Volume 58 - Number 3 - Fall 1992

H. Migration

Studies that treat quantitative data on migration analytically. Methodological studies concerned primarily with migration are coded in this division and cross-referenced to N. Methods of Research and Analysis Including Models , as appropriate. Includes some consideration of policy aspects, but studies relating primarily to policies designed to affect migration are coded under M.3. Measures Affecting Migration .

H.1. General Migration

Studies that concern both international and internal migration.

58:30436 Body-Gendrot, Sophie. Tentative definitions regarding international comparisons. [Essai de definitions en matiere de comparaisons internationales.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 8, No. 1, 1992. 9-16 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
This is an introduction to a special issue devoted to the development of businesses by foreigners in France, Europe, and North America. The author discusses the difficulty of establishing what commonly used migration studies terms actually mean, particularly when making international comparisons.
Correspondence: S. Body-Gendrot, Universite Paris IV, 105 rue Didot, 75014 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30437 Brubaker, W. Rogers. Citizenship struggles in Soviet successor states. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 269-91 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"The breakup of the Soviet Union has transformed yesterday's internal migrants, secure in their Soviet citizenship, into today's international migrants of contested legitimacy and uncertain membership. This transformation has touched Russians in particular, of whom some 25 million live in non-Russian successor states. This article examines the politics of citizenship vis-a-vis Russian immigrants in the successor states, focusing on the Baltic states, where citizenship has been a matter of sustained and heated controversy." The author concludes that "formal citizenship cannot be divorced from broader questions of substantive belonging. Successor states' willingness to accept Russian immigrants as citizens, and immigrants' readiness to adopt a new state as their state, will depend on the terms of membership for national minorities and the organization of public life in the successor states." Data are from a variety of published sources.
Correspondence: W. R. Brubaker, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30438 Chant, Sylvia. Gender and migration in developing countries. ISBN 1-85293-186-8. 1992. xiii, 249 pp. Belhaven Press: London, England. In Eng.
"This book represents one of the first systematic attempts to explore the causes, nature and consequences of gender-selective population movement in a range of countries in the developing regions....Particular attention is paid to women's experiences as migrants and/or as members of households from which men migrate. Case studies by well-known researchers are drawn from Latin America (Peru, Costa Rica), the Caribbean (Montserrat), Africa (Ghana, Kenya), and Asia (Bangladesh, Thailand, Indonesia). These illustrate the diversity of gender-selective migration and at the same time highlight key similarities, in particular the constraints affecting the movement of low-income women. The findings are used to assess the relevance of current theoretical models and to suggest possible directions or future research and policy."
Correspondence: Belhaven Press, 25 Floral Street, London WC2E 9DS, England. Location: New York Public Library.

58:30439 Gauthier, Herve. The geographical mobility of Quebec's aged. [La mobilite geographique des personnes agees au Quebec.] Espace, Populations, Societes, No. 1, 1992. 59-70 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
"Information taken from censuses on previous residence (5 years before the census date) and on place of birth are used to give a general view of the geographic mobility of [the] elderly in Quebec (Canada). Many types of moves have to be considered: moves within the same municipality, migration [within] the same region, migration between provinces and immigration from outside Canada. Comparisons are made with the mobility of the population as a whole and with the mobility of Canadian elderly."
Correspondence: H. Gauthier, Bureau de la Statistique du Quebec, 117 rue Saint-Andre, Quebec, Quebec G1K 3Y3, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30440 Jones, Gavin W. The role of female migration in development. Working Papers in Demography, No. 33, 1992. 33 pp. Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Division of Demography and Sociology: Canberra, Australia. In Eng.
"This paper documents the patterns of female migration prevailing in different regions of the world and relates them to economic, social and cultural factors, and discusses the factors that would need to be included in a model of female role-related migration. The effect of female migration on female status and independence will depend very much on the context and form of the migration, and this is illustrated by case studies of female migration in different regions. The paper concludes with a discussion of development policies on female migration, stressing that unless development planners give specific attention to patterns of migration and gender differences in patterns and motivation for migration, they are likely to formulate policies which will exacerbate the problems of female migrants." The geographical focus is on developing countries.
Correspondence: Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Division of Demography and Sociology, P.O. Box 4, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30441 Morozova, G. F. The interdependence of migration and economic processes as a basis of migration policy. [Zavisimost' migratsionnykh i narodnokhozyaistvennykh protsessov kak osnova migratsionnoi politiki.] Sotsiologicheskie Issledovaniya, No. 10, 1991. 88-94 pp. Moscow, USSR. In Rus.
Recent trends in migration within and from the USSR following perestroika are analyzed. The author first notes the unpreparedness of the Soviet authorities facing these changes and the difficulties of developing policies designed to influence migration in times of economic and political change. New migration streams identified include a sharp increase of out-migration by Russians from the non-Russian republics in the Caucasus and Central Asia, migration from environmentally damaged areas, and increased emigration by Jews and Germans, including ethnically mixed families. The author predicts an increase in emigration from the USSR because of worsening economic conditions.
Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:30442 Rogers, A. Heterogeneity, spatial population dynamics, and the migration rate. Environment and Planning A, Vol. 24, No. 6, Jun 1992. 775-91 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"In this paper, I examine some of the ways in which widely used migration indices are affected by the impacts of heterogeneity and selection, which act within a multistate perspective of spatial population dynamics that permits increments as well as decrements in the selectivity (and return) process. As a result, several commonly used indices of migration introduce a specification bias into the analysis--a bias that reflects the relative weighting accorded to component migration rates by the initial population compositions and spatial distributions."
This paper was originally presented at the 1991 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America.
Correspondence: A. Rogers, University of Colorado, Institute of Behavioral Science, Population Program, Boulder, CO 80309-0484. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

58:30443 Rogers, Andrei. Heterogeneity, spatial population dynamics, and the migration rate. Population Program Working Paper, No. WP-91-1, Feb 1991. 45, [3] pp. University of Colorado, Institute of Behavioral Science, Population Program: Boulder, Colorado. In Eng.
"In this paper, we focus on the evolutionary dynamics of (multistate) multiregional populations whose interdependent subpopulations can experience increments as well as decrements. We show that the principal implication for migration analysis is that any migration rate depends on the relative weighting accorded to its component rates by the initial population's composition and spatial distribution....The paper also demonstrates that migration rates that are not true occurrence-exposure rates are especially ambiguous...." Data for India, the Soviet Union, and the United States provide empirical illustrations.
This paper was originally presented at the 1991 Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America.
Correspondence: University of Colorado, Institute of Behavioral Science, Population Program, Boulder, CO 80309. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30444 Rogers, Andrei. Indirect estimation of migration using birthplace-specific data on multiregional population distribution. Population Program Working Paper, No. WP-91-3, Jun 1991. 20 pp. University of Colorado, Institute of Behavioral Science, Population Program: Boulder, Colorado. In Eng.
The author assesses the use of models developed by Preston and Coale and by Kim for purposes of indirect estimation of migration. "This paper seeks to develop...an alternative...that requires three instead of two consecutive birthplace-specific multiregional age distributions." Projections are included for the United States population from 1980 to 2080.
For the article by S. H. Preston and A. J. Coale, see Population Index, Vol. 48, No. 2, 1982, pp. 217-59. For the article by Y. J. Kim, published in 1986, see 52:30806.
Correspondence: University of Colorado, Institute of Behavioral Science, Population Program, Boulder, CO 80309. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30445 Skeldon, Ronald. The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region. Population Research Leads, No. 38, 1991. 22 pp. U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]: Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng.
The effects of trends in migration and mobility on economic development in the countries of Asia and the Pacific are described. Consideration is given to internal and international migration, the impact of changes in mobility on the labor force and economic conditions, destination centers, and skilled labor migration. Some projections for future trends are included.
Correspondence: U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Population Division, Population Information Section, United Nations Building, Rajdamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30446 Societa Italiana di Demografia Storica [SIDES] (Bologna, Italy). International migration from the Middle Ages to the present day: the case of Italy. Proceedings of a seminar held in Rome at the Istituto Alcide Cervi, January 11-12, 1990. [Le migrazioni internazionali dal medioevo all'eta'contemporanea: il caso italiano. Atti del seminario di studi, Roma, Istituto Alcide Cervi, 11-12 gennaio 1990.] Bollettino di Demografia Storica, No. 12, 1990. 294 pp. Bologna, Italy. In Ita.
These are the proceedings of a seminar on migration in Italy. The volume, which consists of 20 papers by various authors, is divided into three sections. The first section looks at migration over time, the second at migration during specific periods of history, and the third at present-day migration. Both migrations among the states of pre-unification Italy and migration concerning Italy as a whole are included. The primary focus of the final section is on emigration from Italy to other parts of the world.
Correspondence: Societa Italiana di Demografia Storica, Dipartimento di Scienze Statistiche, Via Belle Arti 41, 40126 Bologna, Italy. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.2. International Migration

Studies concerned with international migration, including the brain drain.

58:30447 Abadan-Unat, Nermin. East-west vs. south-north migration: effects upon the recruitment areas of the 1960s. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 401-12 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This article is focused on Turkey and Turkish emigration abroad. It examines integration of second generation immigrants in Western Europe and various forces fostering Islamic identity. It then compares political discourse on immigration in France and Germany. It concludes that the resurgence of ethnic identity as the basis for effective political action in widely divergent societies is a key feature of the post-Cold War period."
Correspondence: N. Abadan-Unat, University of Ankara, Tandogan, Ankara, Turkey. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30448 Appleyard, R. T.; Nagayama, T.; Stahl, C. W. Conference on international manpower flows and foreign investment in the Asian region. International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales, Vol. 30, No. 1, Mar 1992. 57-80 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
This is a report from a conference held in Tokyo, Japan, in 1991 on the economic aspects of labor mobility in Asia. The authors briefly describe selected papers given at the conference and outline conference topics. A list of participants is included.
Correspondence: R. T. Appleyard, University of Western Australia, Department of Economics, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30449 Archdeacon, Thomas J. Reflections on immigration to Europe in light of U.S. immigration history. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 525-48 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
Trends in international migration in Europe and the United States are analyzed and compared, with a focus on concern about the presence of migrants in the receiving country. Consideration is given to the acculturation of migrants in the United States, including a historical outline of that process as it occurred during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Cultural pluralism and the newest wave of immigration are also described. Implications for European immigration are assessed.
Correspondence: T. J. Archdeacon, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30450 Amar, Marianne; Milza, Pierre. Immigration in France in the twentieth century. [L'immigration en France au XXe siecle.] ISBN 2-200-37190-X. 1990. 331 pp. Armand Colin: Paris, France. In Fre.
This work is presented in the form of a lexicon of terms concerning immigration issues in contemporary France. The objective is to provide the reader with information necessary for understanding the issues involved, which include the integration of migrants, citizenship, political refugees, and antagonism toward migrants. Brief descriptions of many immigrant groups are included.
Correspondence: Armand Colin Editeur, 103 Boulevard Saint-Michel, 75240 Paris Cedex 05, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30451 Arnold, Fred. The contribution of remittances to economic and social development. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 205-20 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This chapter explores both the causes and consequences of remittances in an international context characterized by growing interdependencies among countries....Although empirical studies linking remittances to other flows are rare, a strong case can be made that they are closely associated with flows of trade and capital and the future flow of international migrants."
Correspondence: F. Arnold, East-West Population Institute, 1777 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96848. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30452 Balan, Jorge. The role of migration policies and social networks in the development of a migration system in the Southern Cone. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 115-30 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This chapter has examined international migration in the Southern Cone [countries of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay], where flows of people and goods across international borders are facilitated by cultural, political, and geographical factors." The emphasis is on immigration to Argentina. "One possible conclusion of the analysis presented here is that the migration system arising from the joint operation of economic forces and social networks in a context of inconsistent and poorly enforced migration policies has defeated the explicit purposes of Argentine [migration] policy."
Correspondence: J. Balan, Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad, Pueyrredon 510, Piso 7, 1032 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30453 Barbero, Maria I.; Cacopardo, Maria C. European immigration to Argentina after World War II: old myths and new conditions. [La inmigracion europea a la Argentina en la segunda posguerra: viejos mitos y nuevas condiciones.] Estudios Migratorios Latinoamericanos, Vol. 6, No. 19, Dec 1991. 291-321 pp. Buenos Aires, Argentina. In Spa. with sum. in Eng.
European immigration to Argentina between 1945 and 1960 is examined. Migrant characteristics are studied, including age, sex, literacy, country of origin, and occupation. Special attention is given to occupational status to determine how well migrants assimilated into Argentinian life. A review of official migration policy for the period is included.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30454 Bedford, Richard. International migration in the South Pacific region. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 41-62 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
Trends in international migration among the countries of the South Pacific and between these countries and the rest of the world are examined, with a focus on the latter movements. After a historical overview, current determinants, including opportunities for education and employment, are discussed. The author concludes that "in the last decade of the twentieth century and in the next century, the South Pacific migration system is likely to be much more heavily influenced by proximity to Asia than by its links with a distant Europe, which have dominated transformations in society and economy since the late eighteenth century."
Correspondence: R. Bedford, University of Waikato, Department of Geography, Private Bag, Hamilton, New Zealand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30455 Birks, J. S.; Sinclair, C. A. Manpower and population evolution in the GCC and the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. World Employment Programme Research Working Paper, No. MIG WP.42, ISBN 92-2-107297-5. Oct 1989. iii, 34 pp. International Labour Office [ILO], International Migration for Employment Branch: Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng.
The authors "(a) provide their best estimate of the mid-1980s numbers of non-citizen workers in the member States of the Gulf Co-operation Council, (b) succinctly summarise the factors conditioning the volume and characteristics of the migrant workforce there, and (c) project the numbers of non-citizens in the GCC States up to the year 1995 in terms of both workers and the population at large." The projections do not take into account the Gulf war of 1991.
Correspondence: International Labour Office, 4 route des Morillons, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30456 Booth, Heather. The migration process in Britain and West Germany: two demographic studies of migrant populations. Research in Ethnic Relations, ISBN 1-85628-058-6. 1992. xx, 234 pp. Avebury: Brookfield, Vermont/Aldershot, England. In Eng.
"This book discusses, through two demographic case studies, the postwar migration of labour and its dependents to Western Europe, and the resulting development of ethnic minority populations within the European countries." Data are from official sources in Britain and Germany. The study shows that the same process occurs in both cases, starting with migration, continuing through a period in which the migrant minority population can be distinguished demographically from the host population, and concluding when past migration patterns no longer have any significant demographic effect.
Correspondence: Avebury Publishing, Gower House, Croft Road, Aldershot, Hants GU11 3HR, England. Location: New York Public Library.

58:30457 Borrie, W. D. The demographic consequences of international migration. ISBN 90-71093-10-7. 1992. 67 pp. Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study [NIAS]: Wassenaar, Netherlands. In Eng.
This is a summary report of a symposium on the demographic consequences of international migration, held in Wassenaar, Netherlands, on September 27-29, 1990. The focus of the meeting was on contemporary and future migration to Europe. The author concludes that Europe is poised to become the third major epicenter of immigration, following the examples of North America and Australia. A final section by D. J. van de Kaa discusses what European policymakers need to know about the demographic impact of immigration (pp. 59-67).
Correspondence: Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, Meijboomlaan 1, 2242 PR Wassenaar, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30458 Briggs, Vernon M. Immigration reform and the urban labor market: resolved and unresolved data issues. In: American Statistical Association, 1988 proceedings of the Social Statistics Section. 1988. 12-6 pp. American Statistical Association: Alexandria, Virginia. In Eng.
The author assesses the availability of data on immigration to the United States. He finds that it is inadequate for analysis or planning purposes and that recent reforms of immigration laws have not resulted in significant improvements. As a consequence, it is not possible to adequately evaluate the impact of immigration on urban labor markets.
Correspondence: V. M. Briggs, Cornell University, NYSSILR, 393 Ives Hall, Ithaca, NY 14851-0952. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30459 Canada. Quebec (Province). Ministere des Communautes Culturelles et de l'Immigration (Quebec, Canada). Proceedings of the Scientific Seminar on Current Migration Trends and the Integration of Migrants in Francophone Countries. [Actes du Seminaire Scientifique sur les Tendances Migratoires Actuelles et l'Insertion des Migrants dans les Pays de la Francophonie.] Les Publications du Quebec, ISBN 2-551-08404-0. 1989. viii, 409 pp. Quebec, Canada. In Fre.
These are the proceedings of a seminar held in Montreal, Canada, in 1986 on the integration of migrants in French-speaking countries. The first part contains papers describing current immigration trends in the French-speaking countries of Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Northern Africa and the Middle East, the Caribbean, and Canada and Quebec. The second part includes papers describing the process of migrant absorption in those same countries and regions.
Correspondence: Les Publications du Quebec, 1279 boulevard Charest Ouest, Quebec, Quebec G1N 4K7, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30460 Castles, Stephen. The Australian model of immigration and multiculturalism: is it applicable to Europe? International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 549-67 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"The aim of this article is to examine the experience of Australia with regard to immigration and ethnic diversity since 1945, and to discuss the relevance of this experience for Western Europe." The author finds that "since 1945, over 5 million settlers have come from many different countries, leading to a situation of great cultural diversity....Over the last twenty years, a policy of multiculturalism has emerged, giving rise to several special institutions. This has had profound effects both on social policy and on concepts of national identity. The relevance of the Australian model for Western Europe is discussed."
Correspondence: S. Castles, University of Wollongong, P.O. Box 1144, Wollongong, NSW 2500, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30461 Cecil, R. G.; Ebanks, G. E. The Caribbean migrant farm worker programme in Ontario: seasonal expansion of West Indian economic spaces. International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales, Vol. 30, No. 1, Mar 1992. 19-37 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
The authors describe a program sponsored by farmers in Canada to import seasonal agricultural workers to Ontario from the Caribbean and Mexico. "On the basis of survey data obtained in 1987, this paper focuses primarily on levels of earnings and characteristics of individual participants. Some comparisons are also made between the Ontario programme and one in Florida which also involved temporary West Indian labour."
Correspondence: R. G. Cecil, University of Western Ontario, Department of Geography, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30462 Center for Migration Studies (Staten Island, New York). The new Europe and international migration. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 229-684 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This special issue of the International Migration Review dedicated primarily to migratory movements from Eastern Europe to Western Europe is based on a comprehensive selection of research papers presented at the conference 'The New Europe and International Migration' held in Turin, Italy, November, 1991." Comparisons are also made with migrant experiences from the United States and Australia.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Center for Migration Studies, 209 Flagg Place, Staten Island, NY 10304-1199. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30463 Coates, Joseph F. Immigration: then, now, and in the future. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Vol. 39, No. 4, Jul 1991. 411-5 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
The author examines recent changes in immigration flows to the United States. Consideration is given to the increase in Caribbean, Chinese, Indian, and Muslim immigration, which he attributes to today's lower costs of air travel. The negative impact of the ability to return home easily and cheaply on migrants' desire to fully acculturate into U.S. society is noted. Mention is made of the need for new international migration policies to meet the needs of guest workers and consultants.
Correspondence: J. F. Coates, J. F. Coates, Inc., 3738 Kanawha Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20015. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

58:30464 Cohn, Raymond L. The occupations of English immigrants to the United States, 1836-1853. Journal of Economic History, Vol. 52, No. 2, Jun 1992. 377-87 pp. New York, New York/Cambridge, England. In Eng.
"This article examines the recent view that economic distress was not an important cause of English immigration [to the United States] before 1860. Demographic information is used to show that characteristics of males on suspect passenger [ship] lists (those that listed only laborers) matched those of laborers on other lists. Based on this result and other information, laborers appear to be the dominant group of immigrants. Support is thus provided for the view that distress was the most important cause of immigration, even though many other immigrants were not fleeing economic distress."
Correspondence: R. L. Cohn, Illinois State University, Department of Economics, Normal, IL 61761. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:30465 Coleman, David A. Does Europe need immigrants? Population and work force projections. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 413-61 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
The author critically analyzes the argument that Western Europe needs migrants to restore its age structure and labor force. He examines factors including the structure of the population, population and work force projections, and current and future immigration patterns. It is concluded that "increased immigration is not needed to satisfy quantitative work force deficiencies at least for the next ten or twenty years in Western Europe or the [European Community] in general....Instead, in the long run, the greatest challenge facing Europe's policymakers is to devise ways in which conditions of employment and welfare support can help to make life sufficiently tolerable for the women of Europe; that they can contemplate raising the families upon which Europe's future depends while also exercising their wish to work."
Correspondence: D. A. Coleman, Oxford University, Wellington Square, Oxford 0X1 2JD, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30466 D'Innocenzo, Michael; Sirefman, Josef P. Immigration and ethnicity. American society--"melting pot" or "salad bowl"? Contributions in Sociology, No. 97, ISBN 0-313-27759-1. LC 91-6281. 1992. 344 pp. Greenwood Press: Westport, Connecticut/London, England. In Eng.
This is a selection of 23 papers by various authors on aspects of immigration to the United States. A common theme is the extent to which immigrant groups have become absorbed into the American mainstream and the extent to which they have preserved their ethnic individualities.
Correspondence: Greenwood Press, 88 Post Road West, Box 5007, Westport, CT 06881. Location: New York Public Library.

58:30467 Daboussi, Raouf. Economic evolution, demographic trends, employment and migration movements. ISBN 92-2-107904-X. Feb 1991. vi, 29 pp. International Labour Office [ILO], International Migration for Employment Branch: Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng.
This document summarizes reports drawn up by the 10 member states of the Mediterranean Information Exchange System on International Migration and Employment (MIES). It describes trends during the 1980s in the region in economic development, population dynamics, employment, and migration. The report concludes that two clear groups of countries exist: one group of developed countries with slow rates of population growth and an increasing need for human resources, and another group with rapid population growth and limited economic opportunities. The impact of this division on migration pressures is assessed.
Correspondence: International Labour Office, 4 route des Morillons, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30468 Dawkins, Peter; Lewis, Philip; Norris, Keith; Baker, Meredith; Robertson, Frances; Groenewold, Nicolaas; Hagger, Alfred. Flows of immigrants to South Australia, Tasmania and Western Australia. ISBN 0-644-1480-9. 1991. xv, 115 pp. Bureau of Immigration Research: South Carlton, Australia. Distributed by International Specialized Book Services, 5602 N.E. Hassalo Street, Portland, OR 97213. In Eng.
Reasons why certain regions of Australia, such as South Australia and Tasmania, receive a disproportionately small share of immigrant arrivals are explored. Comparisons are made with trends in Western Australia. The authors identify policies that might influence the geographic distribution of immigrants. The study examines the patterns of interstate migration and migrant characteristics.
Correspondence: Bureau of Immigration Research, P.O. Box 659, South Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia. Location: East-West Population Institute, Honolulu, HI.

58:30469 Eelens, F.; Schampers, T.; Speckmann, J. D. Labour migration to the Middle East: from Sri Lanka to the Gulf. ISBN 0-7103-0426-9. LC 90-25157. 1992. xi, 259 pp. Kegan Paul International: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
This is a collection of articles by various authors on the socioeconomic and demographic factors affecting labor migration trends from Sri Lanka to the countries of the Middle East. "The book [first]...presents the concept of survival migration, which is considered a main characteristic of the Sri Lankan case. The work goes on to describe the recruiting process and the level of fees which migrants have to pay for a job abroad; the policy of the Gulf States with regard to labour migration; the socio-economic conditions of the Sri Lankan migrant workers; the socio-economic position and religious status of Sri Lankan Muslim [migrant] women...; the impact of labour migration on Sri Lankan society--specifically on social stratification, social mobility, household structure, marriage stability and the well-being of children--and conditions which lead to the early return of migrants."
Correspondence: Kegan Paul International, P.O. Box 256, London WC1B 3SW, England. Location: New York Public Library.

58:30470 Fargues, Philippe. Does international migration follow the oil market situation in the Gulf? The case of Kuwait. Population Bulletin of ESCWA, No. 33, Dec 1988. 33-56 pp. Baghdad, Iraq. In Eng.
The author examines the impact of oil-price fluctuations on labor migration flows for Kuwait. The emphasis is on the effects of the early-1980s price drop. "After reviewing these flows...this paper will attempt to answer two main questions: (a) Do immigrants tend to remain where they are and become part of the Kuwait of tomorrow, or is return migration likely to be massive? (b) If there is a tendency to remain in Kuwait, is this accompanied by a move towards the integration of foreigners into a new society, or, on the contrary, is the 'separate development' of two distinct societies taking place?"
Correspondence: P. Fargues, Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30471 Fassmann, Heinz; Munz, Rainer. Demographic and social consequences of east-west migration--examples from Austria, conclusions for Western Europe. [Demographische und soziale Konsequenzen der Ost-West-Wanderung--Beispiele aus Osterreich, Folgerungen fur Westeuropa.] Zeitschrift fur Bevolkerungswissenschaft, Vol. 17, No. 4, 1991. 379-93 pp. Wiesbaden, Germany. In Ger. with sum. in Eng; Fre.
Trends in international migration from Eastern to Western Europe are projected to the year 2031, with a focus on the consequences for Austria. Consideration is given to migrants' impact on demographic aging, the labor force, and the housing market.
Correspondence: H. Fassmann, Institut fur Stadt- und Regionalforschung, Postgasse 2, A-1010 Vienna, Austria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30472 Foster, William; Baker, Lyle. Immigration and the Australian economy. ISBN 0-644-14786-5. 1991. xvi, 151 pp. Bureau of Immigration Research: South Carlton, Australia. Distributed by International Specialized Book Services, 5602 N.E. Hassalo Street, Portland, OR 97213. In Eng.
The impact of immigration on the Australian economy is assessed using data from the Bureau of Immigration Research and a review of the published literature. Topics covered include domestic demand and supply, productivity effects, aggregate effects, short-term stabilization, distributional effects, and policy implications. The authors conclude that the main long-term impact of immigration has been to contribute about 40 percent of Australia's postwar population growth, which in turn has affected the rate of economic growth and the size of the economy. They conclude that "the short-term economic impact of varying immigration is negligible, and no significant link has been established between immigration and issues such as aggregate income inequality, the effectiveness of the domestic source of skills, progress in industry restructuring, and environment and urban infrastructure problems."
Correspondence: Bureau of Immigration Research, P.O. Box 659, South Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia. Location: East-West Population Institute, Honolulu, HI.

58:30473 Garson, Jean-Pierre. Migration and interdependence: the migration system between France and Africa. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 80-93 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This chapter, by focusing on the ties that linked France with her former colonies in Africa, both before and after their independence, analyses how the migration system that emerged constitutes an integral part of a generalized system of bilateral relations." After a brief historical review of migration trends between the two, consideration is given to the settlement and growth of the African population in France and to attempts to regulate migratory flows.
Correspondence: J.-P. Garson, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Manpower Policy Division, 2 rue Andre Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30474 Gibson, Campbell. The contribution of immigration to the growth and ethnic diversity of the American population. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, Vol. 136, No. 2, Jun 1992. 157-75 pp. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In Eng.
"The first purpose of this paper is to present estimates of the contribution of immigration to American population growth. The focus is on the two centuries covered by the decennial censuses of population for the United States (1790-1990); however, some rough estimates are noted for the period preceding national censuses. The second purpose is to provide a general indication of the contribution of immigration to changes in the ethnic composition of the American population."
Correspondence: C. Gibson, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Population Division, Suitland, MD 20233. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:30475 Gurak, Douglas T.; Caces, Fe. Migration networks and the shaping of migration systems. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 150-76 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This chapter reviews research on the functioning of migrant networks and identifies analytic issues that require focused attention in order to specify the impact of migrant networks on migration systems. Two sets of literature are used. The first consists of work conducted on migration networks...that raises questions and calls for specification of the range of mechanisms through which networks influence both the shape and magnitude of migration flows, and the nature of evolution of both the origin and destination communities....The second body of literature consists of work on social networks from contexts other than migration." The geographical scope is worldwide.
Correspondence: D. T. Gurak, Cornell University, Population and Development Program, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30476 Heisler, Barbara S. The future of immigrant incorporation: Which models? Which concepts? International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 623-45 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"The paper examines the usefulness of various theoretical approaches for understanding the causes and consequences of international migration in the 1990s. Extant ideas are considered in three periods, each with its own characteristic approach: the classical, represented by push and pull and assimilation perspectives; the modern, reflecting neo-Marxist and structured inequality perspectives; and emerging patterns in the literature, focusing on multiculturalism, social movements and citizenship." The geographical focus is on Europe and the United States.
Correspondence: B. S. Heisler, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA 17325. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30477 Heisler, Martin O. Migration, international relations and the new Europe: theoretical perspectives from institutional political sociology. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 596-622 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
The author examines the sociopolitical effects of recent political transformations in Eastern and Central Europe and the formation of the European Community on migration and international relations. Some policy implications are discussed.
Correspondence: M. O. Heisler, University of Maryland, 3300 Metzerott Road, Adelphi, MD 20783. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30478 Heitman, Sidney. Soviet emigration in 1990. Berichte des Bundesinstituts fur Ostwissenschaftliche und Internationale Studien, No. 33-1991, 1991. iii, 45 pp. Cologne, Germany. In Eng. with sum. in Ger.
"This report...[examines] the changes in Soviet emigration during 1990 and their significance for the emigrants, the USSR, and the West....The discussion is organized into five sections dealing with the background of Soviet emigration [1948-1990]; the changes in the movement during 1990; the status of the new draft law on emigration; the consequences and implications of the changes; and new developments between the end of 1990 and the time of writing in February 1991." Changes in Soviet policy and practice over time are considered. Migration data are provided for destination countries and for ethnic and religious groups, including Soviet Jews.
Correspondence: Bundesinstitut fur Ostwissenschaftliche und Internationale Studien, Lendenbornstrasse 22, D-5000 Cologne 30, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30479 Hintjens, H. M. Immigration and citizenship debates: reflections of ten common themes. International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales, Vol. 30, No. 1, Mar 1992. 5-17 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"This article begins with the view that access to citizenship and to citizenship rights has become the principal object of struggle between immigrants and the rest of society in Western Europe....In examining ten recurring themes of current debates on immigration and citizenship, the author hopes to summarise and critically examine the main arguments. The article also tries to show that arguments against the extension of rights to immigrants generally give priority to collective rather than individual rights. In this way, human rights violations towards immigrants are sanctioned (and sometimes even recommended) by socialist and conservative writers alike....This article concentrates on themes relating to the acquisition of citizenship in the metropolitan state by immigrants from the former colonies."
Correspondence: H. M. Hintjens, University of Exeter, Department of Politics, Exeter EX4 4QJ, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30480 Hollifield, James F. Migration and international relations: cooperation and control in the European Community. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 568-95 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"In this article I have developed a political-economic framework for understanding international migration in postwar Europe and the United States." The author begins by reviewing four theories of international relations and gives a short critique of their main assumptions. He "finds that international migration reveals a contradiction between the main economic purpose of the postwar international order--to promote exchange--and the national perquisites of sovereignty and citizenship."
Correspondence: J. F. Hollifield, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30481 Honekopp, Elmar. East-west migration: causes and trends. Federal Republic of Germany and Austria. [Ost-West-Wanderungen: Ursachen und Entwicklungstendenzen. Bundesrepublik Deutschland und Osterreich.] Mitteilungen aus der Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung, Vol. 24, No. 1, 1991. 115-33 pp. Stuttgart, Germany. In Ger.
Current trends in the volume and structure of migration from Eastern Europe to Germany and Austria are examined in light of recent political changes. The employment of foreigners is analyzed, causes of migration in the countries of origin and destination are discussed, and future prospects are outlined.
Location: World Bank, Joint Bank-Fund Library, Washington, D.C.

58:30482 Kandil, M.; Metwally, M. Determinants of the Egyptian labour migration. International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales, Vol. 30, No. 1, Mar 1992. 39-56 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"This paper will begin by summarizing some figures concerning magnitudes of recent Egyptian labour migration and then proceed to review some of the...important determinants of labour mobility....We then proceed with the empirical investigation in two stages. In stage one, we estimate a model of the migration rate from Egypt to a group of major Arab oil-producing countries (AOPC). In stage two, we consider the robustness of our findings by estimating the model using the migration rate from Egypt to Saudi Arabia, a major destination. The results [indicate that]...an increase in income in the destination countries relative to its counterpart in Egypt has a significant positive impact on the migration rate from Egypt to these countries."
Correspondence: M. Kandil, Southern Illinois University, Department of Economics, Carbondale, IL 62901. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30483 Khan, Azfar F. International migration and the "moral" economy of the "Barani" peasantry. Pakistan Development Review, Vol. 30, No. 4, Pt. 2, Winter 1991. 1,087-102 pp. Islamabad, Pakistan. In Eng.
The author examines "the out-migrations from 'barani' areas [rain-fed agricultural areas in northern Pakistan]...and specifically the recent movements to the oil-producing economies...with a view to assessing their ability to nurture a structural transformation in the sending areas. In so doing this paper will attempt to illustrate the attributes of the subsistence ethic in the 'barani' lands....It argues that there is an overriding logic behind the disparate economic actions of the 'barani' dwellers which goes beyond 'material' concerns." Comments by Zafar Mahmood are included (pp. 1,101-2).
Correspondence: A. F. Khan, Institute of Social Studies, P.O. Box 90733, 2509 LS The Hague, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30484 Korcelli, Piotr. International migrations in Europe: Polish perspectives for the 1990s. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 292-304 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This article presents estimates of the size of emigration from Poland during the 1980s as well as projections concerning the migration patterns in the 1990s. The author anticipates a contraction of the volume of population outflow by some 50 percent: from about 100,000 to about 50,000 per year, on the average. These projections are based upon the examination of the role of a number of incentives and barriers to migration, including economic, demographic and political factors. In the final section, prospects concerning immigration to Poland are briefly discussed."
Correspondence: P. Korcelli, Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, 00-927 Warsaw, Poland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30485 Kritz, Mary M.; Zlotnik, Hania. Global interactions: migration systems, processes, and policies. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 1-16 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The authors use examples from the other 17 chapters in this book to help describe the key elements of a systems approach to the study of international migration. They conclude that "in an increasingly interconnected world, few countries can be simply categorized as 'receivers' or 'senders' of migrants, and only the adoption of a wide perspective with regard to migration can advance our understanding about the coexistence of inflows and outflows of migrants from the same country or of the simultaneous admission of highly skilled workers and low-skilled ones by another." The geographical scope is worldwide.
Correspondence: M. M. Kritz, Cornell University, Population and Development Program, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30486 Kritz, Mary M.; Lim, Lin Lean; Zlotnik, Hania. International migration systems: a global approach. International Studies in Demography, ISBN 0-19-828356-3. LC 91-19315. 1992. xii, 354 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
This volume contains a selection of 18 papers, 15 of which were presented at a seminar entitled International Migration Systems, Processes, and Policies. The seminar, which was held in Genting Highlands, Malaysia, in September 1988, was organized by the IUSSP's Committee on International Migration in collaboration with the University of Malaya. "Through the analysis of specific migration systems, the study of processes that link countries of origin and destination, and the consideration of policy issues that underlie international migration, this volume contributes to an understanding of how international migration is changing in today's world and why it is important to look jointly at sending and receiving countries and comparatively across migration systems."
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Oxford University Press, Walton Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30487 Le Moigne, Guy. Immigration in France. [L'immigration en France.] Que Sais-Je?, 2nd ed. No. 2561, ISBN 2-13-043538-6. 1991. 127 pp. Presses Universitaires de France: Paris, France. In Fre.
This is a revised and updated edition of a work originally published in 1986. It provides information on recent immigration to France, including number and characteristics of migrants, their status, and migration policies.
For the previous edition, published in 1986, see 55:40454.
Correspondence: Presses Universitaires de France, 108 boulevard Saint-Germain, 75006 Paris, France. Location: Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, Paris, France.

58:30488 Louviot, Isabelle. Migration: east-west, south-north. [Migrations est ouest, sud nord.] Collection Enjeux, ISBN 2-218-04345-9. Aug 1991. 80 pp. Hatier: Paris, France. In Fre.
This is a general review of global trends in international migration. Two main streams of contemporary migration are identified: from eastern to western Europe, and from developing to developed countries. The economic aspects of migration in receiving countries are reviewed, and the policy aspects for Western Europe are discussed.
Correspondence: Libraire A. Hatier, 8 rue d'Assas, 75278 Paris Cedex 06, France. Location: Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, Paris, France.

58:30489 Mahmood, Zafar. Emigration and wages in an open economy: some evidence from Pakistan. Pakistan Development Review, Vol. 30, No. 3, Autumn 1991. 243-62 pp. Islamabad, Pakistan. In Eng.
"This paper examines the impact of labour emigration on the wages of both the skilled and unskilled workers....Using...Pakistani data, it is found that unskilled labour is used extremely intensively in the agriculture sector (exportable), skilled labour is used extremely intensively in the manufacturing sector (importable), and capital is used as the middle factor in both the traded goods sectors. Moreover, capital is used significantly less intensively in the construction (non-traded) sector relative to both the traded sectors....The results suggest that the higher wages to both the skilled and unskilled workers must be compensated by a reduction in the rate of returns to capital if export-oriented and import-competing sectors in Pakistan are to remain internationally competitive."
Correspondence: Z. Mahmood, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, P.O. Box 1091, Islamabad 44000, Pakistan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30490 Makinwa-Adebusoye, Paulina. The West African migration system. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 63-79 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This chapter examines the West African migration system as it has evolved in response to the changing political, economic, and social fortunes of the region." Following a brief historical overview, the author assesses the impact of individual country independence, migration policies, and geography on overall migratory trends within the region.
Correspondence: P. Makinwa-Adebusoye, Nigerian Institute of Social and Economic Research, Population Division, PMB 5, University Post Office, Ibadan, Nigeria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30491 McNicoll, Geoffrey. The economics of Australian immigration, with reference to trans-Tasman flows. Working Papers in Demography, No. 34, 1992. 28 pp. Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Division of Demography and Sociology: Canberra, Australia. In Eng.
"Migration from New Zealand to Australia is a substantial component of Australia's overall immigration--making up nearly a fifth of the net migration gain in recent years--but in many respects it is a movement more akin to domestic resettlement. The economics of trans-Tasman migration is discussed from both these standpoints....The first part [of this essay] is a comment on the economics-of-immigration debate in Australia--a debate within which trans-Tasman migration issues play markedly little part. The second is a consideration of trans-Tasman migration from the standpoint of an increasingly integrated Tasman economy, one that is approaching a condition of free trade and free factor mobility but where the two countries separately are also opening their domestic markets to the rest of the world."
Correspondence: Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Division of Demography and Sociology, P.O. Box 4, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30492 Miller, Mark J. Evolution of policy modes for regulating international labour migration. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 300-14 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The importance of international migration in the study of international relations and politics is described. The author finds that "the study of international migration phenomena, itself a dynamic exchange among nation states, can be furthered by exploring how migration relates to international relations considerations, as well as to other linkages and exchanges within sets of nation states." The geographical scope is worldwide.
Correspondence: M. J. Miller, University of Delaware, Department of Political Science, Newark, DE 19716. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30493 Ndongko, Wilfred A. Labour migration and regional economic co-operation and integration in Africa. Labour and Society, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1991. 231-49 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng.
The author examines the experience of various economic groupings of African countries with regard to unrestricted migration among member countries. After an introduction, section II "examines the nature of labour mobility (migration) during the colonial period. Section III is devoted to an analysis of the provisions for free labour movement/mobility within some African regional economic groupings. The nature and pattern of labour migration is looked at in section IV. In section V, the effects or impact of labour migration on national and regional economies are examined. Section VI attempts an analysis of the socio-economic problems which arise from labour mobility. In section VII, some substantial issues are examined. The final section attempts to formulate some policy recommendations."
Correspondence: W. A. Ndongko, ASEAC, Institut des Sciences Humaines, Yaounde, Cameroon. Location: Princeton University Library (IR).

58:30494 O'Brien, Peter. German-Polish migration: the elusive search for a German nation-state. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 373-87 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This article examines past and present migrations to Germany from the perspective of nation-state formation....Focusing on the many experiences with the Polish minority (ranging from the eighteenth century to the present), this essay suggests that Germans have never discovered an acceptable and workable approach for dealing with large non-German minorities in the German nation-state. Rather, different regimes at different times have vacillated between an exclusive approach founded on nationalist principles and practices and an inclusive one founded on liberal principles and practices....The confusion over the two approaches produces not only a confused immigration policy, but also reflects deep-seated confusion over the definition of the new German state and identity of the newly united German nation."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30495 Okolski, Marek. Migration from Central and Eastern Europe. [Mouvements migratoires en provenance des pays d'Europe centrale et orientale.] 1991. 52 pp. Council of Europe: Strasbourg, France. In Fre.
This study was presented as a paper at a ministerial-level conference held in Vienna, Austria, on January 24-25, 1991, to discuss migration from Central and Eastern Europe to Western Europe. The author reviews recent trends and the current situation, with particular attention given to Poland. He then examines the causes and consequences of these migrations and the factors that will govern them in the near future.
Correspondence: Council of Europe, Publications and Documents Division, F-67006 Strasbourg Cedex, France. Location: Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, Paris, France.

58:30496 Pasquini, Lucia. Immigration from non-E.C. countries into Emilia-Romagna: a case study. In: Essays on population economics in memory of Alfred Sauvy, edited by Giuseppe Gaburro and Dudley L. Poston. 1991. 185-209 pp. Casa Editrice Dott. Antonio Milani [CEDAM]: Padua, Italy. In Eng.
The author examines immigration from non-European Community countries into a region of Italy, using data from household composition certificates and a 1987 survey of 471 migrants. Consideration is given to migrants' age and marital status, employment, language skills, and household composition.
Correspondence: L. Pasquini, Universita degli Studi, Department of Statistical Sciences Paolo Fortunati, Via Zamboni 33, 40126 Bologna, Italy. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30497 Pflaumer, Peter. Demographic consequences of guestworker migration. In: American Statistical Association, 1991 proceedings of the Social Statistics Section. [1991]. 425-30 pp. American Statistical Association: Alexandria, Virginia. In Eng.
"The objective of this paper is to examine the effect of guestworker migration on the size and the age structure of the population of West Germany by applying population projection models. Population pyramids and age composition measurements will be used in order to characterize the resulting age structures. Different assumptions about the size and age composition of the migrant population will be made."
Correspondence: P. Pflaumer, Universitat Konstanz, SFB 178, Postfach 5560, D-7750 Constance, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30498 Salt, John. Migration processes among the highly skilled in Europe. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 484-505 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This article seeks to show that the migration process for highly skilled workers in contemporary Europe is part of the structuring of European business. It focuses on the employer's perspective and role in articulating movement, using data from various official sources as well as survey evidence from the United Kingdom. It suggests that the increasing importance of this form of mobility is related to the process of internationalization by large employers and that the particular form of movement is dependent on the evolution of corporate business."
Correspondence: J. Salt, University College, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30499 Sansone, Livio. Labor force mobility in an area of periphery: three cases from the Caribbean. [La circolazione delle persone in un'area della periferia: tre casi nei Caraibi.] Studi Emigrazione/Etudes Migrations, Vol. 29, No. 105, Mar 1992. 134-48 pp. Rome, Italy. In Ita. with sum. in Eng; Fre.
"This article deals tentatively with the issue of [labor] migration within an area of the periphery, the Caribbean. Over approximately the last century migration within this area has coexisted with emigration towards North America and the former 'mother countries' in Europe. The focus is on three specific cases: Aruba in the Dutch Antilles, Suriname (former Dutch Guyana) and the island of Hispaniola ([Dominican Republic] and Haiti). These three cases bear evidence to a number of developments in legal and illegal migration today."
Correspondence: L. Sansone, University of Amsterdam, Centre of Sociological-Anthropological Studies, 1011 NH Amsterdam, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30500 Schmertmann, Carl P. Immigrants' ages and the structure of stationary populations with below-replacement fertility. Center for the Study of Population Working Paper, No. WPS 92-96, [1992]. 29, [6] pp. Florida State University, College of Social Sciences, Center for the Study of Population: Tallahassee, Florida. In Eng.
"I construct examples of the long run effects of immigration on age structure in populations with low (U.S.) or very low (West German) fertility. This analysis allows examination of the sensitivity of long-run age structure to various assumptions regarding immigrants' ages and their fertility."
Correspondence: Robert H. Weller, Editor, Working Paper Series, Florida State University, Center for the Study of Population, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4063. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30501 Shamshur, Oleg V. Ukraine in the context of new European migrations. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 258-68 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
The author examines changes in migration from the Ukraine, with a focus on recent trends. He concludes that "like other Soviet successor states, the Ukraine is faced by multiple international migration-related dilemmas and opportunities. However, apocalyptic predictions forecasting mass emigration appear unwarranted."
Correspondence: O. V. Shamshur, Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Institute of World Economy and International Affairs, Ul. Vladimirskaya 54, 252601 Kiev, Ukraine. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30502 Shevtsova, Lilia. Post-Soviet emigration today and tomorrow. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 241-57 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
Trends in migration from the former Soviet Union are examined in light of recent political changes there. The author projects that "the number of departures may go up to 1-1.5 million people a year. This may happen if the present unfavorable socioeconomic conditions and instability continue to exist and if technical problems related to exit arrangements are solved. Once the situation normalizes first and foremost in Russia, the scope of emigration may be maintained at a level of 500,000 to 600,000 people per annum within the next two or three years and then begin to decline."
Correspondence: L. Shevtsova, USSR Academy of Sciences, Leninskii Pr. 14, 117901 Moscow, Russia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30503 Simmons, Alan B.; Guengant, Jean P. Caribbean exodus and the world system. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 94-114 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
A historical overview of migratory patterns is presented for the Caribbean as a whole, beginning with the importation of slaves in the seventeenth century. "The...review suggests a number of specific hypotheses for interpreting the historical, structural, and cultural roots of the recent and continuing exodus from the Caribbean. The forces involved in the Caribbean migration system may be classified by: (1) the historical period in which they emerged; (2) the extent to which they concern jobs, wages, and other market forces as opposed to cultural and ideological factors; and (3) their location: do they respond mainly to push factors in the Caribbean or to pull factors abroad? Some major elements in such a schema and how they vary across four historical periods are outlined...."
Correspondence: A. B. Simmons, York University, Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean, 4700 Keele Street, North York, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30504 Singhanetra-Renard, Anchalee. The mobilization of labour migrants in Thailand: personal links and facilitating networks. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 190-204 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This study shows the importance [in Thailand] of informal links in migration, confirming findings from other places in South-East Asia and from other regions. These informal links facilitate labour movements and expand the functions and forms of social networks over time. The analysis indicates that the same decision-making process and types of network are involved in Thai internal and international labour mobility....In South-East Asia, as in other parts of the world, neither receiving nor sending nation states appear able to stop networks of families, agents, syndicates, and employers from mobilizing and sustaining illegal international labour flows."
Correspondence: A. Singhanetra-Renard, Chiang Mai University, Department of Geography, 130 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50002, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30505 Stanfield, Rochelle L. Melting pot economics. National Journal, Vol. 24, No. 8, Feb 22, 1992. 442-6 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The author examines the economic costs and benefits of immigration to the United States. She notes that "with immigration on the rise and state budget balances in decline, generous federal policies for admitting refugees and other foreigners are being questioned. [She also notes that] the economic costs and benefits of immigrants are far from easy to sort out."
Location: Princeton University Library (SF).

58:30506 Stoyanova-Boneva, Bonka. Bulgarian immigration to the United States--a brief historical review. [Balgarskata imigratsiya v SASt--kratak istoricheski pregled.] Naselenie, No. 2, 1992. 22-30 pp. Sofia, Bulgaria. In Bul. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
The author analyzes migration to the United States from Bulgaria from the turn of the century to the present. The regional distribution of Bulgarians among the U.S. population is also discussed. Data are from published U.S. sources.
Correspondence: B. Stoyanova-Boneva, Balgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Institut po Sotsiologiya, ul. Akad. G. Bonchev bl. 6, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30507 Straubhaar, Thomas. Allocational and distributional aspects of future immigration to Western Europe. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 462-83 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This article shows that an analysis of the impacts of immigration [in Western Europe] has to be divided into allocational and distributional aspects. From an allocational point of view, like free trade in goods, services and capital, migration is welfare-improving as long as marginal productivities of labor are not equalized worldwide. From a distributional point of view, however, the immigration society has to bear the effects of sharing its common public goods and its social values with the new immigrants. Free immigration will only be allowed if the allocational welfare gains exceed the distributional welfare losses. According to this rule of thumb, a guideline for an efficient migration policy is sketched."
Correspondence: T. Straubhaar, Universitat der Bundeswehr Hamburg, Holstenhofweg 85, D-2000 Hamburg 70, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30508 Szoke, Laszlo. Hungarian perspectives on emigration and immigration in the new European architecture. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 305-23 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
After a brief review of Hungary's history as a receiving country, the author assesses projected changes in Hungarian migration policy designed to prevent a massive new influx of refugees and other migrants from eastern and central Europe.
Correspondence: L. Szoke, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Budapest, Hungary. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30509 Treibel, Annette. Migration in modern societies: social consequences of immigration and foreign labor. [Migration in modernen Gesellschaften: soziale Folgen von Einwanderung und Gastarbeit.] Grundlagentexte Soziologie, ISBN 3-7799-0385-7. 1990. 200 pp. Juventa: Weinheim, Germany. In Ger.
The social consequences of international labor force migration and immigration are examined, with a geographical focus on West Germany and the United States. Concepts of ethnic identity, interethnic relations, and the assimilation or marginalization of immigrant workers are discussed.
Correspondence: Juventa Verlag, Ehretstrasse 3, 6940 Weinheim, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30510 Tribalat, Michele. Immigration chronicle. [Chronique de l'immigration.] Population, Vol. 47, No. 1, Jan-Feb 1992. 153-90 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
Trends in the settlement of immigrants in France in the 1990s are examined and compared with patterns during the 1980s using 1990 census data and data from other official sources.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30511 Vaccari, Maria G. T. The role of socioeconomic factors in the migratory process. [II ruolo dei fattori economico-sociali nei processi migratori.] Economia Pubblica, Vol. 21, No. 11, Nov 1991. 529-38 pp. Milan, Italy. In Ita.
Factors affecting worldwide migration are analyzed using published U.N. data. The main emphasis is on international migration to Italy, the assimilation of immigrants, and migration prospects.
Location: New York Public Library.

58:30512 Vasileva, Darina. Bulgarian Turkish emigration and return. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 342-52 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
A brief review of Turkish migration patterns between Bulgaria and Turkey over the past 100 years is presented. The author then examines the 1989 exodus of Turks from Bulgaria, its political motivation, and the subsequent return migration that occurred after the fall of the regime that drove the Turkish population from Bulgaria. The impact of these movements on the Bulgarian economy is also examined.
Correspondence: D. Vasileva, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 7 Noemvri 1, 1040 Sofia, Bulgaria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30513 von Delhaes-Guenther, Dietrich. Migration between East and West Germany after World War II. [Le migrazioni tedesche Est-Ovest nel secondo dopoguerra.] Studi Emigrazione/Etudes Migrations, Vol. 29, No. 105, Mar 1992. 103-12 pp. Rome, Italy. In Ita. with sum. in Eng; Fre.
Migrations trends from East to West Germany during the period from the end of World War II to 1990 are reviewed. Migrants' demographic characteristics and preferred destinations are described. Patterns since 1990 are also discussed.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30514 Wilpert, Czarina. The use of social networks in Turkish migration to Germany. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 177-89 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
Migration from villages in Turkey to West Germany is studied to determine the role of social networks in the growth and maintenance of international migration systems. The period studied is from the early 1960s to the present. Changes in German migration law during that time and their effects are also analyzed.
Correspondence: C. Wilpert, Technische Universitat Berlin, Institut fur Sociologie, Str. des 17 Juni 135, 1000 Berlin 12, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30515 Wooden, Mark; Holton, Robert; Hugo, Graeme; Sloan, Judith. Australian immigration: a survey of the issues. ISBN 0-644-12709-0. 1990. x, 367 pp. Bureau of Immigration Research: South Carlton, Australia. Distributed by International Specialized Book Services, 5602 N.E. Hassalo Street, Portland, OR 97213. In Eng.
The authors provide a broad survey of issues related to immigration in Australia. The book "summarises and reviews the extant research on immigration and its impact on Australian society, its economy and its population, providing qualitative assessment of that research and identifying notable research gaps. The book is divided into five chapters dealing with the demographic and spatial aspects of immigration, its economic impact, social aspects, the labour market experience of immigrants, and immigration policy."
Correspondence: Bureau of Immigration Research, P.O. Box 659, South Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30516 Zlotnik, Hania. Empirical identification of international migration systems. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 19-40 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author outlines general principles for the identification and analysis of what constitutes an international migration system. These principles are then used to identify and characterize migration systems in the Americas and in Western Europe.
Correspondence: H. Zlotnik, United Nations, Population Division, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30517 Zlotnik, Hania. South-to-north migration since 1960: the view from the north. Population Bulletin of the United Nations, No. 31-32, 1991. 17-37 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"Using statistics on migration flows by country of origin gathered by three of the traditional countries of immigration (Australia, Canada and the United States of America) and five European countries (Belgium, Federal Republic of Germany, Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland), this paper analyses trends in migration from developing to developed countries, the so-called 'South-to-North' component of international migration. The data reveal that persons born in the developing world now constitute a majority of the immigrants admitted for resettlement by the traditional countries of immigration. In Europe, in contrast, migrants from developed countries still predominate in migrant inflows. However, during the 1980s, European countries generally gained population from the developing world, whereas they recorded only small or even negative net migration balances with respect to other developed countries."
Correspondence: H. Zlotnik, U.N. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, Population Trends and Structure Section, United Nations Secretariat, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.3. Internal Migration

Studies concerned with internal migration.

58:30518 Barkley, Andrew P. The determinants of interdistrict labour in-migration in Pakistan, 1971-1980. Pakistan Development Review, Vol. 30, No. 3, Autumn 1991. 275-96 pp. Islamabad, Pakistan. In Eng.
"This article begins by reviewing the previous literature pertinent to labour migration within Pakistan. Next, a migration equation at the aggregate level is specified, based on the expected socio-economic determinants of labour migration and data availability. Regression analysis was used to identify and quantify the determinants of interdistrict migration in Pakistan during the period 1971-1980. The results demonstrate that one of the major determinants of migration into a district was the percent of previous migrants in a district's population. Interdistrict migration was also significantly associated with the socio-economic variables of urbanization, population density, and literacy rates. The research presented here provides evidence that the movement of labour between districts in Pakistan is towards locations of superior socio-economic conditions."
Correspondence: A. P. Barkley, Kansas State University, Department of Agricultural Economics, Manhattan, KS 66506. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30519 Bian, Ruey-Fen. The relationship between socioeconomic development clusters and migration in Taiwan (1979-1988). Journal of Population Studies, No. 14, Dec 1991. 83-108 pp. Taipei, Taiwan. In Chi. with sum. in Eng.
"The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between socio-economic development and migration among different counties in Taiwan. Based on data of 1979 and 1988 this study examines the hypothesis that socio-economic development had an impact on migration. Using the method of cluster analysis, we identified six clusters of socio-economic development of counties in 1979 and in 1988....The examination...indicates that the higher the socio-economic development level, the higher the in-migration rate. In addition, the larger the difference between socio-economic clusters, the bigger the migration stream."
Correspondence: R.-F. Bian, National Taiwan University, Department of Agricultural Extension, 1 Roosevelt Road IV, Taipei, Taiwan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30520 Chen, Bo; Zhang, Zhiliang; Yuan, Huarong. The feasibility of population migration from arid mountainous areas of Central Gansu to the oasis west of the Yellow River in the province. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 3, No. 2, 1991. 145-56 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"This paper relates population migration [in China] to its point of origin and destination, and relates population issues to socioeconomic and environmental issues. At the same time, [the authors] also attempt an analysis of the feasibility of migration from arid mountainous areas in Central Gansu to the oasis west of the Yellow River...by combining logical deduction and empirical evidence."
Correspondence: B. Chen, Lanzhou University, Population Research Institute, 78 Tianshui Road, 730000 Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30521 Chen, Chaonan. Migration selectivity and its consequences on the occupational structure in the Taipei metropolis. Journal of Population Studies, No. 14, Dec 1991. 29-58 pp. Taipei, Taiwan. In Eng. with sum. in Chi.
Migrants' destination choices and their consequences are discussed using data for Taipei, Taiwan, and its surrounding areas. "We limit our focus on migration selectivity in terms of occupational structure only....We try to decompose the migration selectivity and its consequences by streams and moving motivation....[The author concludes that] overall the influence of migration selectivity on occupational structures is still dominated by the selectivity due to job and education needs."
Correspondence: C. Chen, Academia Sinica, Institute of Economics, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30522 Courgeau, Daniel. Net migration and density: France from 1954 to 1990. [Migration nette et densite: la France de 1954 a 1990.] Population, Vol. 47, No. 2, Mar-Apr 1992. 462-7 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
Levels and trends in internal migration and their effects on spatial distribution in France are considered for the period 1954-1990. Special consideration is given to rural-urban migration.
Correspondence: D. Courgeau, Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30523 Drysdale, Russell. Aged migration to coastal and inland centres in NSW. Australian Geographical Studies, Vol. 29, No. 2, Oct 1991. 268-84 pp. Campbell, Australia. In Eng.
The household characteristics and migration behavior of elderly migrants in Australia are compared. The results indicate that "inland movers are significantly different [from] coastal movers in socioeconomic and demographic respects, such as age, mobility, the location of the nearest child and previous occupation."
Correspondence: R. Drysdale, University of New England, Department of Geography and Planning, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia. Location: New York Public Library.

58:30524 Grimmeau, Jean-Pierre. Migration and the linguistic boundary in Belgium. [Les migrations et la frontiere linguistique en Belgique.] Espace, Populations, Societes, No. 2, 1992. 253-8 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre.
This study looks at the impact of language on internal migration in Belgium.
Correspondence: J.-P. Grimmeau, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Laboratoire de Geographie Humaine, Campus de la Plaine, CP 246, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30525 Halfacree, Keith H.; Flowerdew, Robin; Johnson, James H. The characteristics of British migrants in the 1990s: evidence from a new survey. Geographical Journal, Vol. 158, No. 2, Jul 1992. 157-69 pp. London, England. In Eng.
The authors examine "new data on migrants in Great Britain [that] have been collected as part of a Gallup Poll. Data are available for 18,010 respondents on the length of time since they last moved, and for 3,605 of these on whether the move was intra-urban, intra-county or inter-county. Respondents' personal characteristics are also available, including sex, age, marital status, household size, tenure, education, employment status, occupation and social class. These characteristics were cross-tabulated against migration and type of move. All personal characteristics had strongly significant relationships with migration, the strongest being age, housing tenure and employment."
Correspondence: K. H. Halfacree, Lancaster University, Department of Geography, Lancaster LA1 4YB, England. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

58:30526 Jackman, Richard; Savouri, Savvas. An analysis of migration based on the hiring function. Applied Economics Discussion Paper, No. 98, Sep 1990. 84 pp. University of Oxford, Institute of Economics and Statistics: Oxford, England. In Eng.
"Using annual data on inter regional migration [in the United Kingdom] covering the period 1975-87 we show that regional characteristics such as industrial employment composition, which help capture matching opportunities between pairs of regions, help determine migration flows across those regions. Further, we find the increases in the level of unemployment at the regional level raise migration while increases at the national level and an increasing share of long-term unemployment at the regional level reduce it, as does an increase in the mortgage interest rate. We also show that a distance proxy...plays a major role in explaining migration behaviour."
Correspondence: University of Oxford, Institute of Economics and Statistics, St. Cross Building, Manor Road, Oxford OX1 3UL, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30527 Jackman, Richard; Savouri, Savvas. Regional migration versus regional commuting: the identification of housing and employment flows. Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 39, No. 3, Aug 1992. 272-87 pp. Cambridge, Massachusetts/Oxford, England. In Eng.
Internal migration flows in Great Britain are analyzed using data from official sources, with a focus on the identification of housing and employment as major factors affecting migration. The importance of distinguishing flows across adjacent regions from those among noncontiguous regions is stressed.
Correspondence: R. Jackman, Centre for Economic Performance, London, England. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

58:30528 Kawabe, Hiroshi; Liaw, Kao-Lee. Marriage and migration in Japan: an explanation by personal factors and ecological variables. NUPRI Research Paper Series, No. 60, Mar 1992. vi, 51 pp. Nihon University, Population Research Institute: Tokyo, Japan. In Eng.
"This paper applies a nested logit model to the migration data from a [1986] national survey to explain the interprefectural migration behaviors of the Japanese at the time of their marriage by personal factors (attributes of the decision makers) and ecological variables (attributes of the alternatives in the choice set). Before marriage, each person is considered a potential migrant making a two-level decision: to stay or depart at the upper level, and to choose a destination at the lower level."
Correspondence: Nihon University, Population Research Institute, 3-2 Misaki-cho 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30529 Kiss, Eva. Migration in the Tisza River region. [Migracio a Kozep-Tisza-Bideken.] Statisztikai Szemle, Vol. 70, No. 3, Mar 1992. 242-55 pp. Budapest, Hungary. In Hun. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
Out-migration and its effect on an area near Hungary's Tisza River are described. The author notes that while out-migration has slowed in the last decade, those who leave are more highly educated, skilled, and under 40 years of age. The impact of this migration on population structure, including age distribution, is assessed.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30530 Leenothai, Sunee. The role of growth centers in migration of women: destination choices of female migrants in Thailand. Working Papers in Demography, No. 26, 1991. 39 pp. Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Division of Demography and Sociology: Canberra, Australia. In Eng.
"Using the Thai Labor Force survey of 1988, this paper examines the role of growth centers in Thai female migration flows. A mixed conditional multinomial logit model, based partially on Todaro's migration model and the human capital framework, is employed to study the migration destination choices of female migrants and identify the extent to which the choices depend on economic characteristics in the destinations and the individual characteristics of female migrants. The results indicate that growth centers, as newly developing areas, were attractive to young migrants with secondary education, and offered employment opportunities mainly in service occupations. However, after controlling for individual characteristics, economic characteristics in destinations had little pull effect on migration of women."
Correspondence: Australian National University, Research School of Social Sciences, Division of Demography and Sociology, P.O. Box 4, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30531 Lim, Lin Lean; Ogawa, Naohiro; Hodge, Robert W. The impact of an integrated agricultural development program on migration in Malaysia. NUPRI Research Paper Series, No. 61, Mar 1992. vi, 46 pp. Nihon University, Population Research Institute: Tokyo, Japan. In Eng.
"This paper examines the impact on migration of an Integrated Agricultural Development Project (IADP) in Peninsular Malaysia. The study is based on an in-depth community-level and household-level survey in two small rural communities....[Examination] of the survey data reveals that there are no consistent patterns of differences in the migration variables between the two sites. This implies that rural development can both stimulate migration by bringing rural populations into the mainstream of the larger society and retard it by improving local conditions. To the extent that these forces, operating in opposite directions, also have impacts of more or less similar magnitude, we cannot expect schemes such as the IADP to curb the influx of rural dwellers to urban centers."
Correspondence: Nihon University, Population Research Institute, 3-2 Misaki-cho 1 chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101, Japan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30532 Lipshitz, Gabriel. Ethnic differences in migration patterns--disparities among Arabs and Jews in the peripheral regions of Israel. Professional Geographer, Vol. 43, No. 4, Nov 1991. 445-56 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"The present study examines spatial patterns of Arab and Jewish populations in Israel's national periphery. The migration trends of Arabs and Jews in the northern national periphery (the Galilee) are compared with those of the southern national periphery (the Negev). The Arab and Jewish populations within these areas show different spatial patterns of migration: in both the northern and the southern peripheries, Jews tend to migrate from the periphery to the core, while Arabs tend to migrate within the periphery. These differences increase the ratio of Arabs to Jews in both regions. The findings suggest that researchers should examine subregions and subgroups when studying migration patterns."
Correspondence: G. Lipshitz, Bar-Ilan University, 52 100 Ramat-Gan, Israel. Location: Princeton University Library (SG).

58:30533 Narayana, M. R. Criteria for model choice in the context of India's inter-regional migration: an applied econometric study. Demography India, Vol. 19, No. 2, Jul-Dec 1990. 205-16 pp. Delhi, India. In Eng.
The author proposes a "disaggregate economic model for India's inter-regional (or, inter-state) migration, and [estimates] it by standard econometric techniques with alternative specifications of the independent/explanatory variables and functional forms....[The author] details the criteria for model choice in the context of the disaggregate economic model of migration....In the light of the appropriate model chosen, a brief economic interpretation of estimation results [is] given."
Correspondence: M. R. Narayana, UNFPA Global Training Program in Population and Development, Centre for Development Studies, Prashantanagar Road, Trivandrum 695 011, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30534 Plane, David A.; Rogerson, Peter A. Tracking the baby boom, the baby bust, and the echo generations: how age composition regulates U.S. migration. Professional Geographer, Vol. 43, No. 4, Nov 1991. 416-30 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"U.S. regional and state migration data from the 1940s-80s, when members of the baby boom generation aged into their years of peak labor force mobility, suggest ways in which changing age composition regulates geographical mobility and interregional migration. Labor supply pressure plays a key role in the dynamics of the national migration system. A 'delayed mobility' effect in the 1980s similar to the delayed fertility of the baby boom cohorts appears to be a result of the depressed rates of mobility experienced by members of this generation when they flooded regional labor markets with record numbers of entrants in the 1970s. Recent temporal shifts in age-specific volumes of interregional migration help predict the future pace of migration based upon the projected age distribution of the nation."
Correspondence: D. A. Plane, University of Arizona, Department of Geography and Regional Development, Tucson, AZ 85721. Location: Princeton University Library (SG).

58:30535 Rakowski, Witold; Poniatowska-Jaksch, Malgorzata. Infrastructure supporting the permanent migration of urban populations in Ciechanow voivodship. [Infrastruktura migracji stalych ludnosci woj. ciechanowskiego.] Biuletyn IGS, Vol. 32, No. 3, 1989. 141-220, 354-5, 360 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Pol. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
The authors examine the factors affecting migration in Ciechanow voivodship, Poland. Topics covered include socioeconomic development of the region and its towns, migration flows, population growth and natural increase, and public transportation. The effects of the neighboring cities of Warsaw and Gdansk on migration are considered.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30536 Rakowski, Witold. Migration patterns in Radom voivodship. Regional problems in the Warsaw area. Volume 3. [Studium migracji ludnosci miasta wojewodzkiego (na przykladzie Radomia). Problemy regionu warszawskiego. Tom III.] Biuletyn IGS, Vol. 31, No. 4, 1988. 247 pp. Szkola Glowna Handlowa, Instytut Gospodarstwa Spolecznego: Warsaw, Poland. In Pol. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
Migration trends in Radom voivodship, Poland, are analyzed and compared for the period 1976-1987. Tables, charts, and maps present data on natural increase; demographic characteristics of migrants, including sex, age, and socioeconomic, educational, and marital status; and rural-urban migration.
Correspondence: Szkola Glowna Handlowa, Instytut Gospodarstwa Spolecznego, Warsaw, Poland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30537 Rogers, Andrei. Interregional elderly migration and population redistribution in the United States. Population Program Working Paper, No. WP-91-7, Dec 1991. 27, [28] pp. University of Colorado, Institute of Behavioral Science, Population Program: Boulder, Colorado. In Eng.
Internal migration by the U.S. elderly population is discussed, with a focus on destination patterns, socioeconomic characteristics, and consequences for both place of origin and destination.
Correspondence: University of Colorado, Institute of Behavioral Science, Population Program, Boulder, CO 80309. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30538 Serow, William J.; Haas, William H. Measuring the economic impact of retirement migration: the case of western North Carolina. Journal of Applied Gerontology, Vol. 11, No. 2, Jun 1992. 200-15 pp. Newbury Park, California. In Eng.
The authors investigate the economic impact of elderly migrants, using 1989 data for a sample of 814 persons who had recently moved to western North Carolina. "The article concludes with a discussion of the extent to which retirement migration in this context truly represents a net economic gain to the host community."
Correspondence: W. J. Serow, Florida State University, Center for the the Study of Population, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4063. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30539 Singh, Kamaljit. Internal migration in a developing economy. ISBN 81-85135-63-0. 1991. viii, 247 pp. National Book Organisation: New Delhi, India. In Eng.
This study is concerned with the causes and consequences of migration and its effect on a developing economy, using the example of Punjab, India. Topics covered include the socioeconomic characteristics of migrants; the role of remittances on the rural economy; the impact of migration on the rural economy, including agricultural technology, labor use, and output; and the impact of migration on the urban economy. Data are from field studies carried out in 1986.
Correspondence: National Book Organisation, H-39 Green Park Extension, New Delhi 110 016, India. Location: New York Public Library.

58:30540 Stillwell, John; Rees, Philip; Boden, Peter. Migration processes and patterns. Volume 2: population redistribution in the United Kingdom. ISBN 1-85293-194-9. LC 91-34230. 1992. xxii, 307 pp. Belhaven Press: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
This is the second of two volumes on migration in the United Kingdom. It "provides an analysis of the changing level, composition and geographical patterns of migration taking place within the United Kingdom during the 1970s and 1980s. The book contains contributions prepared by members of a Working Party on 'internal migration' set up under the aegis of the Institute of British Geographers. Chapters are organised on the basis of the national, regional or systematic perspectives which they offer. [The volume demonstrates] the importance of migration and...its role as a key agent of demographic, social and economic change in a post-industrial society."
For Volume 1, also published in 1992 and covering recent migration research, see 58:20521.
Correspondence: Belhaven Press, 25 Floral Street, London WC2E 9DS, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30541 Thailand. National Statistical Office (Bangkok, Thailand). Survey of migration into Khon Kaen province, 1989. [1992?]. 34, 53 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng; Tha.
This report presents results from an ongoing survey of migration in Thailand. In 1989, the survey was conducted in the provinces of Surat Thani, Chiang Mai, and Khon Kaen; this is one of three publications presenting results from that survey. Data concerning the characteristics of migrants to the province are provided.
For a report from the 1987 round, see 56:30551.
Correspondence: National Statistical Office, Statistical Information Division, Larn Luang Road, Bangkok 10100, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30542 Tian, Xinyuan. Population movement, marriage, and fertility change. Chinese Journal of Population Science, Vol. 3, No. 1, 1991. 27-44 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"In this article I will first review and discuss some related works published in China...on questions of population movement, [marriage,] and fertility planning; the second objective is to explore the relationship between these using actual figures based on the Chinese material that can be used; the third stage is...an evaluation of and recommendations for accomplishments in current research, so as to clarify some of the problems that the floating population might cause in the course of implementing fertility planning."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.4. Settlement and Resettlement

Studies on international and internal settlement and resettlement, including programs concerned with refugees and their settlement and with forced migrations.

58:30543 Kostrubiec, Benjamin; Zyszkowska, Wieslawa. Territorial disruption and forced migration during the twentieth century in Poland. [Bouleversements territoriaux et migrations forcees au XXeme siecle en Pologne.] Espace, Populations, Societes, No. 2, 1992. 203-14 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
The impact of political changes in the frontiers of Poland on the composition of the country's population is analyzed. The focus is on the large-scale resettlement of the population that such changes involved.
Correspondence: B. Kostrubiec, Universite Lille 1, U.F.R. de Geographie, Batiment 2, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq Cedex, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30544 Mathieu, Jean-Luc. Migrants and refugees. [Migrants et refugies.] Que Sais-Je?, No. 2606, ISBN 2-13-043800-8. 1991. 126 pp. Presses Universitaires de France: Paris, France. In Fre.
Global trends concerning refugees are reviewed. Particular attention is given to refugee rights.
Correspondence: Presses Universitaires de France, 108 boulevard Saint-Germain, 75006 Paris, France. Location: Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, Paris, France.

58:30545 Rychtarikova, Jitka; Rehak, Jan. Populations and borders: the case of Czechoslovakia. [Populations et frontieres: le cas de la Tchecoslovaquie.] Espace, Populations, Societes, No. 2, 1992. 185-201 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
Demographic changes in the border areas of what is now Czechoslovakia are analyzed for the period 1869-1991. The focus is on the population movements during and after World War II.
Correspondence: J. Rychtarikova, Charles University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Demography and Geodemography, Albertov 6, 12 843 Prague, Czechoslovakia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30546 Stola, Dariusz. Forced migrations in Central European history. International Migration Review, Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer 1992. 324-41 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
The author reviews forced migrations that occurred in central Europe over the past 200 years, with a focus on those that took place during the twentieth century. He concludes that "although the social and political reality in Central Europe has changed, some factors which have previously led to forced migration can still be observed today."
Correspondence: D. Stola, Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Instytut Historii, Rynek Starego Miasta 29/31, 00-272 Warsaw, Poland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.5. Temporary Migration

Migration, both internal and international, in which the stay is temporary. Includes return migration, transit migration, commuting, and seasonal migration.

58:30547 Findlay, Allan. Arab return migration from the Gulf Co-operation Council states: patterns, trends and prospects. World Employment Programme Research Working Paper, No. MIG WP.43, ISBN 92-2-107298-3. Oct 1989. ii, 40 pp. International Labour Office [ILO], International Migration for Employment Branch: Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng.
The extent and composition of return migration from the Gulf to the original sending countries, including Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen, are analyzed. Comparisons are made with the situation of temporary migration to Western Europe. An attempt is made to forecast possible trends in return migration from 1990 to 2000 (these forecasts do not take into account the Gulf war of 1991).
Correspondence: International Labour Office, 4 route des Morillons, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30548 Kritz, Mary M.; Caces, Fe. Science and technology transfers and migration flows. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 221-42 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
The authors examine temporary skilled migration to developing countries and policies set up to encourage transfers of technology. "Developing countries are increasingly looking abroad for the technical expertise needed in the development process. A two-pronged strategy has evolved: (1) to draw on foreign technology and technical advisers as a short-term solution to existing deficiencies; and (2) to send nationals abroad for graduate and/or advanced-level study in the sciences and engineering as a long-term approach towards strengthening indigenous science and technology capability."
Correspondence: M. M. Kritz, Cornell University, Population and Development Program, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30549 Lim, Lin Lean. International labour movements: a perspective on economic exchanges and flows. In: International migration systems: a global approach, edited by Mary M. Kritz, Lin Lean Lim, and Hania Zlotnik. 1992. 133-49 pp. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. In Eng.
International labor migration as a means of economic exchange among countries is discussed. Policy changes in receiving countries are analyzed within that context. "Instead of admitting foreign workers as immigrants with the moral and socio-political obligations to them that such an option implies, countries...prefer to pay for a rotating stock of temporary labour that is exactly of the right type, available when needed, and disposable when not, and whose demand on social expenditures and integration within the host society is minimal. Host countries are also increasingly precise about the specific skill qualifications and other attributes that labour should possess to be allowed entry for work purposes." The geographical scope is worldwide.
Correspondence: L. L. Lim, International Labour Organization, Labour and Population Team for Asia and the Pacific, G.P.O. Box 1759, 10th Floor, U.N. Building, Sala Santitham, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30550 Mohr, Bernhard. German commuters in Switzerland: recent trends and changes. [Les frontaliers allemands en Suisse: evolution recente et mutations.] Espace, Populations, Societes, No. 2, 1992. 237-51 pp. Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng.
Recent trends in daily migration from Germany to northern Switzerland are analyzed. Increases in the volume of this migration are noted. The characteristics of the commuting population are then reviewed.
Correspondence: B. Mohr, Albert-Ludwig Universitat, Geowissenschaftliche Fakultat, Geographisches Institut 1, Werderring 4, D-7800 Freiburg-in-Breisgau, Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

58:30551 Shabanova, M. A. Modern seasonal migration as a sociocultural phenomenon. [Sovremennoe otkhodnichestvo kak sotsiokul'turnyi fenomen.] Sotsiologicheskie Issledovaniya, No. 4, 1992. 55-63 pp. Moscow, Russia. In Rus.
Seasonal labor migration patterns within the countries of the former USSR are analyzed. The author notes that most of this migration is officially illegal, involves long working hours, and has developed in response to laws of supply and demand. Most of the migration is from outlying republics to areas of labor shortage in Eastern Europe and the European parts of Russia. These migrations are tolerated by the government on the grounds that they help alleviate socioeconomic problems associated with the gap between the demand for labor and human resources.
Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

H.6. Rural-Urban Migration

Migration from rural to urban areas (the rural exodus), both internal and international. Reverse or turnaround migration is also included.

58:30552 Kanaroglou, P. S.; Braun, G. O. The pattern of counterurbanization in the Federal Republic of Germany, 1977-85. Environment and Planning A, Vol. 24, No. 4, Apr 1992. 481-96 pp. London, England. In Eng.
County-level data are used to examine the evidence for turnaround migration from urban to rural areas in the Federal Republic of Germany during the period 1978-1985. "The coexistence of suburbanization and counterurbanization for the 1978-85 time period is demonstrated. Young adults, 18-25 years of age, gravitated towards the urban cores of metropolitan areas and smaller urban areas. All the other age-groups moved mainly towards the outer suburbs of metropolitan areas, the suburbs of second-tier cities, and the rural counties. The two migration matrices indicate that counterurbanization at the level of regional planning areas was not present in 1977 but started in 1978 and it was present in 1983. At the same spatial level, evidence of a net gain of metropolitan areas from second-tier cities and rural areas is also provided for 1977. This pattern was reversed for the 1978-85 period."
Correspondence: P. S. Kanaroglou, McMaster University, Department of Geography, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

58:30553 Komendarczyk, Ewa; Poniatowska-Jaksch, Malgorzata. Spatial and socio-demographic structures supporting the migration of the urban populations in Ciechanow voivodship. [Struktura przestrzenna i demograficzno-spoleczna migracji ludnosci miast woj. ciechanowskiego.] Biuletyn IGS, Vol. 32, No. 3, 1989. 221-349, 355, 360-1 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Pol. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
Migration patterns in Ciechanow voivodship, Poland, are analyzed and compared using official data for the period 1976-1987. The focus of the article is on the determinants of migration to urban areas in the region, including age and sex factors and marital and educational status. The impact of the cities of Warsaw and Gdansk on migration in the region is assessed.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


Copyright © 1992-1996, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.