Volume 58 - Number 4 - Winter 1992

H. Migration

Studies that treat quantitative data on migration analytically. Methodological studies concerned primarily with migration are coded in this division and cross-referenced to N. Methods of Research and Analysis Including Models , as appropriate. Includes some consideration of policy aspects, but studies relating primarily to policies designed to affect migration are coded under M.3. Measures Affecting Migration .

H.1. General Migration

Studies that concern both international and internal migration.

58:40517 Burda, Michael; Wyplosz, Charles. Human capital, investment and migration in an integrated Europe. CEPR Discussion Paper, No. 614, Dec 1991. 10 pp. Centre for Economic Policy Research [CEPR]: London, England. In Eng.
"The short- and longer-term regional consequences of migration for European aggregate supply are examined in a simple model in which human capital enters the production function externally. The planner chooses a reallocation of population across East and West that cannot be replicated by the market without taxes or subsidies. The market solution in this model with free migration is always associated with an efficiency loss and might lead to the 'Mezzogiorno syndrome' in the East."
Correspondence: Centre for Economic Policy Research, 6 Duke of York Street, London SW1Y 6LA, England. Location: World Bank, Joint Bank-Fund Library, Washington, D.C.

58:40518 Cole, John P.; Filatotchev, Igor V. Some observations on migration within and from the former USSR in the 1990s. Post-Soviet Geography, Vol. 33, No. 7, Sep 1992. 432-53 pp. Silver Spring, Maryland. In Eng.
"Patterns of population distribution revealed from 1989 census data are used to assess how future population movements could be affected by current political, social, and economic changes. Much migration in the USSR has reflected central planning decisions as much as the spontaneous decisions of individuals. To the extent that the influence of the command economy diminishes and a market economy emerges, major new directions of migration flows can be expected. The return of ethnic 'expatriates' to home republics can be expected to increase, as can economic migration to areas with favorably perceived economic prospects, and migration to Central and Western Europe."
Correspondence: J. P. Cole, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:40519 Goldscheider, Calvin. Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies. Brown University Studies in Population and Development, ISBN 0-8133-8536-9. LC 92-2521. 1992. xxi, 322 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This volume contains 13 studies [by various authors on] major migration themes. Included are case studies of migration in industrialized nations and in Third World countries, evaluations of the role of policy and the state in shaping migration patterns, and analyses of the links between migration and the composition, structure, and geographic distribution of populations. Many of the chapters assess the adequacy of data sources to examine these emerging migration patterns and reorganize existing data sources to compare and evaluate themes associated with migration; several present data from specially designed surveys to capture particular aspects of migration and redistribution." The geographical scope is worldwide.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Westview Press, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301-2847. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40520 Hercowitz, Zvi; Pines, David. Migration with fiscal externalities. Journal of Public Economics, Vol. 46, No. 2, Nov 1991. 163-80 pp. Amsterdam, Netherlands. In Eng.
"This paper analyses the distribution of a country's population among regions when migration involves fiscal externalities. The main question addressed is whether a decentralized decision making [by] regional governments can produce an optimal population distribution...or a centralized intervention is indispensable, as argued before in the literature....It turns out that, while with costless mobility the fiscal externality is fully internalized by voluntary interregional transfers, with costly mobility, centrally coordinated transfers still remain indispensable for achieving the socially optimal allocation."
Correspondence: Z. Hercowitz, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40521 Le Bris, Emile; Quesnel, Andre. Migration and urbanization: the limitations of policy. [Circulation des hommes et urbanisation: les politiques en echec.] Politique Africaine, No. 44, Dec 1991. 66-77 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
The authors review urbanization and migration trends in Africa. They conclude that the characteristics of urbanization are changing significantly and that these changes have political as well as socioeconomic implications that require the development of new policies.
Correspondence: E. Le Bris, Institut Francais de Recherche pour le Developpement en Cooperation, 24 rue Bayard, 75008 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40522 Maingot, Anthony P. Small country development and international labor flows: experiences in the Caribbean. Series on Development and International Migration in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Basin, Vol. 5, ISBN 0-8133-8341-2. LC 91-8634. 1991. xv, 266 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/London, England. In Eng.
This is a collection of 10 studies by various authors on the relationship between migration and development in the Caribbean. The primary focus is on how such migration affects the regions of origin. The prospects for developing policies that can maximize the benefits of these migrations are considered.
Correspondence: Westview Press, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301-2847. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40523 Morozova, G. F. Modern migration events: refugees and emigrants. [Sovremennye migratsionnye yavleniya: bezhentsy i emigranty.] Sotsiologicheskie Issledovaniya, No. 3, 1992. 34-40 pp. Moscow, Russia. In Rus.
The author notes that the major concern with regard to migration in the former Soviet Union has switched from internal to international migration. The political, ecological, and economic factors that have brought about this change are discussed. The growing emigration of skilled workers and international refugees fleeing from Soviet problems is noted. The author suggests that such emigration is encouraged not only by conditions in the former USSR but also by the growing international effort to assist refugees in their new countries of choice. The need for a new migration policy is noted.
Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:40524 Pedraza, Silvia. Women and migration: the social consequences of gender. Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 17, 1991. 303-25 pp. Palo Alto, California. In Eng.
"This paper reviews the literature on the neglected role of women in migration. It argues that focusing on gender and the family can provide the necessary linkage of micro and macro levels of analyses. Striving to contribute to a gendered understanding of the social process of migration, the review organizes the literature along these major issues: How is gender related to the decision to migrate--i.e. what are the causes and consequences of female or male-dominated flows of migration? What are the patterns of labor market incorporation of women immigrants--i.e. what accounts for their participation in the labor force and their occupational concentration? What is the relationship of the public and the private--i.e. what is the impact of work roles on family roles and of the experience of migration on the immigrants themselves? Throughout, the necessity to understand how ethnicity, class, and gender interact in the process of migration and settlement is stressed."
Correspondence: S. Pedraza, University of Michigan, Department of Sociology, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Location: Princeton University Library (SSRC).

58:40525 Radcliffe, Sarah A. Women's lives and peasant livelihood strategies: a study of migration in the Peruvian Andes. Pub. Order No. BRDX95861. 1986. 406 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This work was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at the University of Liverpool, England.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(2).

58:40526 Tienda, Marta; Wilson, Franklin D. Migration and the earnings of Hispanic men. American Sociological Review, Vol. 57, No. 5, Oct 1992. 661-78 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"We investigate the relationship between geographic mobility and the earnings of Hispanic men and white men using the 1980 [U.S.] Public Use Sample. Migration status and labor force participation status are treated as joint selection processes and are incorporated into the earnings models. Despite the distinctive social and residential profiles of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban men, results show that residence in a concentrated ethnic area deters migration for all groups, even though they experience modest earnings penalties....Because much research on the Hispanic population has documented differences according to national origin, it is noteworthy that our findings shows similar effects of residence in concentrated ethnic areas on migration probabilities and only trivial effects of migration on earnings for all groups. However, consistent with prior research on economic inequality, the effects of residence in an area of ethnic concentration and area wage rates on earnings differed among Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans."
Correspondence: M. Tienda, University of Chicago, Population Research Center, Chicago, IL 60637. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40527 Xie, Yu. New models for comparing mobility tables: a log-multiplicative approach. Population Studies Center Research Report, No. 91-216, Jun 1991. 22, [11] pp. University of Michigan, Population Studies Center: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
"This paper proposes new models for comparing mobility tables that constrain cross-table variation in the origin-destination association as the log-multiplicative product of a common association pattern and a table-specific parameter....The new models provide one-parameter tests and thus facilitate analyses of the difference in 'vertical mobility' between two mobility tables....Properties of the new models are demonstrated using three data sets previously analyzed in comparative mobility research...."
Correspondence: University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1070. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.2. International Migration

Studies concerned with international migration, including the brain drain.

58:40528 Baldwin-Edwards, M. Immigration after 1992. Policy and Politics, Vol. 19, No. 3, Jul 1991. 199-211 pp. Bristol, England. In Eng.
"This paper outlines European trends in immigration and national policy regimes, focusing in particular on the social rights of established immigrants; part three looks at recent European transnational measures--mostly inspired by the 1992 initiative. Finally some of the implications of 1992 for immigrants in Europe are explored."
Correspondence: M. Baldwin-Edwards, Victoria University of Manchester, of Social Policy and Social Work, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40529 Bernatowicz, Adam. Polish migration policies: challenges and dilemmas. Migration World, Vol. 20, No. 3, 1992. 11-4 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
Following a brief historical overview of Polish migration policies and trends, current post-Communism migration is examined. The focus is on "two...types of Polish emigration....The first, continuing over the last two decades, is temporary labor emigration, when emigres spend two to three years (especially overseas) or a few months (in Western Europe) working outside of Poland. The second model of movement of Poles abroad is short-term private business excursions to different regions of Europe and Asia." The author examines "which migration policies will be beneficial to Poland's political and economic systems, as the country enters a new phase of development."
Correspondence: A. Bernatowicz, Ministry of the Interior, Warsaw, Poland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40530 Carmichael, Gordon A. Beware the passenger card! Australian and New Zealand data on population movement between the two countries. Working Papers in Demography, No. 35, 1992. 30 pp. Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences: Canberra, Australia. In Eng.
"This paper reports on idiosyncrasies of [the] official national migration databases [of Australia and New Zealand], most of which became apparent as a result of trying to account for marked differences in their estimates of both migratory and more short-term population movement between the two countries, and for variation over time in the pattern of differences. It is shown that the use of apparently similar broad classification principles, by different countries and through time within a country, can create an impression of comparability and continuity that may be quite misleading."
Correspondence: Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, P.O. Box 4, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40531 Chang, Parris; Deng, Zhiduan. The Chinese brain drain and policy options. Studies in Comparative International Development, Vol. 27, No. 1, Spring 1992. 44-60 pp. New Brunswick, New Jersey. In Eng.
The authors discuss the growing problem caused by the increasing reluctance of Chinese receiving higher education overseas to return to China following completion of their studies. They note that the Tiananmen incident of June 1989 exacerbated this problem. The policy options open to the Chinese government are reviewed.
Correspondence: P. Chang, Pennsylvania State University, Center for East Asian Studies, University Park, PA 16802. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:40532 Chang, Shirley L. Causes of brain drain and solutions: the Taiwan experience. Studies in Comparative International Development, Vol. 27, No. 1, Spring 1992. 27-43 pp. New Brunswick, New Jersey. In Eng.
"This article examines brain drain, its origin in Taiwan, and government response. One of the major findings of this study is that the elite emigration in Taiwan has been caused by a host of complex academic, social, economic, and personal factors." The author notes that the brain drain from Taiwan to the United States is primarily an outflow of college graduates rather than of trained scientists and engineers. Measures developed by the Taiwanese government to recruit overseas graduates back to Taiwan are described.
Correspondence: S. L. Chang, Lock Haven University, Stevenson Library, Lock Haven, PA 17745. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:40533 Collicelli, Carla. Migration: a growing phenomenon, foreign immigration in Italy. [Migrazioni: un fenomeno in rimonta, l'immigrazione straniera in Italia.] Affari Sociali Internazionali, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1990. 103-12 pp. Milan, Italy. In Ita.
The author summarizes the results of an official report published in 1989 on the increase in immigration in Italy.
Correspondence: C. Collicelli, Centro Studi Investimenti Sociali, Rome, Italy. Location: New York Public Library.

58:40534 Diaz-Briquets, Sergio; Weintraub, Sidney. Migration impacts of trade and foreign investment: Mexico and Caribbean Basin countries. Series on Development and International Migration in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Basin, Vol. 3, ISBN 0-8133-8339-0. LC 91-8057. 1991. xv, 301 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
This is one in a series of volumes presenting essays by various authors on the relationship between development and international migration. "The chapters in this volume tend to affirm the conclusion that although increases in direct foreign investment and exports are essential to Mexican and Caribbean Basin growth and to the long-term reduction of undocumented migration, these strategies are not sufficient by themselves to achieve either goal. The export-led growth policy that practically all of these countries is pursuing must be complemented by efforts to develop their internal markets."
Correspondence: Westview Press, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40535 Edmonston, Barry; Passel, Jeffrey S. U.S. immigration and ethnicity in the 21st century. Population Today, Vol. 20, No. 10, Oct 1992. 6-7 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The authors attempt to predict future U.S. immigration trends in light of changing policies. "Changes in policy and the presence of illegal entrants complicates measuring and projecting immigration flows. Acknowledging the risks, this article sketches the possible long-term impact of the immigration trends we observe today, if they were to continue for the next 50 years. This study uses a modified cohort-component approach for population projections by race/ethnicity and immigrant generation."
Correspondence: B. Edmonston, National Research Council, Committee on National Statistics, 2101 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20418. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40536 Espenshade, Thomas J.; Calhoun, Charles A. Public opinion toward illegal immigration and undocumented migrants in southern California. OPR Working Paper, No. 92-2, Mar 1992. 53, [9] pp. Princeton University, Office of Population Research [OPR]: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
"This paper uses an ordered-probit analysis of public opinion data collected in southern California to test several hypotheses about attitudes toward illegal immigration and undocumented migrants. Only weak support is found for an economic competition hypothesis. There is firmer evidence for hypotheses relating to cultural affinity between respondents and undocumented migrants and to the role of education as it affects one's degree of tolerance for others. Respondents' strategic calculations of tangible costs and benefits to themselves also influence their assessments of illegal immigration. Finally, the results of this analysis provide additional support for the symbolic politics model of opinion formation when it is extended to the issue of undocumented migration to the United States."
Correspondence: Princeton University, Office of Population Research, 21 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, NJ 08544-2091. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40537 Funkhouser, Edward. Migration from Nicaragua: some recent evidence. World Development, Vol. 20, No. 8, Aug 1992. 1,209-18 pp. Tarrytown, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"I utilize two unique data sources to examine migration from and remittance flows to the capital city of Managua, Nicaragua. Approximately 10-12% of the population has emigrated. These emigrants tend to be disproportionately of working age, better educated, and more often white-collar workers than nonmigrants. In addition, emigrants are more likely to come from larger premigration households and higher income households. Remittance flows to Managua are quite large--the second largest source of foreign exchange earnings after coffee. In addition, remittances have a negative income effect on labor force participation and a positive effect on self-employment of nonmigrants."
Correspondence: E. Funkhouser, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:40538 Gardev, Kostadin. The emigration of Bulgarians to North America. [Emigrivaneto na balgarite v Severna Amerika.] Naselenie, No. 3, 1992. 21-33 pp. Sofia, Bulgaria. In Bul. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
The author gives a historical overview of emigration from Bulgaria to North America, beginning in the 1870s. The effects of changes in migration policy and economic conditions in Bulgaria are described.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40539 Ghosh, Bimal. East-West migration: the European perspective. Current trends and prospects beyond 1992. [La migracion este-oeste: la perspectiva europea. Tendencias actuales y perspectivas para despues de 1992.] Revista de la OIM sobre Migraciones en America Latina/IOM Latin American Migration Journal, Vol. 10, No. 1, Apr 1992. 5-56 pp. Santiago, Chile. In Eng; Spa.
"This...paper seeks to discern the current situation in East-West migration, including migratory movements within, and towards East Europe, and its possible trends beyond 1993. In so doing it takes into account some of the major policy and operational measures which are being taken or are contemplated by the governments of East and West Europe." Consideration is given to the determinants of East-West migration, sources of possible future migratory pressures, the impact of the formation of the European Community on migratory flows, and movements to and within Eastern Europe.
Correspondence: B. Ghosh, International Organization for Migration, Center for European Political and Economic Analysis, P.O. Box 71, 1211 Geneva 19, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40540 Glaz'ev, S. Yu.; Malkov, L. P. The "brain drain" and social consciousness. Problems of Economic Transition, Vol. 35, No. 6, Oct 1992. 50-64 pp. Armonk, New York. In Eng.
The brain drain being experienced by the former USSR following the liberalization of international relations and emigration laws is described. The authors note that total emigration has increased to about 500,000 per year and that a further 7 million persons, many of whom are highly qualified, are expected to emigrate over the next decade. The possibilities of developing conditions in the former USSR that will decrease this loss are explored.
Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:40541 Hornsby, Stephen J. Patterns of Scottish emigration to Canada, 1750-1870. Journal of Historical Geography, Vol. 18, No. 4, Oct 1992. 397-416 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"Based on a sample of 7,478 Scottish emigrants, this paper sets out the changing temporal and spatial patterns of Scottish emigration and settlement in pre-Confederation Canada. It identifies where Scottish emigrants came from, where they went in Canada, and whether discrete channels of migration existed. It argues that Scottish emigration consisted of distinct Highland and Lowland flows."
Correspondence: S. J. Hornsby, University of Maine, Canadian-American Center, 154 College Avenue, Orono, ME 04473. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:40542 Ireland, Patrick R. Facing the true "Fortress Europe": immigrant and politics in the EC. Journal of Common Market Studies, Vol. 29, No. 5, Sep 1991. 457-80 pp. Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author examines the implications for the immigrant population of the European Community's plans for closer union in 1992. "After considering the positions that European institutions have taken regarding non-citizens' political rights in the EC, I trace the development of an active immigrant political role at the European level since the early 1970s."
Correspondence: P. R. Ireland, Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40543 Jalal ad-Din, Mohammad al-A. Patterns, trends and future of international migration: some causes and consequences. Population Bulletin of ESCWA, No. 34, Jun 1989. 45-61 pp. Amman, Jordan. In Eng.
"This study examines the main trends of various models of international migration for the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and places emphasis on the volume and direction of various models of migration at present. Permanent migration, illegal migration in search of work and compulsory migration (refugees) are discussed in some detail with reference to the occasional difficulty of distinguishing between the various types of migration. When discussing the volume and sources of migration, the study indicates some of its motives and implications at origin and at destination and presents some of the future prospects and major factors that contribute to the continuation of the flow of the different types of migration." The geographical scope is worldwide.
Correspondence: M. al-A. Jalal ad-Din, Arab Planning Institute, POB 5834, 13059 Safat, Kuwait. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40544 James, Daniel. Illegal immigration--an unfolding crisis. ISBN 0-8191-8404-7. LC 91-24879. 1991. xi, 155 pp. University Press of America: Lanham, Maryland/London, England; Mexico-United States Institute: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The problems posed by large-scale illegal migration from Mexico to the United States are examined. Causes of that immigration are first described, with a focus on Mexico's rapid population growth. The author then discusses the effect of illegal immigration on U.S. sovereignty. Other topics include the burden on social services and public assistance, the effect on the labor market, the increase in border violence, illegal immigrants and drug traffic, and the threat of urban racial tension. The relative merits of both separatism and assimilation for illegal migrants are considered, and the author discusses whether a threat to U.S. security is posed. Finally, he examines what should be done about illegal immigration.
Correspondence: University Press of America, 4720 Boston Way, Lanham, MD 20706. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40545 Keyfitz, Nathan. The political context of immigration: Europe and America. Migration World, Vol. 20, No. 3, 1992. 15-20 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
The author examines and compares the immigration acculturation philosophies of Europe and the United States. He finds that "present [discrimination] problems throughout Europe show the enormous difficulty of accepting foreigners for countries whose nationhood depends on the ideal common ancestry. The United States on the whole has been heterogeneous almost from the start, and has had unprecedented success in making a community out of culturally heterogeneous elements." Recommendations for future research are included.
Correspondence: N. Keyfitz, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40546 Kojanec, Giovanni. Income, length of stay, and employment of foreigners in Italy. [L'ingresso, il soggiorno ed il lavoro degli stranieri in Italia.] Affari Sociali Internazionali, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1990. 47-70 pp. Milan, Italy. In Ita.
The author uses recent official Italian data to examine some characteristics of immigrants in Italy, including income, length of stay, and labor force participation.
Correspondence: G. Kojanec, Universita di Roma la Sapienza, Via Nomentana 41, 00161 Rome, Italy. Location: New York Public Library.

58:40547 Kraly, Ellen P.; Warren, Robert. Estimates of long-term immigration to the United States: moving U.S. statistics toward United Nations concepts. Demography, Vol. 29, No. 4, Nov 1992. 613-26 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"U.S. immigration data are revised to reflect the U.N. demographic concept of long-term immigration. Long-term immigration is measured by the number of new immigrants (permanent resident aliens) arriving in the year, temporary migrant arrivals (nonimmigrants) who subsequently adjust to permanent resident status, arrivals of asylees and refugees, and nonimmigrants who arrive during the year and stay for more than twelve months before departing. The estimates of long-term immigration for 1983 are compared to official INS statistics on alien immigration. Significant differences emerge according to country of origin, age, and state of intended residence. A method of producing current estimates of long-term immigration is illustrated."
This is a revised version of a paper originally presented at the 1990 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America.
Correspondence: E. P. Kraly, Colgate University, Department of Geography, Hamilton, NY 13346. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40548 Larrabee, F. Stephen. Down and out in Warsaw and Budapest: Eastern Europe and East-West migration. International Security, Vol. 16, No. 4, Spring 1992. 5-33 pp. Cambridge, Massachusetts. In Eng.
The author examines the implications and policy dilemmas posed by potential migrations from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The article "is divided into five parts. The first section examines the pattern and possible dimensions of migration from the former Soviet Union. The second section discusses the problem posed for Eastern Europe by increased migration from the former Soviet Union and the efforts undertaken by these countries to cope with this increased migration. The third section focuses on the problem of migration within Eastern Europe itself....The fourth section examines the impact of migration from the East to the Federal Republic of Germany...and the policy dilemmas that this migration poses. A final section focuses on the future policy agenda and the ways in which East and West might cooperate to control and manage the population outflows."
Correspondence: F. S. Larrabee, RAND Corporation, International Policy Department, 1700 Main Street, P.O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40549 Long, John F.; Pryor, Edward T. Comparative demographic effects of Canadian-U.S. immigration flows. Statistical Journal of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, Vol. 5, No. 2, Aug 1988. 135-57 pp. Amsterdam, Netherlands. In Eng.
"A joint study by Statistics Canada and the U.S. Bureau of the Census examines special tabulations of U.S. residents born in Canada from the 1980 census of the United States and compares them with matching tabulations of Canadian residents born in the United States from the 1981 census of Canada. As might be expected, the two populations are remarkably similar and the preponderance of the migration flow is from Canada to the United States. The comparative social and economic characteristics of the two migrant stocks show the effects of increasing legal restrictions on migration between the two countries in the last two decades. The characteristics of the migrant flows have changed from large, unregulated population movements responding to economic motivations similar to internal migration flows to a much smaller, highly controlled movement more typical of long-distance international migration flows."
This is a revised version of a paper originally presented at the 1987 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America.
Correspondence: J. F. Long, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Population Projections Branch, Suitland, MD 20233. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40550 Macioti, Maria I. Foreigners in Italy. [Stranieri in Italia.] Affari Sociali Internazionali, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1990. 121-30 pp. Milan, Italy. In Ita.
The author summarizes some of the findings presented at a 1990 conference on immigration to Italy from outside the European Community. The focus is on the characteristics of immigrants.
Correspondence: M. I. Macioti, Universita di Roma la Sapienza, Dipartimento di Sociologia, Via Nomentana 41, 00161 Rome, Italy. Location: New York Public Library.

58:40551 Macisco, John J. International migration: issues and research needs. In: Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies, edited by Calvin Goldscheider. 1992. 229-48 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
Major international migration issues are examined and policy strategies, both current and projected, are described. Consideration is given to economic, political, educational, and kinship factors, as well as to the impacts of migration on the countries involved, on migrant rights, and on those left behind. "Numerous global changes have exacerbated the normally chaotic world of international migration. Government actions have the potential to change the volume and direction of migration significantly and to respond to its social, economic, and cultural impact. Economic dislocations similarly may generate new, different patterns of international migration."
Correspondence: J. J. Macisco, Fordham University, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40552 Macpherson, Cluny. Economic and political restructuring and the sustainability of migrant remittances: the case of Western Samoa. Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 4, No. 1, Spring 1992. 109-35 pp. Honolulu, Hawaii. In Eng.
This study examines the importance of remittances from emigrants to the economies of Pacific island states. The author considers two basic questions: "Are there enough island-born or island-linked people in the labor forces of industrialized countries to generate a given level of remittances to the island states?...[and] Will those who are able to sustain the flow be willing to? In this paper I examine the case of remittance flows between New Zealand and Western Samoa."
Correspondence: C. Macpherson, Office of Transition, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Saipan, Northern Marianas. Location: New York Public Library.

58:40553 Mahmoud, Mahgoub El-T. Sudanese emigration to Saudi Arabia: partial modernization and development bureaucratization. In: Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies, edited by Calvin Goldscheider. 1992. 159-79 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"The emigration of Sudanese professionals and skilled workers to Saudi Arabia increased during the 1970s and 1980s, with important implications for both societies....We examine the impact of political institutions and government policies in the Sudan in shaping this brain and labor drain. After reviewing some of the demographic and development contexts, we use the framework of 'partial modernization' as a theoretical guide to connect emigration patterns and bureaucratization in the Sudan....We have used a variety of sources of information to estimate and outline the general patterns."
Correspondence: M. El-T. Mahmoud, National Council for Research, Sudan National Population Committee, Khartoum, Sudan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40554 Martin, Philip L. International migration: a new challenge. International Economic Insights, No. 3, Mar-Apr 1992. 2-6 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
This is a general review of global trends in international migration, including its current volume and its implications.
Correspondence: P. L. Martin, University of California, Davis, CA 95616. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:40555 Miles, Robert; Singer-Kerel, Jeanne. Migration and migrants in France. Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol. 14, No. 3, Jul 1991. 265-416 pp. Routledge: London, England. In Eng.
This special issue is a product of a conference titled The Economic and Political Consequences of Post-1945 Immigration to France that was held at the University of Glasgow, Scotland, in September 1989. "The articles published here deal with two main issues. First, they provide a historical overview of migration flows into France from the late-nineteenth century up to the 1980s....The second main theme of the articles presented here concerns the political and ideological consequences of post-1945 migration to France."
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Routledge Journals, 11 New Fetter Lane, London EC4P 4EE, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40556 Monticelli, Guiseppe L. Statistics on foreign immigration in Italy following recent changes in the law. [Le statistiche sull'immigrazione estera in Italia dopo le leggi di sanatoria.] Previdenza Sociale, Vol. 46, No. 3, May-Jun 1990. 867-906 pp. Rome, Italy. In Ita. with sum. in Eng.
Trends in immigration to Italy over the course of the 1970s and 1980s are analyzed, with particular attention to the impact of changes in laws concerning immigration. The analysis covers changes over time, the geographical distribution of migrants, countries of origin, and reasons for residing in Italy. Particular attention is given to the impact of changes in the migration law adopted in 1989 and 1990.
Location: U.S. National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD.

58:40557 Moreno, Lorenzo. Migration to the United States and household composition in Mexico. Sep 1992. vi, 43 pp. Mathematica Policy Research: Princeton, New Jersey. In Eng.
"The purpose of this research is to gain some understanding of whether [Mexican] households modify their structure--by changing either their marriage pattern (or nuptiality) or their reproductive behavior--when they enter into the so-called migration syndrome. This concept refers to the 'self-sustaining mechanism' of seasonal or regular trips to the United States by one or more of a household's members to earn the income necessary to achieve a standard of living that cannot be realized through labor activities in the communities of origin. The analysis of data from four sending communities in Western Mexico on the relationship between migration to the United States and household formation and structure suggests that households in which one of the members has ever migrated to the United States might have altered their nuptiality or reproductive behavior to extract the full benefits of the migration. In addition, the analysis also ponders whether higher fertility is promoting migration to the United States...."
Correspondence: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40558 Nawar, Laila; Mostafa, Eman. Demographic and socio-economic impact of external migration on the sending areas (the case of Egypt). Dirasat Sukkaniyah/Population Studies, Vol. 14, No. 75, Jul-Sep 1992. 81-110 pp. Cairo, Egypt. In Eng. with sum. in Ara.
The effects on individuals, households, and the community as a whole of migration from Egypt are examined for the period 1974-1990. The authors evaluate the impact of such migration on population growth and redistribution in Egypt, and describe the economic consequences of emigration, including remittances, for the sending country. Some policy implications are discussed.
Correspondence: L. Nawar, Central Agency for Public Mobilisation and Statistics, Population Policy Analysis Unit, Salah Salem Road, POB 2086, Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40559 Prins, C. J. M.; Nicolaas, H. 120,000 immigrants in 1991. [120 duizend immigranten in 1991.] Maandstatistiek van de Bevolking, Vol. 40, No. 9, Sep 1992. 12-9 pp. Voorburg, Netherlands. In Dut. with sum. in Eng.
Trends in migration are explored for the Netherlands in 1991. Data are presented on immigration by country of origin, asylum seekers, and migrant characteristics, including nationality, sex, and family relationship.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40560 Rubenstein, H. Migration, development and remittances in rural Mexico. International Migration, Vol. 30, No. 2, Jun 1992. 127-53 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
Trends in labor migration from rural Mexico to the United States are analyzed, and factors affecting such migration are examined. In particular, "this paper explores the extent to which...incentives and constraints on overall development and individual economic well-being can be identified in rural parts of Mexico by examining the magnitude of financial flowbacks from migrants, the manner in which cash received is allocated, and the economic impact of repatriated funds on rural areas."
Correspondence: H. Rubenstein, University of Manitoba, Department of Anthropology, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40561 Singer-Kerel, Jeanne. Foreign workers in France, 1891-1936. Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol. 14, No. 3, Jul 1991. 279-93 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"This article provides a historical overview of the migration of foreign labour to France between 1891 and 1936, highlighting both the specificity of the circumstances that prevailed in this period and the similarities with the period after 1945. It demonstrates the extent to which the legislation, the policies, and the flows themselves were determined by the vagaries of the economy in the country of immigration. It emphasizes that there is a subtle, if at times apparently contradictory, connection between the interests of the employers and the actions of the state."
Correspondence: J. Singer-Kerel, Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques, Service d'Etude de l'Activite Economique, 4 rue Michelet, 75006 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40562 Singer, Audrey L. From immigrant to citizen: international migration, the life course and immigration policy in late twentieth century USA. Pub. Order No. DA9212638. 1991. 260 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This work was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at the University of Texas at Austin.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences (52)12.

58:40563 Tapinos, Georges. Immigration to France. [L'immigration en France.] Commentaire, Vol. 11, No. 43, Autumn 1988. 692-702 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
Trends in immigration to France since the imposition of strict controls on immigration in 1973 are analyzed. Some problems associated with these changes are longer stays by migrants, increased immigrant unemployment, and an increase in the social costs associated with immigration. The author suggests that immigration has changed from a primarily economic issue to a political one.
Correspondence: G. Tapinos, Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:40564 Wong, Siu-lun. Emigration and stability in Hong Kong. Asian Survey, Vol. 32, No. 10, Oct 1992. 918-33 pp. Berkeley, California. In Eng.
Current trends in emigration in Hong Kong are reviewed in light of the colony's scheduled 1997 reintegration with China. The author focuses on the alleged negative impact of the large-scale immigration of elites. Comparisons are made with other rapidly growing economies in the region that are also experiencing emigration of similar types of migrants.
Correspondence: S.-l. Wong, University of Hong Kong, Department of Sociology, Hong Kong. Location: Princeton University Library (SPIA).

58:40565 Zakee, R. International demographic developments in 1991 and 1992. [Internationale demografische ontwikkelingen in 1991 en 1992.] Maandstatistiek van de Bevolking, Vol. 40, No. 9, Sep 1992. 20-4 pp. Voorburg, Netherlands. In Dut. with sum. in Eng.
Patterns in international migration in Europe for 1991 and 1992 are analyzed. Consideration is given to migration within Europe and from outside Europe to the continent. The effects of recent political changes in Eastern Europe and Yugoslavia on asylum applications for the Netherlands are also discussed. Some data on population change in Europe are also presented.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40566 Zhu, Guohong. A probe into reasons for international migration in Fujian Province. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1990. 229-46 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
Trends in international migration from Fujian Province, China, to southeast Asia and the rest of the world over the past 100 years are discussed. Consideration is given to types of migration and reasons for migrating. Data are from official and other published sources.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40567 Zimmermann, Klaus F. European migration policy. International Economic Insights, No. 3, Mar-Apr 1992. 7-14 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The author analyzes the economic consequences of immigration for the European Community. The primary focus is on labor migration. Possible conclusions regarding migration policy are examined.
Correspondence: K. F. Zimmermann, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 8000 Munich 22, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

H.3. Internal Migration

Studies concerned with internal migration.

58:40568 Abu-Zant, Maher K. Internal migration and development in Jordan: migrants and social structure in Irbid. Pub. Order No. BRDX96190. 1988. 454 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This work was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at the University of Wales.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1364. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(3).

58:40569 Clark, W. A. V. Comparing cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of residential mobility and migration. Environment and Planning A, Vol. 24, No. 9, Sep 1992. 1,291-302 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"A reevaluation of cross-sectional versus longitudinal models of residential mobility...casts doubt on the study by Davies and Pickles in 1985 in which it was argued that cross-sectional analysis is inadequate....With the use of data from the [U.S.] Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), the conclusion of this reevaluation is that longitudinal analysis increases our understanding of the processes and provides a richer understanding of migration and mobility but does not undermine the work that has been produced from cross-sectional analysis."
Correspondence: W. A. V. Clark, University of California, Department of Geography, Los Angeles, CA 90024. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

58:40570 Cribier, Francoise; Kych, Alexandre. The migration of retired Parisians: an analysis of the propensity to leave. [La migration de retraite des Parisiens: une analyse de la propension au depart.] Population, Vol. 47, No. 3, May-Jun 1992. 677-717 pp. Paris, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
The authors examine the migration from Paris, France, of retirees, using data from two surveys conducted in 1972 and 1984. They find that "more than 25% of every cohort leaves Greater Paris immediately after retirement to live in the provinces....Those who most frequently leave are the youngest couples, childless retired persons, and those who have a child living in the provinces. However, unlike the situation in the United States or Britain, departure rates do not increase as one descends the social scale: they are relatively homogeneous for [the] entire urban society, with the highest rate in the middle third."
Correspondence: F. Cribier, Universite de Paris VII, Equipe de Geographie Sociale et Gerontologie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40571 Crommentuijn, Leon. Household dynamics and migration: theoretical notions and an explorative analysis. PDOD Paper, No. 12, Aug 1992. iv, 22 pp. Universiteit van Amsterdam, Postdoctorale Onderzoekersopleiding Demografie [PDOD]: Amsterdam, Netherlands. In Eng.
The interrelationship between household dynamics and internal migration is explored for the Netherlands. Data are from the 1989-1990 Housing Demand Survey. "The main conclusion of the paper is that migration and household events are related. This simultaneity is irrespective of distance of migration."
Correspondence: Universiteit van Amsterdam, Planologisch en Demografisch Instituut, Postdoctorale Onderzoekersopleiding Demografie, Nieuwe Prinsengracht 130, 1018 VZ Amsterdam, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40572 Darlu, Pierre; Ruffie, Jacques. A study of in-migration among French departments using the surname method. [L'immigration dans les departements francais etudiee par la methode des patronymes.] Population, Vol. 47, No. 3, May-Jun 1992. 719-34 pp. Paris, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
In-migration among the various departments in France is studied using the surname method. "The distribution of surnames in a population may be studied in the same way as the distribution of the number of alleles in a locus. The mutation probabilities per unit of time in the genetic model may be likened to the immigration probabilities in the population studied. This method has been applied to births in the rural communes of France during the years 1891-1915 and 1916-1940. Estimates were correlated with immigration statistics from the censuses of 1891 and 1921 obtained from a comparison between birth place and place of residence."
Correspondence: P. Darlu, Universite Paris VII, Laboratoire d'Anthropologie Biologique, INSERM U155, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 2 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40573 Fik, T. J.; Amey, R. G.; Mulligan, G. F. Labor migration amongst hierarchically competing and intervening origins and destinations. Environment and Planning A, Vol. 24, No. 9, Sep 1992. 1,271-90 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"A spatial interaction methodology is developed for modeling flows in a hierarchical system. A competing and intervening destinations framework is employed to model and predict U.S. state-to-state labor migration. This analysis is used to assess the importance of geographic variables in explaining variations in regional labor flows. Empirical findings suggest that U.S. labor migration is largely explained by...size, distance, locational accessibility, and intervening opportunities in a spatial hierarchy. It is also suggested that lagged migration or migrant stock is a product of the combined effect of these forces."
Correspondence: T. J. Fik, University of Florida, Department of Geography, Gainesville, FL 32611. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

58:40574 Forsythe, Frank P.; Borooah, Vani K. The nature of migration between Northern Ireland and Great Britain: a preliminary analysis based on the Labour Force Surveys, 1986-88. Economic and Social Review, Vol. 23, No. 2, Jan 1992. 105-27 pp. Dublin, Ireland. In Eng.
The authors analyze trends in migration between Northern Ireland and Great Britain using data from the Labour Force Survey, which includes information on migrant characteristics. The results suggest that the migrant population moving between the two regions is strongly bimodal, with the less skilled and less qualified exhibiting a high degree of continued migration mobility within Great Britain.
Correspondence: F. P. Forsythe, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, Northern Ireland. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:40575 Frey, William H. Metropolitan migration in developed countries: a cross-national data base. In: Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies, edited by Calvin Goldscheider. 1992. 1-31 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author describes the "Michigan Metropolitan Migration Project [which was undertaken] to compile age-sex disaggregated migration stream data for 81 comparably defined metropolitan areas (with populations greater than one million or capital cities of their nation) in 14 developed countries of North America, Europe, Japan, and New Zealand....The migration data, descriptive statistics, and projection analyses compiled for this study constitute the first data base appropriate for examining migration stream components of metropolitan area-wide population change and city-suburb redistribution in comparably-defined large metropolitan areas located in most of the world's developed, market economy nations." An illustration of the kinds of analysis possible with this data set is included using data for Canada.
Correspondence: W. H. Frey, University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1070. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40576 Gauthier, Howard L.; Tanaka, Kyoko; Smith, W. Randy. A time series analysis of regional income inequalities and migration in Japan, 1955-1985. Geographical Analysis, Vol. 24, No. 4, Oct 1992. 283-98 pp. Columbus, Ohio. In Eng.
"This study tests the neoclassical concept of interregional migration in post-World War II Japan. The lead-lag relationship between net migration to a core area and regional income inequalities is examined by modeling an ARIMA transfer function. Until 1961, there was a rapid growth in net migration from the periphery to the core area that was accompanied by rapid divergence in regional income inequalities. Since then, migration to the core apparently has declined due to a convergence of regional income inequalities. The time series analysis indicates there has been short-run, as well as long-run, volatility in migration related to cyclical variations in economic performance in the core."
Correspondence: H. L. Gauthier, Ohio State University, Department of Geography, 190 North Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

58:40577 Jackman, Richard; Savouri, Savvas. Regional migration in Britain: an analysis of gross flows using NHS Central Register data. Economic Journal, Vol. 102, No. 415, Nov 1992. 1,433-50 pp. Cambridge, Massachusetts/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The authors analyze internal migration in the United Kingdom based on the concept of job-matching. The basic theory of the "hiring function" is employed, which states that the number of hirings depends on the number of people seeking work and on the number of job vacancies. Using this approach, migration is viewed as a consequence of a successful job search rather than as a precondition for it. A model of interregional migration is developed using data from the National Health Service Central Register.
Correspondence: R. Jackman, London School of Economics, Centre for Economic Performance, London WC2A 2AE, England. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:40578 Karjalainen, Elli. Differentiation of rural areas in Kainuu, Finland. Yearbook of Population Research in Finland, Vol. 30, 1992. 81-94 pp. Helsinki, Finland. In Eng.
Migratory flows in the rural Kainuu region of Finland during the period 1980-1985 are analyzed. "The aim is to examine areal differences in development at the regional and local levels employing migration as the chief indicator....A model for migration within a municipality is constructed, based on the notion that the relations between migration flows alter with time as the municipality or area concerned undergoes the processes of agglomeration of population and modernization."
Correspondence: E. Karjalainen, University of Oulu, Unit of Kainuu, Research Institute of Northern Finland, Kirkkokatu 11A, PL 191, 90570 Oulu, Finland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40579 Masi, Anthony C. Migration and job mobility: some contemporary lessons from Sidney Goldstein's "Patterns of mobility" In: Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies, edited by Calvin Goldscheider. 1992. 33-60 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author maintains that "a careful reading of Patterns of Mobility can help to reinvigorate the debate about the causes and effects of geographic mobility and its relationship to occupational distributions and labor market structures. In order [to] make this case, I shall first discuss some of the current thinking about the potential place of migration in the study of the labor market, and then attempt to illustrate these views with some qualitative and descriptive data from my research on a Southern Italian steel town. I will suggest some directions for future research based on insights to be gained from a closer reading of Goldstein's early book on the topic."
For the book by Sidney Goldstein, published in 1958, see 25:2008.
Correspondence: A. C. Masi, McGill University, Department of Sociology, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T5, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40580 Rahimian, A.; Wolch, J. R.; Koegel, P. A model of homeless migration: homeless men in Skid Row, Los Angeles. Environment and Planning A, Vol. 24, No. 9, Sep 1992. 1,317-36 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"In this paper a conceptual model of homeless migration is developed that links migration behavior with the coping status of homeless individuals. The model is evaluated by using data drawn from a recent random probability sample of men surveyed in Skid Row, Los Angeles, [California]. Results indicate that homeless migrants tended to be young, never married, white, mentally disabled, and either newly or cyclically homeless individuals. Long-term residents, in contrast, were apt to be older, physically disabled or suffering from a health-related problem, and had been homeless for some time. The dominant reason given for moving was to find a job...." Coping strategies and migration behaviors are also described.
Correspondence: A. Rahimian, University of Southern California, Los Angeles Homelessness Project, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0255. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

58:40581 Rowland, Donald T. Family characteristics of internal migration in China. Asia-Pacific Population Journal, Vol. 7, No. 1, Mar 1992. 3-26 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng.
"Using statistics from the 1986 survey of migration to towns and cities in China, conducted by the Chinese Academy of the Social Sciences, this article discusses the family characteristics of migrants and the influence of family considerations as direct and indirect causes of movement. The life-cycle concept provides a focal point for the interpretation of the association between migration and family structure, age, sex, marital status and issue. Family welfare is seen as an important, but latent, factor in internal migration and temporary movement in China. The article brings out some implications for policy, noting that those affecting women require particular attention."
Correspondence: D. T. Rowland, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40582 Stinner, William F.; Van Loon, Mollie. Community size preference status, community satisfaction and migration intentions. Population and Environment, Vol. 14, No. 2, Nov 1992. 177-95 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"We evaluate the influence of community size preference status and six domains of community satisfaction on migration intentions per se and short- vs. longterm migration intentions, separately, simultaneously, and with controls on community involvement and social position....Separate multivariate analyses are conducted for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan residents. Satisfaction/dissatisfaction with selected features of community life primarily impacts migration intentions per se while community size preference status dominates the time frame of migration intentions....The data for this analysis are drawn from a Statewide Migration Telephone Survey conducted in Utah in October, 1988...."
Correspondence: W. F. Stinner, Utah State University, Department of Sociology, Population Research Laboratory, Department of Sociology, Logan, UT 84322-0730. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40583 Strzelecki, Zbigniew. The course of migration in the family life cycle in Poland. Studia Demograficzne, No. 3/105, 1991. 75-89 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Eng.
The author examines family migratory patterns in Poland. He concludes that "spatial mobility of families in Poland is relatively low. To a large extent, it is determined by housing problems in the country."
Correspondence: Z. Strzelecki, Szkola Glowna Handlowa, Al. Niepodleglosci 162, 02-554 Warsaw, Poland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40584 Tanaka, Kyoko. Dynamics of interregional migration and income in Japan during the post-World War II period. Pub. Order No. DA9219035. 1992. 190 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This work was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at Ohio State University.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences 53(2).

58:40585 Van Hecke, Etienne. Migration trends in Belgium, 1977-1990. [De evolutie van de migratietendensen 1977-1990 in de Belgische ruimte.] Bevolking en Gezin, No. 2, 1992. 1-27 pp. Brussels, Belgium. In Dut. with sum. in Eng.
Internal migration patterns in Belgium for the period 1977-1990 are analyzed and compared, with a focus on the impact of economic factors on such migration. "The hypothesis formulated (and confirmed) is that migration, especially when viewed in connection with sub-urbanization, declines during a downward economic trend, and vice versa."
Correspondence: E. Van Hecke, Instituut voor Sociale en Economische Geografie, De Croylaan 42, 3030 Leuven-Heverlee, Belgium. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.4. Settlement and Resettlement

Studies on international and internal settlement and resettlement, including programs concerned with refugees and their settlement and with forced migrations.

No citations in this issue.

H.5. Temporary Migration

Migration, both internal and international, in which the stay is temporary. Includes return migration, transit migration, commuting, and seasonal migration.

58:40586 Enchautegui, Maria E. Subsequent moves and the dynamics of the migration decision: the case of return migration to Puerto Rico. Population Studies Center Research Report, No. 91-219, Apr 1991. 24, [6] pp. University of Michigan, Population Studies Center: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
The author analyzes the dynamics of return migration, using the example of migrants to the United States who returned to their native Puerto Rico after living in the United States for six months or longer.
Correspondence: University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1070. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40587 Enchautegui, Maria E. The value of U.S. labor market experience in the home country: the case of Puerto Rican return migrants. Population Studies Center Research Report, No. 91-226, Sep 1991. 30, [9] pp. University of Michigan, Population Studies Center: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
The author attempts to determine whether "return migrants to Puerto Rico can capitalize at home on the labor market experience accumulated in the U.S. The results show that the earnings of returnees do not increase with time spent in the U.S....The results are suggestive of negative selectivity of return migration to Puerto Rico."
Correspondence: University of Michigan, Population Studies Center, 1225 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1070. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40588 Findley, Sally E. Circulation as a drought-coping strategy in rural Mali. In: Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies, edited by Calvin Goldscheider. 1992. 61-89 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"Using...data from a longitudinal survey of migration in Mali's Senegal River Valley, this chapter presents data showing the extent to which circular migration was adopted as a strategy for coping with the drought of 1983-85. We first outline the circumstances under which families in this region might choose circular over permanent migration as part of their drought survival strategy. We then present data from the survey, documenting the rise in circulation during the drought and highlighting family and community factors which affect circulation and more permanent migration. The chapter concludes with some observations about how our models for development and drought-resistance could change to better accommodate the realities of circulation."
Correspondence: S. E. Findley, Columbia University, Center for Population and Family Health, 60 Haven Avenue, New York, NY 10027. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40589 Gui, Shixun; Sun, Jiaqi. A survey analysis of the status of influent reproductive age women in Shanghai--a survey report. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 3, No. 3, 1991. 193-203 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
Characteristics of the female transient population of reproductive age in Shanghai, China, are assessed using data from an October 1988 survey. "Not only did this survey supply large quantities of basic data on the floating population for the Shanghai government and related departments, but [it] was also very enlightening for our research into how to make a good job of family planning administration for China's urban-rural floating population."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40590 Lowell, B. Lindsay. Circular mobility, migrant communities, and policy restrictions: unauthorized flows from Mexico. In: Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies, edited by Calvin Goldscheider. 1992. 137-57 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
Patterns of illegal migration between Mexico and the United States are examined. "While many unauthorized migrants settle, this paper argues that a much larger component circulates repeatedly between the two nations and therefore it is useful to address migrant strategies within their historical, community, and geopolitical contexts....This paper first presents the rationale behind continuing high levels of circular migration patterns....Three major sources of data on Mexican migration are examined: legal flows, net-migration to the resident unauthorized stock, and apprehension data as a loose indicator of more circular flows. Finally, data from [the U.S. Immigration Reform and Control Act] legalization program are used to document the great variety of mobility patterns that exist across a range of unauthorized community types."
Correspondence: B. L. Lowell, U.S. Department of Labor, Division of Immigration Policy and Research, 200 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20210. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40591 Yang, Xiushi. Temporary migration and its frequency from urban households in China. Asia-Pacific Population Journal, Vol. 7, No. 1, Mar 1992. 27-50 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng.
"Using Zhejiang Province [China] as a case study, this article first relates temporary migrants to non-migrants at urban origins to determine the individual and household determinants of temporary migration from urban households. The analysis will then focus on temporary migrants themselves to investigate the relationship between individual/household characteristics and migration-related variables on one hand and the frequency of temporary migration on the other. The data used were collected in urban places." It is found that "most temporary migration from urban households in China is a result of business-related exchange of information, expertise and skills necessitated by economic development."
Correspondence: X. Yang, University of North Carolina, Carolina Population Center, University Square, Chapel Hill, NC 27516-3997. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.6. Rural-Urban Migration

Migration from rural to urban areas (the rural exodus), both internal and international. Reverse or turnaround migration is also included.

58:40592 Buckley, Cynthia J. Rural-urban migration in a centrally planned economy: the case of the Soviet Union. Pub. Order No. DA9208499. 1991. 258 pp. University Microfilms International: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
This study focuses on Soviet policies designed to affect internal migration. It was prepared as a doctoral dissertation at the University of Michigan.
Correspondence: University Microfilms International, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1346. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, A: Humanities and Social Sciences (52)10.

58:40593 Eaton, Peter J. Rural-urban migration and underemployment among females in the Brazilian Northeast. Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 26, No. 2, Jun 1992. 385-95 pp. Knoxville, Tennessee. In Eng.
The relationships among rural-urban migration, underemployment, and government policy are explored using data from two surveys on female migration to Fortaleza, Brazil. The results suggest that for this segment of the labor force, the unfavorable responses to government policy predicted by Michael Todaro and others do not occur.
Correspondence: P. J. Eaton, University of Missouri, Department of Economics, 5100 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:40594 Hugo, G. J.; Smailes, P. J. Population dynamics in rural South Australia. Journal of Rural Studies, Vol. 8, No. 1, Jan 1992. 29-51 pp. Tarrytown, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The authors examine recent trends in Australia in turnaround migration, or the movement of the population from urban to rural areas. "The paper assesses the major changes which have occurred in population trends within the non-metropolitan sector of the nation, South Australia and, in particular, a study area in the lower north region of South Australia. The analysis of the case study region draws upon a survey undertaken in 1968-1970 and partially replicated in 1980 and 1990. It appears that for Australia in general and for the study area the turnaround is continuing but at a slower pace and in a more spatially concentrated pattern."
Correspondence: G. J. Hugo, Flinders University of South Australia, Geography Discipline, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:40595 Kurkiewicz, Jolanta. Emigration selectivity measure. Studia Demograficzne, No. 3/105, 1991. 125-37 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Eng.
"In this paper...[Kendall's] association coefficient is proposed as a measure of emigration selectivity....This coefficient allows [one] not only to compare the level of emigration selectivity connected with selected features but also to evaluate which of these features incline population to stay in their environment. As an example the emigration from the rural areas in Poland in 1987 is considered. According to the results one can say that emigration selectivity coincides with the considered features (female sex and the 20-29 age). In the same manner the selectivity of immigration may be considered."
Correspondence: J. Kurkiewicz, Akademia Ekonomiczna w Krakowie, Rakowicka 27, 31-510 Krakow, Poland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40596 Ma, Rong. Town residents and rural-town migration in Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China. In: Migration, population structure, and redistribution policies, edited by Calvin Goldscheider. 1992. 91-116 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author examines the impact of rural-urban migration on the growth and economic development of towns in China. Data are from 1985 and 1987 migration surveys conducted in Inner Mongolia. The characteristics of town residents, their income, and travel experiences are analyzed and compared with those of the rural population.
Correspondence: R. Ma, Beijing University, Institute of Sociology, Hai Dian, Beijing 100871, China. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40597 Serow, William J. Recent trends and future prospects of urban-rural migration in Europe. Sociologia Ruralis, Vol. 31, No. 4, 1991. 269-80 pp. Assen, Netherlands. In Eng.
Recent trends in migration between urban and rural areas in Europe are examined, based on a review of the recent literature. The focus is on differences among countries and on the demographic, social, economic, and environmental factors that affect such migration. The importance of rural-urban migration for future changes in spatial distribution is explored.
Correspondence: W. J. Serow, Florida State University, Center for the Study of Population, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4063. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:40598 Wei, Jinsheng. Trends in population growth in China's towns during the eighties, and town population in-migration and its decisive factors: a historic convergence of two types of demographic change. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 2, No. 4, 1990. 317-29 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
Rural-urban migration trends during the 1980s in China are reviewed, with a focus on the effect of the agricultural land reforms of 1979 on such migration. Consideration is given to urban structural shifts and income changes during the period.
Correspondence: J. Wei, Beijing School of Economics, Population Research Institute, Beijing, China. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:40599 Yadava, Kedar N. S.; Singh, Shri K.; Kumar, U. Commutation and migration: patterns, expectancies and consequences. Genus, Vol. 47, No. 3-4, Jul-Dec 1991. 133-57 pp. Rome, Italy. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Ita.
"The main objective of this paper is to study the nature of daily rural-urban migration (commutation) and its role in development of rural households [in India]. The specific objectives of this article are divided into three parts. In the first section the pattern of commutation from rural households is discussed through a probability model whereas in the second section the mobility expectancy tables are computed based on the usual assumptions of a general life table plus the assumptions particular to migration and commutation. The third section deals with the comparative study of the impact of commutation and other types of movements on the development of rural households. The data for this study are taken from [a] three year prospective survey...[of] three different [types] of villages showing different phases of development."
Correspondence: K. N. S. Yadava, Banaras Hindu University, Department of Statistics, Varanasi 221 005, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


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