico City, Mexico. In Spa.
The author examines marriage patterns in Mexico City, Mexico, during the eighteenth century. The strongly female-oriented sex ratio and strict social and ethnic marriage customs, including racial endogamy, are cited as causes for the preponderance of unions between young women and older men. Sections are included on marriages among and within ethnic groups, second marriages, and the stiffening of restrictions on intermarriage over the period.
Correspondence: J. J. Pescador, Colegio de Mexico, Centro de Estudios Demograficos y de Desarrollo Urbano, Camino al Ajusco 20, 10740 Mexico, DF, Mexico. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20436 Saluter, Arlene F. Marital status and living arrangements: March 1992. Current Population Reports, Series P-20: Population Characteristics, No. 468, Dec 1992. xvi, 62, [22] pp. U.S. Bureau of the Census: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This report presents detailed information on the marital status and living arrangements of the noninstitutional population of the United States, based on the results of the March 1992 Current Population Survey. The text of this report compares current survey data with data collected from earlier surveys....The estimates for 1992 in this report are inflated to national population controls by age, race, sex, and Hispanic origin. The population controls are based on results of the 1980 census carried forward to 1992." Statistics are included on marital and family status, the presence and marital status of parents, living arrangements of children under age 18, and households with two unrelated adults.
Correspondence: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. 20402. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20437 Tien, H. Yuan. Potential causes for the revival of early marriage. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1992. 149-59 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
Causes for recent fluctuations toward an earlier marriage age in China are analyzed. Consideration is given to changes in marriage law, the social roles of men and women in deciding when to marry, and the long-term effects of these changes. Data are for both rural and urban regions.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20438 Tolts, Mark. Jewish marriages in the USSR: a demographic analysis. East European Jewish Affairs, Vol. 22, No. 2, Winter 1992. 3-19 pp. London, England. In Eng.
Marriage trends among Jews in the former Soviet Union are examined for the period 1979-1989. Consideration is given to intermarriage, the percentage of the population that is currently married by sex, and marriage age. Data are presented for the whole country and for selected republics.
Correspondence: M. Tolts, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Institute of Contemporary Jewry, Division of Jewish Demography and Statistics, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91905, Israel. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20439 Wadhera, Surinder; Strachan, Jill. Demographic trends of marriages in Canada: 1921-1990. [Les mariages au Canada: analyse des tendances demographiques 1921-1990.] Health Reports/Rapports sur la Sante, Vol. 4, No. 4, Mar 1992. 403-21 pp. Ottawa, Canada. In Eng; Fre.
"This paper mainly describes levels and trends of marriages and rates and its relationship with demographic and social conditions in Canada from 1921 to 1990. In Canada, the propensity to marry was much higher in the 1960s and early 1970s than in the 1980s....Since 1921 the average age at marriage has increased by 3.6 years for brides and 1.7 years for grooms. The proportion of marriages by previously divorced persons increased sharply after 1968. The changes in marriage rates in Canada parallel those exhibited in the United States and other developed countries in the western hemisphere."
Correspondence: S. Wadhera, Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Health Information, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20440 Wang, Deming. The timing of marriage and fertility in rural and urban China. Pub. Order No. DA9236982. 1992. 352 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This study was developed as a doctoral dissertation at the University of Minnesota.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(7).

59:20441 Zeng, Yi; Wang, Deming. An event history analysis of remarriages of females in China. Institute of Population Research Working Paper, No. 9, Dec 1992. 14 pp. Peking University, Institute of Population Research: Beijing, China. In Eng.
"The data used for this study are derived from the [1985-1987] large sample surveys called the In-Depth-Fertility-Surveys organized by the State Statistical Bureau of China...."
Correspondence: Peking University, Institute of Population Research, Beijing 100871, China. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

G.2. Family and Household

Studies of household structure and of family composition and size and the factors influencing them. Includes the full range of family concepts from the one-parent to the extended family and includes studies on the life course of the family. Studies on attitudes toward family size are coded under F.4.4. Attitudes toward Fertility and Fertility Control .

59:20442 Berquo, Elza; Xenos, Peter. Family systems and cultural change. International Studies in Demography, ISBN 0-19-828384-9. LC 92-12428. 1992. xiii, 222 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
This is a selection of papers that were presented at a seminar on changes in family structure and the life course in developing countries. The conference was held in Honolulu, Hawaii, in January 1987. The papers are organized under separate sections covering regional and global comparisons; processes and institutions, including traditional family systems, the effects of slavery on family structure, and the role of the family in entry to marriage; and directions for the future of family research. A list of contributing authors and their affiliations is included.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20443 Bertram, Hans. The family in West Germany: stability and change in family life forms. [Die Familie in Westdeutschland: Stabilitat und Wandel familialer Lebensformen.] Deutsches Jugend-Institut Familien-Survey, No. 1, ISBN 3-8100-0926-1. 1991. 568 pp. Leske und Budrich: Opladen, Germany. In Ger.
Data from surveys carried out every four to five years by the Deutsches Jugend-Institut are used to analyze changes in the family in West Germany. Sections are included on social relationships; partnership, including changes in marriage over the past five decades and sex-specific differences in labor force participation; social status; and children, including desired and actual number of children, as well as attitudes toward children and family.
Correspondence: Leske und Budrich, Gerhart-Hauptmann-Strasse 27, Postfach 300406, W-5090 Leverkusen 3, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20444 Bonvalet, Catherine; Maison, Dominique; Le Bras, Herve; Charles, Lionel. Friends and relatives. [Proches et parents.] Population, Vol. 48, No. 1, Jan-Feb 1993. 83-110 pp. Paris, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
The roles of family and social networks as socioeconomic support systems throughout an individual's life cycle are discussed. Data are for France.
Correspondence: C. Bonvalet, Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20445 Caldwell, John C.; Caldwell, Pat. Family systems: their viability and vulnerability. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 46-66 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This chapter focuses on the forces that stabilize family systems, and on the transactional and demographic characteristics of such systems. It identifies their potential for destabilization when sufficient socio-economic change occurs. While it accepts the view that individuals have a major concern with the reproduction of their families and society, it also assumes that they are interested in attaining and maintaining positions of relative advantage in intrafamilial relations. Thus, we treat the family not as an emotional unit but as an institution with the potential for internal conflict, particularly as is evidenced by social mechanisms for constraining and minimizing such conflict." The geographical scope is worldwide.
Correspondence: J. C. Caldwell, Australian National University, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20446 Clarke, Lynda. Children's family circumstances: recent trends in Great Britain. European Journal of Population/Revue Europeenne de Demographie, Vol. 8, No. 4, 1992. 309-40 pp. Amsterdam, Netherlands. In Eng. with sum. in Fre.
"In the last two decades there have been marked changes in the structure and dynamics of families in Britain. The primary aim of this paper is to present some data on recent changes in family life from the perspective of children. Our main concern will be the family circumstances, or living arrangements, of children and their experience of living in a lone-parent family....Such information has important policy implications for issues concerning child care and support, from the need for financial provision generally to the legal decisions concerning the custodianship of children after divorce."
Correspondence: L. Clarke, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Center for Population Studies, 99 Gower Street, London WC1E 6AZ, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20447 de Oliveira, Maria C. F. A. Family change and family process: implications for research in developing countries. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 201-14 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The concept of family change in developing countries is examined. The author then evaluates various methods of research with a focus on data requirements.
Correspondence: M. C. F. A. de Oliveira, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Nucleo de Estudos de Populacao, Caixa Postal 6166, CEP 13081 Campinas, SP, Brazil. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20448 De Vos, Susan. Is there a socioeconomic dimension to household extension in Latin America? Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Vol. 24, No. 1, Spring 1993. 21-34 pp. Calgary, Canada. In Eng.
"The aim of this paper is to investigate whether and how urban/rural residence or, in urban areas, husband's occupation, is related to household extension in six Latin American countries (Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama and Peru)....This paper addresses the strategy of adding an extended family member to the household which could mean pooling earnings and/or enlarging the household's work force....This paper provides an overview, asking: 1) Are lower status residents of urban areas more likely to live in extended households than their rural counterparts, and 2) Is there a generally negative relationship between socio-economic status and extension among urban households?"
Correspondence: S. De Vos, University of Wisconsin, Center for Demography and Ecology, 4412 Social Science Building, 1180 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706-1393. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

59:20449 Desai, Jaikishan R. The demand for children in farm households in the Philippines. Pub. Order No. DA9234954. 1992. 188 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This study was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(7).

59:20450 Desai, Sonalde. Children at risk: the role of family structure in Latin America and west Africa. Population and Development Review, Vol. 18, No. 4, Dec 1992. 698-717, 787, 789-90 pp. New York, New York. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"Models of the family proposed by the 'new household economics' have had a strong influence on researchers and policymakers alike. In extending these models to developing countries, however, relatively little attention has been directed to the applicability of some of their underlying assumptions in diverse cultural settings. Two aspects of these models seem particularly problematic: the assumption of a cohesive family unit with perfect altruism within the family, and lack of consideration of flexible boundaries of the household observed in many cultures. Using data on the nutritional status of children in northeast Brazil, Colombia, and the Dominican Republic in Latin America, and in Ghana, Mali, and Senegal in West Africa, this article examines the importance of these two issues in predicting the level of resources available to children."
Correspondence: S. Desai, Population Council, Research Division, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20451 Ekouevi, Koffi A. Family and reproductive behavior in urban Togo. Pub. Order No. DA9235134. 1992. 221 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This study was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at the University of Pennsylvania.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(7).

59:20452 Ellwood, David T. The changing structure of American families: the bigger family planning issue. Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 59, No. 1, Winter 1993. 3-8 pp. Chicago, Illinois. In Eng.
The author looks at recent changes in families in the United States and the implications of those changes for social policy.
Correspondence: D. T. Ellwood, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Cambridge, MA 02138. Location: Princeton University Library (SF).

59:20453 Foote, Karen A.; Martin, Linda G. Family and development: summary of an expert meeting. LC 93-83778. 1993. ix, 53 pp. National Academy Press: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
This volume provides a summary of the briefing papers presented at a meeting held July 16-17, 1992 organized by the Committee on Population of the National Research Council, as well as of the discussions that followed the presentations. The focus of the meeting was on the family as a factor in the process of socioeconomic development. The three main topics considered are family allocations within and across households, the geographic and social contexts of families, and policies, programs, and families. A full list of the papers presented and their authors is included. The primary geographical focus is on developing countries.
Correspondence: National Research Council, Committee on Population, 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20418. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20454 Foster, Andrew D. Household partition in rural Bangladesh. Population Studies, Vol. 47, No. 1, Mar 1993. 97-114 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"In this paper the author uses longitudinal data collected in rural Bangladesh to [examine] the process of household partition. There are three main parts to the paper. The first consists of a descriptive analysis of household structure which indicates that partition is an important determinant of household structure in this population, particularly for young couples in the early stages of family formation. Secondly, a procedure is developed for the analysis of household partition, which makes use of data on relationship to head of household....Thirdly, data on the educational attainment of children are used to provide an indirect measure of the extent to which recently partitioned households continued to operate as a single economic and social unit. Although partitioned households remained in close proximity, they exhibited significant independence with regard to decisions about the educational attainment of children, something that is not apparent in jointly-resident sub-households."
Correspondence: A. D. Foster, University of Pennsylvania, Economics Department, 3718 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6398. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20455 Garcia Gonzalez, Francisco. The structure of private life and the family: the house and family size in Zacatecas. Early decades of the nineteenth century. [Los muros de la vida privada y la familia: casa y tamano familiar en Zacatecas. Primeras decadas del siglo XIX.] Estudios Demograficos y Urbanos, Vol. 7, No. 1, Jan-Apr 1992. 35-52 pp. Mexico City, Mexico. In Spa.
The author reviews family characteristics in Zacatecas, Mexico, during the early decades of the nineteenth century using data from a census conducted in 1827.
Correspondence: F. Garcia Gonzalez, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Centro de Investigaciones Historicas, Jardin Juarez 147, 98000 Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Mexico. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20456 Golini, Antonio; Sgritta, Giovanni B.; Silvestrini, Angela. The demographic transition, childhood, and the quality of life in urban areas. [Trasformazioni demografiche, infanzia e qualita della vita in ambiente urbano.] Istituto di Ricerche sulla Popolazione Working Paper, No. 02/92, 1992. 55 pp. Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerche sulla Popolazione [IRP]: Rome, Italy. In Ita. with sum. in Eng; Fre.
The focus is on the effects of the fertility decline on children in Italy.
Correspondence: Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Ricerche sulla Popolazione, Viale Beethoven 56, 00144 Rome, Italy. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20457 He, Yan. Micro and macro factors affecting childbearing aspirations. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1992. 161-4 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
Determinants of desired family size in China are briefly discussed. The author finds "that factors that affect people's childbearing aspirations and consequently their reproductive behavior include not only those micro factors that have a direct impact on the interest of individuals and families, but also macro factors that affect the population as a whole...."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20458 Hernandez, Donald J. Studies in household and family formation: when households continue, discontinue, and form. Current Population Reports, Series P-23: Special Studies, No. 179, Sep 1992. 44 pp. U.S. Bureau of the Census: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
In this report, the author uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to analyze trends in the formation, continuation, or breakdown of families and households in the United States. Various social and economic factors that affect these changes are examined, including age, educational status, employment, and poverty.
Correspondence: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. 20402. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20459 Himes, Christine L. Social demography of contemporary families and aging. Generations, Vol. 17, No. 3, Summer 1992. 13-6 pp. San Francisco, California. In Eng.
This study examines how recent demographic trends in the United States concerning fertility, mortality, and marriage have affected the family structure of older Americans. Data are from official sources, including the Current Population Survey for 1990.
Correspondence: C. L. Himes, Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute, University Park, PA 16802. Location: New York Public Library, New York, NY.

59:20460 Hohn, Charlotte. The IUSSP programme in family demography. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 3-8 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author reviews the activities of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP) in the discipline of family demography over the past decade.
Correspondence: C. Hohn, Bundesinstitut fur Bevolkerungsforschung, Gustav-Stresemann-Ring 6, D-6200 Wiesbaden, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20461 Kuang, Zhenquan; Zhuang, Yan. A study on the stage of contraction in Chinese family life cycle. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1992. 127-37 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"In the first part of the paper, we will define various stages in the family life cycle. In the second part, we will offer a preliminary description of the family life cycle for two generations of women in both urban and rural areas in China, using the data of the 1988 survey of the family life cycle in six provinces and two cities. In the third part, we will focus on the univariate analysis of the stage of contraction. In the fourth part, we will conduct a multivariate analysis of the causes and timing of the contractive stage."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20462 Li, Jiang Hong; Wojtkiewicz, Roger A. A new look at the effects of family structure on status attainment. Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 73, No. 3, Sep 1992. 581-95 pp. Austin, Texas. In Eng.
"This study investigates the effects of family structure on [socioeconomic] status attainment using data from the [U.S.] National Survey of Families and Households. The findings show that living in a mother-only or mother/stepfather family lowers a child's socioeconomic attainment. Changing from a two-biological-parent family to a mother-only family lowers attainment as does change from a mother-only to a mother/stepfather family."
Correspondence: J. H. Li, University of Washington, Department of Sociology, Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology, DK-40, Seattle, WA 98195. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

59:20463 Lindsay, Colin. Lone-parent families in Canada: target groups project. Pub. Order No. 89-522E. ISBN 0-660-14195-7. Dec 1992. 47 pp. Statistics Canada, Housing, Family and Social Statistics Division: Ottawa, Canada. In Eng.
The characteristics of one-parent families in Canada are described using official data from various sources. Sections are included on family and population characteristics, lone parents in the workplace, income, and housing and household amenities. The report is also available in French.
Correspondence: Statistics Canada, Housing, Family and Social Statistics Division, 7th Floor, Jean Talon Building, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0T6, Canada. Location: New York Public Library, New York, NY.

59:20464 Lloyd, Cynthia B.; Gage-Brandon, Anastasia J. Women's role in maintaining households: family welfare and sexual inequality in Ghana. Population Studies, Vol. 47, No. 1, Mar 1993. 115-31 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"Over the last 30 years in Ghana, the proportion of households headed by women has increased and the composition of these households has shifted, with a growing percentage of households headed by the divorced and widowed. The paper assesses the implications of these trends for family welfare, and evaluates more broadly the current role of women in the economic maintenance of households with children, using data from the Ghana Living Standards Survey....In all types of household, women work, on average, longer hours than men, but the differences between the sexes are greatest when men and women co-reside, and least when they do not. Access to resources from an economically committed male is found to be important to the welfare of female-headed households...."
Correspondence: C. B. Lloyd, Population Council, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20465 Marsh, Catherine; Arber, Sara. Families and households: divisions and change. ISBN 0-312-06872-7. LC 91-22449. 1992. xi, 217 pp. St. Martin's Press: New York, New York. In Eng.
This is a review of recent research on changes in family structure and living arrangements in the United Kingdom. Most of the 10 papers were originally presented at the 1990 British Sociological Association Annual Conference. Two of the papers are concerned with West Germany.
Correspondence: St. Martin's Press, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. Location: Rutgers University Library, New Brunswick, NJ.

59:20466 McDonald, Peter. Convergence or compromise in historical family change? In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 15-30 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author critically examines the convergence theory of family structure. Consideration is given to the development cycle in domestic groups, initial family systems, and social change and family reconstitution. Arguments for and against the theory are reviewed.
Correspondence: P. McDonald, Australian Institute of Family Studies, 300 Queen Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20467 Mutchler, Jan E. Living arrangements and household transitions among the unmarried in later life. Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 73, No. 3, Sep 1992. 565-80 pp. Austin, Texas. In Eng.
"This analysis examines living arrangements and transitions within the household population of nonmarried [U.S.] individuals aged 55 and over. A household choice model of living arrangements is tested at the cross-sectional and longitudinal levels of analysis in order to contrast the correlates of living arrangements in later life to the predictors of change in living arrangements. While each type of resource is related to living alone at a given point in time, only economic resources are important in the transition to living alone, while only kinship resources are significant in the transition to not living alone."
Correspondence: J. E. Mutchler, State University of New York, Department of Sociology, Buffalo, NY 14260. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

59:20468 Najera, C.; Aparisi, M. L.; Gomez, F. Sex ratio and factors influencing family size in a human population from Spain. Behavior Genetics, Vol. 22, No. 5, 1992. 531-43 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
The authors examine changes in the secondary sex ratio and family size over time using data on 608 students in Valencia, Spain. "The average number of children was 3.59, 3.05, and 2.10 and the secondary sex ratio was 113.3, 101.2, and 98.6 for the parental, present, and projected generation respectively." Attention is also given to changes in sex preference over time.
Correspondence: C. Najera, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Departamento de Genetica, Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjasot, Valencia, Spain. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20469 Norton, Arthur J.; Miller, Louisa F. Marriage, divorce, and remarriage in the 1990's. Current Population Reports, Series P-23: Special Studies, No. 180, Oct 1992. 21 pp. U.S. Bureau of the Census: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This report...supplies information on the well-being of families, by presenting and interpreting data from several retrospective surveys of marriage and fertility history of adults in the United States. These surveys provide the basis for a fuller understanding of variables that influence people to marry, divorce, remarry, and redivorce--actions which directly affect the living situations of individuals and families. The authors use recent trends to describe how present circumstances have evolved and to develop...scenarios for the near-term future regarding marriage and family trends."
Correspondence: U.S. Government Printing Office, Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D.C. 20402. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20470 Oppong, Christine. Traditional family systems in rural settings in Africa. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 69-86 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"In this chapter I first define the traditional state of society and then examine aspects of African systems of domestic organization, kinship, and marriage. This is undertaken with a view to shedding light on the typical characteristics of traditional African family systems. These are systems that ensure the availability of the resources required for material existence in natural environments that are often harsh and demanding; the reproduction and survival of the human population in conditions of vulnerability to disease and consequent low life expectancy, and the transmission from one generation to the next of both material and cultural heritages, thus maintaining the viability and continuity of effective socio-economic groups from decade to decade, based upon descent and affinity."
Correspondence: C. Oppong, International Labour Office, Planning and Population Branch, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20471 Radecki, Stephen E. A racial and ethnic comparison of family formation and contraceptive practices among low-income women. Public Health Reports, Vol. 106, No. 5, Sep-Oct 1991. 494-502 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"Data were analyzed from a survey of 918 low-income women in Los Angeles County....[The] results document distinctive patterns of family formation for low-income women in racial and ethnic subgroups of this population. Implications of these patterns of family formation for economic well-being are discussed."
Correspondence: S. E. Radecki, Memorial Family Medicine, 2701 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90806. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20472 Ryder, Norman B. The centrality of time in the study of the family. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 161-75 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author assesses the significance of the passage of time for an individual's or a population's life course. He concludes that "the family is above all the institution to which is assigned the responsibility for attempting to solve the problems of the passage of time both for the individual and for the population."
Correspondence: N. B. Ryder, Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20473 Steckel, Richard H. The slavery period and its influence on family change in the United States. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 144-58 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author analyzes the effect of slavery on family formation by slaves in the United States from the early 1800s to 1860. Consideration is given to changes in slavery law, mate selection, marriage between slaves from different plantations, forced migration, and the effect of work routines on parent-child relationships.
Correspondence: R. H. Steckel, Ohio State University, Department of Economics, 190 North Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20474 Stolcke, Verena. The slavery period and its influence on household structure and the family in Jamaica, Cuba, and Brazil. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 124-43 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"In this chapter I undertake to compare recent findings on slave families and their descendants in Jamaica, Cuba, and Brazil....My aim is to identify some of the ways in which slaves and free Blacks shaped their mating patterns, values, and family forms under the socio-structural constraints of societies structured in a very fundamental way by race."
Correspondence: V. Stolcke, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament d'Historia de les Societats Pre-capitalistes, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20475 Tansel, Aysit. Estimating cost of children. Middle East Technical University Studies in Development, Vol. 17, No. 3-4, 1990. 113-38 pp. Ankara, Turkey. In Eng. with sum. in Tur.
"This study provides empirical evidence on the monetary cost of children in an urban setting in Turkey. For this purpose, Rothbarth's adult good method of estimating cost of children is used. Adult good Engel curves of five different functional forms are estimated using tobacco-alcohol, adult clothing and total adult expenditures. Households of couples and couples with children are compared. The results indicate that at the average total expenditure level one child cost approximately 23 percent of an adult couple, and that child costs increase as income rises."
Correspondence: A. Tansel, Middle East Technical University, Department of Economics, 06531 Ankara, Turkey. Location: University of Pennsylvania Library, Philadelphia, PA.

59:20476 Touliatos, John. Inventory of marriage and family literature, 1991/92. Vol. 18, ISBN 0-916174-32-8. LC 67-63014. 1993. xiv, 946 pp. DataTRAQ International: Anoka, Minnesota; National Council on Family Relations: Minneapolis, Minnesota. In Eng.
This inventory is one in a series that lists published studies on marriage and fertility. This volume includes citations to the literature published in English between December 1991 and December 1992. The citations do not include abstracts, but these are available through IMFL (Inventory of Marriage and Family Literature) Online. The inventory is divided into three parts: a subject index, an author index, and a Key Word in Title (KWIT) index. The geographical scope is worldwide.
For Volume 17, published in 1991, see 58:20446.
Correspondence: DataTRAQ International, P.O. Box 488, Anoka, MN 55303-0488. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20477 Vimard, Patrice. Family modernity and plurality in west Africa. [Modernite et pluralite familiales en Afrique de l'Ouest.] Revue Tiers Monde, Vol. 34, No. 133, Jan-Mar 1993. 89-115 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
Recent changes in family characteristics in west Africa are analyzed using data for the Ivory Coast and Togo. The focus of the study is on the exposure of rural communities to the market economy and how this has led to the emergence of new social trends that have affected family characteristics. The author notes that this process of social change has resulted in a wide range of family types of varying stability.
Correspondence: P. Vimard, Institut Francais de Recherche Scientifique pour le Developpement en Cooperation, 213 rue Lafayette, 75480 Paris Cedex 10, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20478 Wang, Jianguo. A microsimulation model for regional household analysis. Pub. Order No. DA9301918. 1992. 199 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This study was developed as a doctoral dissertation at the State University of New York at Buffalo.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(9).

59:20479 Wilson, Chris; Dyson, Tim. Family systems and cultural change: perspectives from past and present. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 31-45 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"Our purposes in this chapter are...to examine family structures in India and Europe and in doing so to consider the utility of various theoretical approaches to this subject." The focus is on historical perspectives.
Correspondence: C. Wilson, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Population Studies, Houghton Street, Aldwych, London WC2A 2AE, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20480 Young, Mei Ling. Analysing household histories. In: Family systems and cultural change, edited by Elza Berquo and Peter Xenos. 1992. 176-200 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author first reviews various methods of analyzing household history data. "This is followed by presentation of a technique for analysing household histories using the life-course construct developed from the Malay Household Study, and by an examination of suggested examples of life-course analysis. The chapter concludes with a statement on the state of techniques for analysing household histories, particularly the difficult issues of macro- and micro-linkages, and its future in life-course analysis in less developed countries."
Correspondence: M. L. Young, Malaysian Institute of Economic Research, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:20481 Zang, Xiaowei. Household structure and marriage in urban China: 1900-1982. Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Vol. 24, No. 1, Spring 1993. 35-44 pp. Calgary, Canada. In Eng.
"The present paper...[examines] some of the changes in [the] family institution [in China] since 1900, with particular attention to: (1) age at first marriage; (2) freedom of mate choice; (3) postmarital residence; [and] (4) family structure....The data are from a survey conducted in 1982-1983 in the urban areas of China's five big cities--Chengdu, Shanghai, Nanjing, Tianjing, and Beijing."
Correspondence: X. Zang, University of California, Department of Sociology, Berkeley, CA 94720. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).


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