Volume 59 - Number 1 - Spring 1993

O. The Production of Population Statistics

Studies concerned with the actual production of basic population data. Includes more than governmental publications.

O.1. Population Statistics, General Aspects

Studies on the collection of general demographic statistics and related problems such as studies on data processing.

59:10764 Guilmoto, Christophe Z. Counts and accounts: demographic institutions in colonial south India. [Chiffrage et dechiffrage: les institutions demographiques dans l'Inde du sud coloniale.] Annales: Economies, Societes, Civilisations, Vol. 47, No. 4-5, Jul-Oct 1992. 815-40, 1,091 pp. Paris, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
Some issues concerning the collection of statistical data, particularly demographic data, in colonial India are discussed. "The goal of this paper is to understand the cycle of statistical production as it operated in colonial Tamil India. Contrary to the claims of historical and statistical criticism, the data collected reveal a great deal about the indigenous population. And it is wrong to presume that the people passively submitted to the 'idle curiosity' of an eccentric government without leaving any meaningful collective imprint on the 'raw' demographic data. My contention is that the process of demographic observation has to be considered as the site of intense social and cultural negotiations that prefigured experiences and expectations of all the actors involved."
Correspondence: C. Z. Guilmoto, Institut Francais de Recherche pour le Developpement en Cooperation, B.P. 1386, Dakar, Senegal. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10765 Hertrich, Veronique. Relying on existing sources to date specific events. A survey in Mali's Bwa country. [Apport des sources existantes a la datation des evenements. Une enquete en pays bwa au Mali.] Population, Vol. 47, No. 5, Sep-Oct 1992. 1,263-92 pp. Paris, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
The author evaluates the use of such sources as civil registers and records from Christian missionaries and maternity hospitals in dating biographical events in a rural area of Mali. A methodology for using these types of sources is presented, and possible applications are discussed.
Correspondence: V. Hertrich, Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10766 Noumbissi, Amadou. A modification of Whipple's index. Application to data from Cameroon, Sweden, and Belgium. [L'indice de Whipple modifie: une application aux donnees du Cameroun, de la Suede et de la Belgique.] Population, Vol. 47, No. 4, Jul-Aug 1992. 1,038-41 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
The author applies a modified version of Whipple's index to age-distribution data for Belgium, Cameroon, and Sweden, in an effort to counteract the effects of age misreporting.
Correspondence: A. Noumbissi, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Institut de Demographie, 1 place Montesquieu, Boite Postal 17, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10767 United States. Bureau of the Census (Washington, D.C.). 1992 Annual Research Conference, March 22-25, 1992: proceedings. Nov 1992. ix, 687 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
These are the proceedings of the eighth in a series of annual research conferences conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. These conferences are organized to provide a forum for academic, private sector, and government researchers worldwide to discuss and exchange research results and methods in areas relevant to Census Bureau programs. At this conference, sessions were held on the accuracy of undercount estimates, modeling social changes and ethnographic coverage evaluation, preparing data for analysis and presentation, quality management in statistical agencies, postenumeration survey estimation issues, nonresponse and estimation issues in establishment surveys, health models and estimation, electronic data collection, the quality of unemployment data and small-area estimation, strategies for developing computer-assisted interviewing (CAI) systems, enhancing the usefulness of wage and income data, making technical and management decisions in CAI, bias corrections for survey data, issues in computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) implementation, combining administrative and survey data, interviewer perspectives on computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI), and subnational population and housing estimation.
For the proceedings of the 1991 conference, see 57:40756.
Correspondence: U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

O.2. Registration of Vital Statistics

Studies of the organization and operation of vital statistics at local and national levels, of international comparability, and of special problems.

59:10768 Feinleib, Manning; Zarate, Alvan O. Reconsidering age adjustment procedures: workshop proceedings. Vital and Health Statistics, Series 4: Documents and Committee Reports, No. 29, Pub. Order No. DHHS (PHS) 92-1466. ISBN 0-8406-0464-5. LC 92-25492. Oct 1992. vi, 83 pp. U.S. National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS]: Hyattsville, Maryland. In Eng.
"This report contains papers presented at a workshop held at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on March 7, 1991. The workshop was held in order to address concerns arising from the use of the 1940 U.S. population as a standard for age adjustment of vital rates and to review issues surrounding the use of alternative standards from a variety of perspectives." The workshop recommended that NCHS continue to use the 1940 U.S. population as the basis for calculating age-adjusted death rates.
Correspondence: U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville, MD 20782. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10769 International Institute for Vital Registration and Statistics [IIVRS] (Bethesda, Maryland). Proceedings of the IAOS third independent conference session on civil registration and vital statistics, Ankara, Turkey, September 1992. IIVRS Technical Paper, No. 52, Dec 1992. 13 pp. Bethesda, Maryland. In Eng.
This publication contains the text of four papers presented at a session on civil registration and vital statistics held at the Third Independent Conference of the International Association for Official Statistics, which took place in Ankara, Turkey, on September 22-25, 1992. Three of the papers concern civil registration in Sub-Saharan Francophone Africa, Scotland, and Norway. The fourth paper is a general one that examines international efforts to improve vital statistics and civil registration.
Correspondence: International Institute for Vital Registration and Statistics, 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20814-3998. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10770 United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Statistical Office (New York, New York). Handbook of vital statistics systems and methods. Volume 1: legal, organizational and technical aspects. Studies in Methods, Series F, No. 35; ST/ESA/STAT/SER.F/35, Pub. Order No. E.91.XVII.5. ISBN 92-1-161328-0. 1991. ix, 87 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
This is one of two volumes of a handbook designed to assist those concerned with the registration and statistical aspects of vital statistics. The present volume "considers the historical evolution of civil registration and vital statistics systems, uses of vital records and statistics, the legal frame and administrative structures for civil registration and vital statistics, procedures for recording and reporting vital events, methods to evaluate coverage and quality of civil registration and vital statistics, strategies for improving coverage, timeliness and quality of civil registration and vital statistics, the linkage to the continuous population register and other data collection methods and techniques to estimate vital rates." The geographical focus is worldwide.
For Volume 2, published in 1985, see 51:30788.
Correspondence: U.N. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office, United Nations, New York, NY 10017. Location: U.N. Dag Hammarskjold Library, New York, NY.

O.3. Population Censuses and Registers

Studies of the organization and operation of population censuses and registers at local and national levels, of international comparability, and of special problems.

59:10771 Blancas Espejo, Arturo. The reliability of reliability. [Confiabilidad de la confiabilidad.] Estudios Demograficos y Urbanos, Vol. 6, No. 2, May-Aug 1991. 423-34 pp. Mexico City, Mexico. In Spa.
The author critically analyzes an article by Rodolfo Corona Vazquez that questions the reliability of the preliminary results of the Eleventh Census of Population and Housing, conducted in Mexico in March 1990. The need to define what constitutes "reliability" for preliminary results is stressed.
For the article by Corona Vazquez, published in 1991, see 58:10738.
Correspondence: A. Blancas Espejo, Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, Geografia e Informatica, Censos Nacionales, 03810 Mexico City, DF, Mexico. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10772 Boquet, Yves. The American census of 1990: organization and first results. [Le recensement americain de 1990: organisation et premiers enseignements.] Historiens et Geographes, No. 334, Nov-Dec 1991. 247-76 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
The author describes the methods employed in the 1990 U.S. census and summarizes some of the preliminary results from that census. Topics discussed include changes in the ethnic composition of the population, regional differences in population dynamics, urbanization and counterurbanization, and the implications of these changes for federal funding and political developments.
Correspondence: Y. Boquet, Lycee Francais International Rochambeau, Washington, D.C. Location: Stanford University Library, Stanford, CA.

59:10773 Bryant, Barbara E. The U.S. census: monitor and harbinger of social change. In: American Statistical Association, 1990 proceedings of the Social Statistics Section. [1990]. 27-35 pp. American Statistical Association: Alexandria, Virginia. In Eng.
The author examines data from the first 20 U.S. censuses and from the 1990 census to demonstrate how census data can be used to predict market-sector trends. A discussion by R. M. Stolzenberg is included (pp. 33-5).
Correspondence: B. E. Bryant, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10774 Choldin, Harvey M. How the 1990 Post Enumeration Survey transformed the census adjustment controversy. Applied Demography, Vol. 7, No. 3, Winter 1992. 5-6 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The author briefly examines the controversy surrounding the 1980 U.S. census undercount, including a lawsuit entered against the U.S. Bureau of the Census by the City of New York. He then describes the Post Enumeration Survey (PES), introduced after the 1990 census "to measure census coverage (i.e. undercounts) by place and by race and ethnicity, which had not previously been possible....Results of the 1990 PES show that previous claims about the harmful effects of differential undercounts were exaggerated, but they also [show] that the undercounts and their effects are still there."
Correspondence: H. M. Choldin, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10775 Christopher, A. J. Ethnicity, community and the census in Mauritius, 1830-1990. Geographical Journal, Vol. 158, No. 1, Mar 1992. 57-64 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"The complex ethnic composition of the population of Mauritius has presented major problems of classification and recognition of distinct communities for successive census commissioners. Differing solutions were attempted as the population evolved through immigration and intermarriage. However, intervention to use the classification for political ends finally resulted in the abolition of the ethnic census tabulation altogether." The period covered is from 1830 to 1990.
Correspondence: A. J. Christopher, University of Port Elizabeth, Department of Geography, Port Elizabeth 6000, Cape Province, South Africa. Location: Rutgers University Library, New Brunswick, NJ.

59:10776 Farley, Reynolds. Race, ancestry and Spanish origin: findings from the 1980s and questions for the 1990s. In: American Statistical Association, 1990 proceedings of the Social Statistics Section. [1990]. 11-6 pp. American Statistical Association: Alexandria, Virginia. In Eng.
The author describes census questions concerning race, ancestry, and Spanish origin that appeared in the 1980 and 1990 U.S. censuses. After a historical overview of reasons for obtaining this information, assessments are made about its future usefulness.
Correspondence: R. Farley, University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University, Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2590. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10777 Germany. Statistisches Bundesamt (Wiesbaden, Germany). Population census of May 25, 1987. No. 12. Preparation, implementation, and methodological studies of the 1987 population census. [Volkszahlung vom 25. Mai 1987. Heft 12. Vorbereitung, Durchfuhrung und methodische Untersuchungen zur Volkszahlung 1987.] Fachserie 1: Bevolkerung und Erwerbstatigkeit, Aug 1992. 724 pp. Wiesbaden, Germany. In Ger.
The methodology used in the 1987 census of West Germany is described and evaluated. Part 1 includes information on preparations for the census, the implementation phase, analysis of the data, and evaluation and publication of the results. Part 2 reviews some methodological studies evaluating the 1987 census.
Correspondence: Metzler-Poeschel, Verlagsauslieferung Hermann Leins, Holzwiesenstrasse 2, Postfach 1152, 7408 Kusterdingen, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10778 Gould, John D. "Maori" in the population census, 1971-1991. New Zealand Population Review, Vol. 18, No. 1-2, May-Nov 1992. 35-67 pp. Wellington, New Zealand. In Eng.
"This article reviews the major changes in the concept 'Maori' as used in recent population censuses [in New Zealand]. The emphasis is on the effect of these changes on the consistency and reliability of census data relating to the Maori population, particularly in their role as the generator of historical time series. The changes concerned are considered against the backgrounds of New Zealand's evolving population structure and the thinking of social scientists on race and ethnicity."
Correspondence: J. D. Gould, Victoria University of Wellington, Department of Economic History, 22 Inga Road, Milford, Auckland 9, New Zealand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10779 Johansen, Robert J. Proposed new standard population. In: American Statistical Association, 1990 proceedings of the Social Statistics Section. [1990]. 176-81 pp. American Statistical Association: Alexandria, Virginia. In Eng.
The author discusses the use of the 1940 census as the standard basis for comparative studies of the U.S. population. "This paper proposes two changes:--(i) use of the 1990 enumerated population as the new standard to replace the 1940 population and (ii) a split of the 85 and over age group into two groups, 85-94 and 95 and over, in order to reduce the effects of internal ageing within the current highest age group, and age category of increasing size and interest. The paper will also discuss the use of separate male and female components in the new standard population."
Correspondence: R. J. Johansen, Life Actuarial Services, 56 Pershing Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10705. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10780 Kapoor, P. N. Implications of the provisional results of the census of India, 1991. Journal of Family Welfare, Vol. 37, No. 3, Sep 1991. 10-7 pp. Bombay, India. In Eng.
"The salient features emerging from this review of the provisional results of the 1991 census [of India] are as follows: The annual growth rate of population...has now declined to 2.11 per cent during 1981-91. Out of the fifteen major states...eleven states recorded a decline in the growth rate of population during 1981-91 compared to the previous decade....Literacy levels have increased in the country as well as in each state and union territory, both for males and females during 1981-91....It is estimated that in the absence of the family planning programme, an additional population of about 31 million and 95 million would have been enumerated in the 1981 and 1991 censuses respectively."
Correspondence: P. N. Kapoor, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Department of Family Welfare, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110 001, India. Location: Population Council Library, New York, NY.

59:10781 Nanda, A. R. Overview on the 1991 census: continuity and change. Demography India, Vol. 20, No. 1, Jan-Jun 1991. 1-5 pp. Delhi, India. In Eng.
The author outlines the preparation for and administration of the 1991 census of India. Data collection and analysis procedures are also briefly described, and some publications resulting from the census are listed.
Correspondence: A. R. Nanda, Office of the Registrar General, 2A Mansingh Road, New Delhi 110 011, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10782 Omoluabi, Elisabeth; Levy, Michel L. The Nigerian census. [Le recensement du Nigeria.] Population et Societes, No. 272, Oct 1992. [1-3] pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
The history of census-taking in Nigeria is outlined, with emphasis on the causes of overestimation in recent years. The authors conclude that the 1991 census succeeded in avoiding many of the problems leading to overenumeration and that the census total of 88.5 million population is probably accurate.
Correspondence: E. Omoluabi, Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10783 Rees, P. H. Resources for research: the 1991 census of population. Environment and Planning A, Vol. 24, No. 10, Oct 1992. 1,371-7 pp. London, England. In Eng.
The author discusses population censuses in general and describes their utility for research, with a focus on the arrangements under which researchers at institutes of higher education are being provided with data sets from the census. "Although much of the discussion will be specific to the United Kingdom, many of the issues raised will be important in other countries."
Correspondence: P. H. Rees, University of Leeds, School of Geography, Leeds LS2 9JT, England. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

59:10784 Smith, Daniel S. The meanings of family and household: change and continuity in the mirror of the American census. Population and Development Review, Vol. 18, No. 3, Sep 1992. 421-56, 593-5 pp. New York, New York. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"U.S. census officials in the 1970s changed the label for the person listed first in a household from 'head' to 'householder.' This essay places this shift in terminology into historical perspective by examining the meanings of family concepts held by census-takers and by the Americans they enumerated. Even in the 'traditional' era of the family, roughly before 1800, household headship was more a consequence of other attributes than an independent source of status or power. Both then and in the modern period that followed, the implications of being a head, or one of the heads, of a household depended on the context. While a more individualistic notion of the family has developed, there is still considerable continuity in the conceptions of the family."
Correspondence: D. S. Smith, University of Illinois, Department of History, Chicago, IL 60680. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10785 Srinivasan, K. The demographic scenario revealed by the 1991 census figures. Journal of Family Welfare, Vol. 37, No. 3, Sep 1991. 3-9 pp. Bombay, India. In Eng.
The author provides a brief overview of the results from the 1991 census of India. Consideration is given to overall growth, with a concentration on the sex ratio and female literacy.
Correspondence: K. Srinivasan, International Institute for Population Sciences, Govandi Station Road, Deonar, Bombay 400 088, India. Location: Population Council Library, New York, NY.

59:10786 United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Statistical Office (New York, New York). Emerging trends and issues in population and housing censuses. Studies in Methods, Series F, No. 52; ST/ESA/STAT/SER.F/52, Pub. Order No. E.91.XVII.4. ISBN 92-1-161327-2. 1991. v, 34 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"[This] report comprises three chapters. The first summarizes national practices and frequencies of census-taking, as well as those topics investigated by countries in the 1980 census round as compared with the 1970 round. Chapter II deals with a number of issues that are emerging as a result of methodological developments and related innovations over the past decade. The third chapter focuses on issues that are of particular significance at the regional level. Dates of national population and/or housing censuses taken in the 1980 decade, covering the period 1975-1984 appear in an annex." The geographical focus is worldwide.
Correspondence: U.N. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office, United Nations, New York, NY 10017. Location: U.N. Dag Hammarskjold Library, New York, NY.

59:10787 United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Statistical Office (New York, New York). Handbook of population and housing censuses. Part II: demographic and social characteristics. Studies in Methods, Series F, Rev. ed. No. 54; ST/ESA/STAT/SER F/54, Pub. Order No. E.91.XVII.9. ISBN 92-1-161333-7. 1992. viii, 177 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
This is one in a series of handbooks developed by the United Nations to assist countries carrying out population censuses. The handbooks are periodically revised to reflect new developments and emerging issues as well as national experience in conducting censuses. "The present volume...comprises nine chapters dealing with the following selected topics on demographic and social characteristics: age and sex, marital status, fertility, mortality, citizenship, language, national and/or ethnic characteristics, religion and disability."
Correspondence: U.N. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (UN).

59:10788 Volkov, A. 1991 Austrian population census. [Perepis' naseleniya Avstrii 1991 g.] Vestnik Statistiki, No. 9, 1991. 57-61 pp. Moscow, USSR. In Rus.
The author describes the basic methodology employed in the 1991 Austrian census as well as the topics covered. Lessons from the Austrian experience that could be applied to Soviet censuses are considered.
Correspondence: A. Volkov, State Committee on Statistics, Scientific Research Institute, Moscow, Russia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

O.4. Surveys

Studies of periodic or special surveys relevant to population studies, excluding KAP (knowledge, attitudes, and practice of family planning) studies, which are coded under F.4.4. Attitudes Toward Fertility and Fertility Control .

59:10789 Anderson, Barbara A.; Puur, Allan; Silver, Brian D.; Soova, Henry; Voormann, Rein. Use of a lottery as an incentive to increase survey participation. Population Studies Center Research Report, No. 92-242, Jul 1992. [19] pp. University of Michigan, Population Studies Center: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
The authors evaluate the use of a lottery as a means of increasing survey participation. "The survey was designed as a validation study of abortion, and was conducted in Tallinn, Estonia in April-May 1992. The sample consisted of 360 women who had a registered abortion during 1991. The lottery acted as a strong incentive for the women in the sample to become respondents."
Correspondence: University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1070. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10790 Becker, Stan; Sosa, Doris. An experiment using a month-by-month calendar in a family planning survey in Costa Rica. Studies in Family Planning, Vol. 23, No. 6, Pt. 1, Nov-Dec 1992. 386-91 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"In the 1986 survey of Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning in Costa Rica, approximately one-half of the 3,527 women interviewed were administered a questionnaire with traditional fertility and family planning questions; the other half were asked virtually the same questions, but the women's responses were entered in a month-by-month calendar. The assignment of questionnaire type was randomly alternated by cluster. Comparisons of the number of events (live births, pregnancy losses, and contraceptive use) showed that more events were recorded among the women in the calendar group. Significantly less erroneous superposition of events (contraceptive use in the last trimester of pregnancy and hormonal contraceptive use in the first month postpartum) was noted when the calendar was used."
Correspondence: S. Becker, Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Population Dynamics, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10791 Biemer, Paul P.; Forsman, Gosta. On the quality of reinterview data with application to the Current Population Survey. JASA: Journal of the American Statistical Association, Vol. 87, No. 420, Dec 1992. 915-23 pp. Alexandria, Virginia. In Eng.
"The [U.S.] Current Population Survey (CPS) reinterview sample consists of two subsamples: (a) a sample of CPS households is reinterviewed and the discrepancies between the reinterview responses and the original interview responses are reconciled for the purpose of obtaining more accurate responses..., and (b) a sample of CPS households, nonoverlapping with sample (a), is reinterviewed 'independently' of the original interview for the purpose of estimating simple response variance (SRV). In this article a model and estimation procedure are proposed for obtaining estimates of SRV from subsample (a) as well as the customary estimates of SRV from subsample (b)....Data from the CPS reinterview program for both subsamples (a) and (b) are analyzed both (1) to illustrate the methodology and (2) to check the validity of the CPS reinterview data. Our results indicate that data from subsample (a) are not consistent with the data from subsample (b) and provide convincing evidence that errors in subsample (a) are the source of the inconsistency."
Correspondence: P. P. Biemer, Research Triangle Institute, Statistical Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194. Location: Princeton University Library (SM).

59:10792 Bryant, Barbara E. How surveys are changing at the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Asian and Pacific Population Forum, Vol. 6, No. 3, Fall 1992. 69-77 pp. Honolulu, Hawaii. In Eng.
"This article describes the survey activities of the U.S. Census Bureau and recent efforts by the bureau to move toward a more fully automated environment....[It] focuses on four areas in which the Census Bureau is changing its approach to surveys: (1) redesigning the questionnaire for the Current Population Survey to better reflect current labor force conditions; (2) redesigning the same questionnaire to gain advantages from computer-assisted interviewing; (3) redesigning the samples for household surveys to be used during the next decade, a task undertaken after every decennial census; and (4) progress in changing to a computer-assisted survey information collection (CASIC) system and developing a data management network for all Census Bureau surveys."
Correspondence: B. E. Bryant, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10793 Kim, Seung-Kwon; Kong, Sae-Kwon. Changes in the national family planning and fertility surveys in Korea. Journal of Population, Health and Social Welfare, Vol. 11, No. 2, Dec 1991. 1-18 pp. Seoul, Korea, Republic of. In Kor. with sum. in Eng.
The authors review the evolution since the 1960s of South Korea's family planning and fertility survey programs. "In the 1960s, research was interested in respondents' contraception knowledge and practice rate and in the relationships between contraceptive knowledge and the practice rate....[The] major research emphasis in the 1970s and 1980s was measuring fertility and finding obstacles or problems to family planning projects." Recommendations for future research are made.
Correspondence: S.-K. Kim, Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, San 42-14, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyung-ku, Seoul 122-040, Republic of Korea. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10794 Lloyd, Cynthia B.; Marquette, Catherine M.; Lam, Lauren. Directory of surveys in developing countries: data on families and households, 1975-92. ISBN 0-87834-074-2. LC 92-62578. 1992. xxii, 312 pp. Population Council: New York, New York. In Eng.
This is a directory of developing country surveys that have collected simultaneous data on up to 10 specific aspects of fertility, child welfare, the economic role of parents, and household characteristics. The information, which was collected by mailed questionnaire, covers the period 1975-1992 and is presented separately by country. Information is provided where available on the survey name, date, agency, program, sample size, coverage, specifics, rounds, data type, and comments. Finally, a contact name, address, and telephone and fax numbers are provided. Some 306 surveys from 84 countries are included.
Correspondence: Population Council, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Population Council Library, New York, NY.

59:10795 Panicker, Mini N. A study on biases in age reporting. Journal of Family Welfare, Vol. 37, No. 2, Jun 1991. 68-75 pp. Bombay, India. In Eng.
The author examines bias in age reporting by survey respondents in India and considers age, sex, and religion of respondents, using data from the 1980 Kerala Fertility Survey.
Correspondence: M. N. Panicker, University of Kerala, Department of Demography and Population Studies, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 581, India. Location: Population Council Library, New York, NY.

59:10796 Population Council (New York, New York). Dominican Republic 1991: results from the Demographic and Health Survey. Studies in Family Planning, Vol. 23, No. 5, Sep-Oct 1992. 336-40 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
Data from the 1991 Dominican Republic Demographic and Health Survey are presented in tabular format. Topics covered include fertility trends and preferences, current contraceptive use, infant mortality, and nutritional and health status.
Correspondence: Population Council, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

59:10797 Population Council (New York, New York). Jordan 1990: results from the Demographic and Health Survey. Studies in Family Planning, Vol. 23, No. 6, Pt. 1, Nov-Dec 1992. 396-400 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
These are the summary results from the 1990 Jordan Demographic and Health Survey, which covered 16,296 households and 6,461 ever-married women aged 15-49. Tabular data are included on population characteristics, fertility, fertility preferences, current contraceptive usage, contraception, marital status, infant mortality, postpartum variables, nutritional status, and the prevention and treatment of disease.
Correspondence: Population Council, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


Copyright © 1993-1996, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.