Volume 56 - Number 3 - Fall 1990

H. Migration

Studies that treat quantitative data on migration analytically. Methodological studies concerned primarily with migration are coded in this division and cross-referenced to N. Methods of Research and Analysis Including Models , as appropriate. Includes some consideration of policy aspects, but studies relating primarily to policies designed to affect migration are coded under M.3. Measures Affecting Migration .

H.1. General Migration

Studies that concern both international and internal migration.

56:30473 Achanfuo-Yeboah, David. A theoretical model for the study of migration and urbanisation. Population Research Laboratory Discussion Paper, No. 66, May 1990. 7 pp. University of Alberta, Department of Sociology, Population Research Laboratory: Edmonton, Canada. In Eng.
"The proposed model is based on the principle that sociocultural, economic and political developments work through a number of variables, to increase the propensity to migrate and, hence, influence internal migration and urbanisation....The utility of this model is that it will make it easier to carry out empirical studies of the determinants of migration and urbanisation." The geographical focus in on developing countries.
Correspondence: University of Alberta, Department of Sociology, Population Research Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H4, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30474 Bah, Sulaiman M. The application of multiregional demography to the estimation of migration using African data. Population Studies Centre Discussion Paper, No. 90-2, Feb 1990. 22 pp. University of Western Ontario, Population Studies Centre: London, Canada. In Eng.
"Over the past decade...many techniques have been developed and models have been proposed which [make] it possible for analysts to use data from one census to compute interregional migration, emigration and to construct migration life tables with or without mortality included. Some of these techniques can be directly applicable to African data....Others however need some modification before they can be applicable. The purpose of this paper is to review some of these techniques and suggest modifications to be made or questions that can be used to elicit information needed for their application. Attention will be focused on multiregional demography and the various indirect estimation techniques that are possible within it."
Correspondence: University of Western Ontario, Population Studies Centre, Department of Sociology, London, Ontario N6A 5C2, Canada.

56:30475 Beaujot, Roderic; Shiel, S.; Schoel, L. The role of immigration in changing demographic structures: the Canadian case. Population Studies Centre Discussion Paper, No. 89-6, Sep 1989. 13, [10] pp. University of Western Ontario, Population Studies Centre: London, Canada. In Eng.
"Using estimates and projections, the paper first analyzes the past and future contribution of immigration to population growth in Canada....Immigration, and to a lesser extent the subsequent internal migration of the foreign-born, has an important impact on the geographic distribution of Canada's population, accentuating the regional inequalities in relative population sizes. The composition of the foreign-born by place of origin has changed considerably over the various periods of immigration....Both for Quebec and the rest of Canada, immigration reduces the relative strength of the French language in Canada."
Correspondence: University of Western Ontario, Population Studies Centre, Department of Sociology, London, Ontario N6A 5C2, Canada.

56:30476 Brydon, Lynne. Who moves? Women and migration in West Africa in the 1980s. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 165-80 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"I shall focus mainly on the facts, nature, and consequences of the movement of women: the kinds of evidence and data available, and some of the ideological presumptions long associated with women's migration, but first I discuss briefly both problems in studies of migration and the evidence for and consequences of skilled worker movement....I have suggested...that women tend to fill a much narrower range of jobs than do men, and that financial problems in urban areas, the facts of maternity and non-marriage, have brought about significant changes in both population and 'traditional' residential group structures in the rural areas." Data are from studies conducted during the period 1977-1985 in Avatime, Ghana.
Correspondence: L. Brydon, University of Liverpool, Department of Sociology, POB 147, Liverpool L69 3BX, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30477 Eades, Jeremy. Migrants, workers, and the social order. ASA Monograph, No. 26, ISBN 0-422-61680-X. LC 87-10253. 1987. xi, 281 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
This is a collection of papers presented at the 1986 conference of the Association of Social Anthropologists, held in Canterbury, England. "The papers included here are arranged loosely around five overlapping themes: Patterns of migration flow within and between regions...; The political context of wage labour together with its effects on the migrants' areas of origin...; Women and migration...; Migrants as entrepeneurs...; [and] Class, ethnicity, and competition for resources...."
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Correspondence: Tavistock Publications, 29 West 35th Street, New York, NY 10001. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30478 Fitzpatrick, Peter. Migration, resistance, and the law in colonial Papua New Guinea. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 99-112 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
The author reviews Papua New Guinea's labor system transition from indentured labor to free labor. The main focus is on the popular resistance to labor migration and its long-term effects on labor and the law.
Correspondence: P. Fitzpatrick, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30479 Guest, Philip. Labor allocation and rural development: migration in four Javanese villages. Brown University Studies in Population and Development, ISBN 0-8133-7792-7. LC 89-5663. 1989. xxvi, 229 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/London, England. In Eng.
"This volume...addresses some of the major issues of comparative development, migration types, and economic changes in rural areas of Third World nations....Survey data [collected in 1985 in Java] at the household and village levels [are used] to examine how migration is connected to strategies of labor allocation among families and communities, how these strategies are linked to agrarian changes, rural developments, and demographic patterns, and how household labor supply and access to employment are related to diverse types of migration."
Correspondence: Westview Press, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30480 Gunes-Ayata, Ayse. Migrants and natives: urban bases of social conflict. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 234-48 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
The author identifies conflicts between natives and migrants in the town of Gebze, Turkey, that have become common during the last 25 years of rapid industrialization and labor migration. "Three areas of conflict are predominant in Gebze: the struggle for land and the allocation of municipal resources; the job market; and conflict arising from cultural differences. There are two dimensions of conflict, class cleavage, and ethnicity, both of which at least partly involve voluntary associations as organized interest groups. So not only is there conflict, but it is organized conflict with important political implications."
Correspondence: A. Gunes-Ayata, Middle East Technical University, Ismet Inonu Bulvari, Ankara, Turkey. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30481 Gurak, Douglas T.; Caces, Fe. Migrant networks; mechanisms for shaping migrations and their sequelae. Population and Development Program: 1989 Working Paper Series, No. 1.08, Mar 1989. 32 pp. Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology: Ithaca, New York. In Eng.
"This chapter evaluates principal contributions in the research literature to our understanding of the functioning of migrant networks, while specifying analytic issues that require more focused attention if the impact of migrant networks on the migration process and its sequelae is to be understood....[It] proceeds first with an overview of the operation of migrant networks within internal and international migration flows....The objective is to identify the major network concepts, their manner of utilization, and the extent to which empirical evidence for specific points exists. Having summarized central themes regarding the role of networks in the migration processes of adaptation, selectivity, and evolution, the next section develops several ideas derived from network analysts working in areas other than migration."
Correspondence: Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30482 Ikonomu, Theodor P. On the causes, types, and consequences of migration. [Uber Grunde, Arten und Folgen von Migration.] Osterreichische Zeitschrift fur Soziologie, Vol. 13, No. 3, 1988. 63-73 pp. Vienna, Austria. In Ger.
A theoretical overview of the causes, types, and consequences of migration is presented. Seven categories are discussed: social, historical, cultural, ecological, economic, personal, and political.
Location: Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, CA.

56:30483 Rogerson, Peter A. Buffon's needle and the estimation of migration distances. Mathematical Population Studies, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1990. 229-38 pp. New York, New York/London, England. In Eng. with sum. in Fre.
"A procedure is suggested for estimating migration distances from data on the proportion of migrants crossing regional boundaries. The method makes use of Buffon's needle, a problem in geometrical probability from the eighteenth century....The procedure is described for various scenarios that differ in their assumptions about region shape, the spatial distribution of population, and the distribution of migration distances. An application to migration distances in the United States is given, and additional attention is given to the estimation of intraregional migration distances."
Correspondence: P. A. Rogerson, State University of New York, Department of Geography, Buffalo, NY 14260. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30484 Sakai, Hiromichi. The elderly migration: characteristics and reasons. Jinko Mondai Kenkyu/Journal of Population Problems, Vol. 45, No. 3, Oct 1989. 1-13 pp. Tokyo, Japan. In Jpn. with sum. in Eng.
The author reviews four issues concerning the recent trend of increased elderly migration in Japan. Included are the motivation for migration, identification of origin and destination, demographic characteristics, and acculturation after migration. Data are from the 1988 Elderly Migration Survey.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30485 Skeldon, Ronald. Population mobility in developing countries: a reinterpretation. ISBN 1-85293-096-9. LC 89-28629. 1990. x, 273 pp. Belhaven Press: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"I will argue that the search for an understanding of human mobility can most profitably be pursued following an approach which is evolutionary, structural, and generalizing rather than static, individualistic, and specific....The emphasis throughout the book is on the causes and consequences of the systematic changes in the spatial and temporal forms of migration at the global level....This book has three main objectives. First, I present empirical evidence to show that systematic changes in population migration have occurred and do occur. Secondly, through the case material, and utilizing as much evidence from the literature as possible, I try to come, if not to an ultimate explanation of migration, then to a greater understanding of how and why it changes in the way that it does. Thirdly, I hope that my approach provides an example in comparative method...." Case studies on Peru and Papua New Guinea are included.
Correspondence: Belhaven Press, 25 Floral Street, London WC2E 9DS, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30486 Weidlich, Wolfgang; Munz, Martin. Settlement formation. Part I: a dynamic theory. Annals of Regional Science, Vol. 24, No. 2, 1990. 83-106 pp. New York, New York/Berlin, Germany, Federal Republic of. In Eng.
"The dynamic process of settlement formation is a fundamental issue in regional science. Our proposed model integrates the economic and migratory sectors in terms of endogenous variables in order to describe the evolution of continuous population distributions as a self-organising process....The purpose...is to show that under strongly idealised conditions, a population consisting of different subpopulations with different economic activities will evolve into a differentiated population pattern. Each member of the subpopulations has the possibility to migrate between locations stimulated by rational economic reasons. This idea, which seems almost self-evident on the level of qualitative argumentation, [will] be cast into a mathematically self-contained quantitative dynamic model."
Correspondence: W. Weidlich, Universitat Stuttgart, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Pfaffenwaldring 57/III, D-7000 Stuttgart 80, Federal Republic of Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

H.2. International Migration

Studies concerned with international migration, including the brain drain.

56:30487 Amjad, Rashid. To the Gulf and back: studies on the economic impact of Asian labour migration. ISBN 92-2-106705-X. 1989. ix, 369 pp. International Labour Office [ILO], Asian Employment Programme: Geneva, Switzerland; Asian Regional Team for Employment Promotion [ARTEP]: New Delhi, India. In Eng.
"The studies presented in this volume are part of a series of investigative studies organised [as part of]...the ILO-UNDP Project, Asian Regional Programme on International Labour Migration (RAS/85/009). These studies are aimed at examining the economic impact of overseas migration on the labour sending countries so as to evolve a framework for [the] incorporation of overseas migration in the development planning process." Separate papers consider the economic effects of labor out-migration on Bangladesh, India, South Korea, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.
Correspondence: International Labour Office Publications, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30488 Appleyard, Reginald. International migration and developing countries. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 19-36 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
The author examines the impact of international migration on developing countries. "The proposition presented here is that the governments of most developing countries attempt to utilise legal migration to facilitate economic growth. Under agreements made with labour-short countries, contract workers emigrate under fairly strict conditions imposed by receivers. By and large, developing countries have been unable, and largely unwilling, to prevent the emigration of their professional and skilled workers to developed countries on a permanent basis. And in view of the characteristic pressure of population on resources, most developing countries are not willing to admit immigrants for permanent residence although they readily accept transient professionals for short periods."
Correspondence: R. Appleyard, University of Western Australia, Centre for Migration and Development Studies, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30489 Appleyard, Reginald. The impact of international migration on developing countries. Development Centre Seminar, ISBN 92-64-13201-5. 1989. 404 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"This volume contains twenty-three papers contributed to a project sponsored jointly by...the Committee for International Co-operation in National Research in Demography (CICRED), the Intergovernmental Committee for Migration (ICM) and the Development Centre of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)." The focus of the project was on the demographic and socioeconomic effects of international migration movements on sending and receiving countries in the developing world. Sections are included on theory, measurement, and policies; types of migration, including temporary, clandestine, transient professional, permanent, refugee, and return; and overviews.
Correspondence: OECD Publications Service, 2 rue Andre-Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30490 Athukorala, Premachandra. International contract migration and the reintegration of return migrants: the experience of Sri Lanka. International Migration Review, Vol. 24, Summer 1990. 323-46 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This article attempts to shed light on the issue of how far the labor exporting countries can monitor the process of reinsertion of return migrants in the domestic economy, with a view to maximizing net gains from international labor migration, drawing upon the experience of Sri Lanka. It begins with an examination of the socioeconomic characteristics of migrant workers with special emphasis on their post-migration activity status and the pattern of remittance utilization. Then it proceeds to evaluate critically the self-employment scheme that has been introduced by the Sri Lankan labor administration to advise and train return migrants in establishing themselves in business. The findings point to the danger of expecting too much from policy initiatives in this sphere."
Correspondence: P. Athukorala, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3083, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30491 Ballard, Roger. The political economy of migration: Pakistan, Britain, and the Middle East. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 17-41 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
The focus of this article is on the political and economic changes and socioeconomic inequalities initiated by international migration. The experience of peasant farmers from northern Pakistan who have migrated to Great Britain and the Middle East over the past three decades is used as an example. Their acculturation, including marriage patterns, labor force participation, and social behavior, is examined. Emphasis is given to migrants' lack of political power in their new homeland.
Correspondence: R. Ballard, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30492 Beaujot, Roderic; Rappak, J. Peter. The link between immigration and emigration in Canada, 1945-1986. Canadian Studies in Population, Vol. 16, No. 2, 1989. 201-16 pp. Edmonton, Canada. In Eng. with sum. in Fre.
"The objective of this paper is to focus on the link between immigration and emigration [in Canada]. First, an historical view to determine the extent of a relationship between these two types of international population movements is taken. Then the subsequent emigration of immigrants themselves is estimated. In so doing, the 'flow' of immigrants from various parts of the world along with their 'stock' at the subsequent censuses is looked at." It is found that "departures are somewhat higher for immigrants from countries culturally similar to Canada, and for persons who are over 50 years of age on arrival. About 60 per cent of emigration from Canada in the period 1961-86 consists of the departure of previous immigrants....The paper ends with a discussion of the dynamics of return migration and its importance to Canadian immigration policy."
Correspondence: R. Beaujot, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30493 Blayo, Chantal. Problems of measurement. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 63-7 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"In order to analyse the demographic impact of international migration on the development of a developing country, it is necessary to measure its influence on the resident population....Lack of adequate statistics on departure from many countries poses a considerable difficulty in this regard." Possible methods of measuring migration trends in the absence of reliable data are evaluated.
Correspondence: C. Blayo, Universite de Bordeaux I, Institut d'Etudes Demographiques, 351 cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence Cedex, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30494 Bouvier, Leon. Immigration, population change, and the American mosaic. [Immigration, changement demographique et la mosaique americaine.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1990. 45-58 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
"This article looks at the relationships among immigration, fertility and mortality to explain the changes that have occurred and will continue to occur in the population of the United States. Emphasis centers on the recent past, the present and the first half of the 21st century. It is pointed out that the nation will undergo major changes in its age and ethnic composition in the near future because of the aging of the baby boom generation and the continued high level of immigration from Latin America and Asia....In the paper's conclusion, alternative policy options are considered."
Correspondence: L. Bouvier, 3817 Huey Court, Virginia Beach, VA 23456. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30495 Campbell, Charles M. A time bomb ticking: Canadian immigration in crisis. Mackenzie Paper, No. 16, ISBN 0-921877-16-1. 1989. 39 pp. Mackenzie Institute for the Study of Terrorism, Revolution and Propaganda: Toronto, Canada. In Eng.
The author reviews issues concerning international migration to Canada. Special consideration is given to immigration law, its abuses and failures to apply it, and to skills and literacy levels of immigrants and refugees.
Correspondence: Mackenzie Institute for the Study of Terrorism, Revolution and Propaganda, Suite 906, 100 Adelaide Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5H 1S3, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30496 Chiswick, Barry R. Immigration and the economy of the United States. [L'immigration et l'economie des Etats-Unis.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1990. 59-70 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
"This paper is concerned with how immigration and immigration policy have influenced the economy of the United States. It focuses on the events of the past quarter century, particularly since the enactment of the 1965 Amendments to the Immigration and Nationality Act. It begins with a review of the demographic characteristics of immigrants and how these characteristics have changed over time, in part in response to changes in immigration policy....This is followed by a discussion of the labor market (economic) characteristics and adjustment of immigrants. The impact of immigrants, particularly low-skilled immigrants, on the level and inequality of income in the economy is explored."
Correspondence: B. Chiswick, University of Illinois, Department of Economics, Room 2103, Box 4348 University Hall, Chicago, IL 60680. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30497 d'Oliveira e Sousa, J. The brain drain issue in international negotiations. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 197-212 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"This chapter attempts to show how the brain drain issue and its impact on developing countries have been dealt with in international negotiations. The first part deals with the rise of international concern since the early 1960s and provides data on gross flows of skilled migrants from developing to selected receiving developed countries during the last quarter of a century. The second part examines several policy proposals made in the course of international debates in different fora. The third part reviews recent attempts by the international community to reach agreement on an integrated approach to the reverse transfer of technology."
Correspondence: J. d'Oliveira e Sousa, U.N. Conference on Trade and Development, Technology Division, Geneva, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30498 Eades, Jeremy. Prelude to an exodus: chain migration, trade, and the Yoruba in Ghana. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 199-212 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"This paper considers the relationship between chain migration, success in trade, and political marginality among Yoruba migrants from western Nigeria in northern Ghana prior to 1969....[when] the Ministry of the Interior announced...that all aliens in the country without residence permits should either obtain them in the next two weeks or leave the country....This paper reflects on theories of migration, economic activity, and the state in the light of this incident. It argues that the characteristic pattern of chain migration which took the Yoruba to Ghana not only helps account for their success in trade there, but also helps explain why they, of all the immigrant groups in Ghana, left the country the most completely and the most rapidly in the last days of 1969."
Correspondence: J. Eades, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30499 Eelens, Frank; Speckmann, J. D. Recruitment of labor migrants for the Middle East: the Sri Lankan case. International Migration Review, Vol. 24, Summer 1990. 297-322 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"This article deals with the social, economic and demographic aspects of labor migration from Sri Lanka to the Middle East. The findings are based on a survey covering 891 return migrants and 866 family members of current migrants, as well as a total of 407 nonmigrants who were interviewed as a control group. Although the elasticity of the demand for female domestic personnel is much smaller than that for male migrants, it was found that recruitment for female labor migrants has increased considerably in recent years. The enormous demand for foreign employment has led to a thriving recruitment sector and to numerous illegal activities also among authorized employment agents. Currently, prospective labor migrants have to incur huge debts to finance migration."
Correspondence: F. Eelens, Netherlands Interuniversity Demographic Institute, P.O. Box 11650, 2502 AR The Hague, Netherlands. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30500 Escobar, Agustin; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Roberts, Bryan. Migration, labour markets, and the international economy: Jalisco, Mexico, and the United States. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 42-64 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"Our focus is the contemporary patterns of migration in the west of Mexico, using data from Guadalajara, the regional centre and Mexico's second largest city....We outline the types of labour markets that are available to migrants from the west of Mexico, indicating some of the major ways in which they have been shaped by the interdependence of the Mexican and United States economies....We examine some of the factors that influence the decision to migrate, exploring how personal situations and perspectives influence reactions to the constraints on choice resulting from labour market structures. We concentrate on the move to the United States as compared with that to Guadalajara....We examine the ways in which the fit between the individual characteristics of migrants and the requirements of labour markets are mediated by life cycle and household composition."
Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30501 Federici, N. Causes of international migration. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 47-62 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
The author investigates possible determinants of international migration, using the example of Italy since the end of the nineteenth century. Aspects considered include political, ideological, and cultural conditions; labor market accessibility; and economic factors.
Correspondence: N. Federici, University of Rome, Department of Demographic Sciences, Citta Universitaria, 00100 Rome, Italy. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30502 Felderer, Bernhard. Immigration, fertility trends, and the economy. [Immigration, Geburtenentwicklung and Wirtschaft.] Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte, No. 18/89, Apr 28, 1989. 16-22 pp. Bonn, Germany, Federal Republic of. In Ger.
This article focuses on the economic consequences of immigration to the Federal Republic of Germany. The effects on economic demand, the labor market, and technological progress are discussed.
Location: New York Public Library.

56:30503 Fibbi, Rosita; Ogden, Philip E. A review of research on migration in Switzerland and the United Kingdom. [Bilan des recherches sur les migrations en Suisse et au Royaume-Uni.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1989. 147-62 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre.
Separate reviews on the current status of migration research in Switzerland and the United Kingdom are presented. The focus is on relations between migrant and native populations.
Correspondence: R. Fibbi, Institut d'Anthropologie et de Sociologie, BFSH2, 10-15 Lausanne, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30504 Findlay, Allan M.; Garrick, Lesley. Scottish emigration in the 1980s: a migration channels approach to the study of skilled international migration. Institute of British Geographers: Transactions, Vol. 15, No. 2, 1990. 177-92 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"British emigration is now dominated by skilled transient movements rather than traditional settler emigration movements. This switch requires new frameworks for migration analysis. A migration channels approach is advocated with attention focused on the roles of the internal labour markets of multi-national companies, international recruitment agencies and international skill transfers by small- and intermediate-sized companies in moulding contemporary skilled migration. The migration processes which have emerged in relation to the operation of these three channels can be differentiated in terms of migrant characteristics, the status of migration contracts and patterns of movement. The regional dimension is highlighted in this article by contrasting the experience of recent Scottish emigration with that of the South-East of England. Three data sources (the International Passenger Survey, the results of a survey questionnaire, and company case study material) are employed to illustrate the nature of Britain's main migration channels. It is argued that the three channels are responsible for a selective structuring of the British migration system."
Correspondence: A. M. Findlay, University of Glasgow, Department of Geography, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

56:30505 Fohlen, Claude. A historical view on French immigration to the United States. [Perspectives historiques sur l'immigration francaise aux Etats-Unis.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1990. 29-43 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Spa.
This is a historical overview of French migration to the United States from the seventeenth century to the present. The author discusses the spatial distribution of French migrants in the United States and their reasons for migration, and compares migration patterns from France with those of other countries.
Correspondence: C. Fohlen, 79 rue d'Agusesseau, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30506 Guillemette, Andre; Legare, Jacques. The influence of kinship on seventeenth-century immigration to Canada. Collection de Tires a Part, No. 262, [1989]. [23] pp. Universite de Montreal, Departement de Demographie: Montreal, Canada. In Eng.
The authors explore the effect of family networks on migration from France to Canada in the seventeenth century using Canadian parish registers and nominal censuses of the period. A typology of kinship linkages is drawn up, with a focus on family characteristics, the number of generations within the network, and the drawing power of family ties. The number of French immigrants returning to France is also studied to understand kinship as a retention factor.
This paper is reprinted from Continuity and Change (Cambridge, England), Vol. 4, No. 1, 1989, pp. 79-102.
Correspondence: Universite de Montreal, Departement de Demographie, Case Postale 6128, Succursale A, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada.

56:30507 Gurak, Douglas T.; Gilbertson, Greta. Household transitions in the migrations of Dominicans and Colombians to New York. Population and Development Program: 1989 Working Paper Series, No. 1.12, Oct 1989. 24, [6] pp. Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology: Ithaca, New York. In Eng.
"This paper examines the household composition of two first-generation immigrant groups in the United States: Dominicans and Colombians. The objectives of this study are to provide a detailed description of key household transitions of these migrants, and to determine the extent to which differences in background, migration, and household characteristics influence their household transitions." Findings indicate that "before migration, immigrant households tend to be complex and non-nuclear in structure. With time, both groups tend to move in with nuclear family members. The differences in the transition patterns result both from differences in the nature of the migration and from other unspecified differences related to ethnic origins and sex."
Correspondence: Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30508 Gutierrez Roldan, Hector G. Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese immigration: Chile 1860-1930. [La inmigracion espanola, italiana y portugesa: Chile 1860-1930.] Notas de Poblacion, Vol. 17, No. 48, Dec 1989. 61-79 pp. Santiago, Chile. In Spa. with sum. in Eng.
"The paper refers to the amount and some characteristics of the Spanish, Italian and Portuguese immigration to Chile during the period 1860-1930. It is compared with [movements to] Argentina, Brazil, Cuba and Uruguay....Different information sources are used and in spite of data weakness, the low preference for Chile of the European migratory flows is ratified as compared with those to Argentina....It is pointed out that the migratory flows to Latin America, in particular to Chile, are associated, on the one hand, with the favourable...European [immigration] policy in this country and on the other hand with the huge European emigration overseas during that period."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30509 Hasenau, M. Setting norms in the United Nations system: the draft convention on the protection of the rights of all migrant workers and their families in relation to ILO in standards on migrant workers. International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales, Vol. 28, No. 2, Jun 1990. 133-58 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
The author reviews the U.N.'s draft proposal concerning the rights of migrant workers and their families. "This article examines the nature and scope of obligations under the United Nations Convention and contrasts them with existing international standards. In the light of the elaboration of the U.N. Convention, the conditions of future normative activities to limit negative consequences of a proliferation of instruments and supervisory mechanisms are outlined." Consideration is given to human and trade union rights, employment, social security, living and working conditions, workers' families, expulsion, and conditions of international migration.
Correspondence: M. Hasenau, International Labour Office, 4 Route des Morillons, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30510 Hoffmann-Nowotny, Hans-Joachim. World population growth and international migration. [Weltbevolkerungswachstum und internationale Migration.] Osterreichische Zeitschrift fur Soziologie, Vol. 13, No. 3, 1988. 4-15 pp. Vienna, Austria. In Ger.
The general macro-sociological determinants of international migration are outlined, and specific conditions that can modify theoretical trends are discussed. The future of international migration is then examined, with reference to whether migration from overpopulated developing countries can compensate for population decline in developed countries.
Correspondence: H.-J. Hoffmann-Nowotny, Ernstacher 9, 8126 Zumikon, Switzerland. Location: Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, CA.

56:30511 Hubain, Claude. West Germany and its immigrants. [La Republique Federale Allemande et ses immigres.] ISBN 2-87085-119-7. 1987. 147 pp. CIACO Editeur: Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. In Fre. with sum. in Eng; Ger.
Trends concerning migrants and migration policy in West Germany are examined. The focus is on the education and housing problems migrants face and the impact of social factors, including discrimination, on these problems. Legislation and pilot programs in education are also described.
Correspondence: CIACO Editeur, Centrale d'Achats et Service d'Impression, Avenue Einstein 9, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30512 Hughey, A. M. The incomes of recent female immigrants to the United States. Social Science Quarterly, Vol. 71, No. 2, Jun 1990. 383-90 pp. Austin, Texas. In Eng.
"The incomes of females from 59 countries, who entered the United States between 1970 and 1980, are examined, using data from a special tabulation of the 1980 census. Although the immigrants are a very diverse group, English language ability and educational attainment are among the important determinants of the women's incomes. Female immigrant incomes are inversely related to male labor force participation."
Correspondence: A. M. Hughey, City University of New York, Brooklyn College, Bedford Avenue and Avenue H, Brooklyn, NY 11210. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

56:30513 Huguet, J. W. International labour migration from the ESCAP region. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 93-108 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"The present chapter is based primarily on the results of a project on international migration policy [in the ESCAP region] carried out in 1984 and 1985 by the Population Division of ESCAP with financial support from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA)." Sections are included on the dimensions of international labor migration in Asia and the Pacific, problems of measurement and data collection, and the economic and social impact of labor migration.
Correspondence: J. W. Huguet, U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Population Division, United Nations Building, Rajadamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30514 Jones, Philip N. Recent ethnic German migration from Eastern Europe to the Federal Republic. Geography, Vol. 75, Pt. 3, No. 328, Jul 1990. 249-52 pp. Sheffield, England. In Eng.
The author examines recent trends in the migration of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe and the USSR to West Germany. Aspects considered include the historical origins of the ethnic German population, the scale of recent movement, reasons for emigration, and the German government's commitment to the well-being and integration of migrants.
Correspondence: P. N. Jones, University of Hull, Cottingham Road, Hull HU6 7RX, England. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

56:30515 Jones, Philip N. West Germany's declining guestworker population: spatial change and economic trends in the 1980s. Regional Studies, Vol. 24, No. 3, Jun 1990. 223-33 pp. New York, New York/Cambridge, England. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Ger.
The author examines trends in labor migration to West Germany during the 1980s, with an emphasis on the spatial distribution of migrants. Urban and rural differentials in distribution and the effcts of rising unemployment on labor migration are discussed. Information is included on migrants' population size and their countries of origin.
Correspondence: P. N. Jones, University of Hull, Department of Geography, Cottingham Road, Hull HU6 7RX, England. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

56:30516 Kahn, Rene. Migrants and work in Europe. Proceedings of a meeting organized by the European Centre "Work and Society" (ECWS), Maastricht, December 3-5, 1987. [Migrants et travail en Europe. Compte-rendu du colloque organise par le Centre Europeen "Travail et Societe" (ECWS), Maastricht, 3-5 decembre 1987.] L'Europe Plurielle, No. 1, ISBN 90-5201-012-9. 1989. 129 pp. Presses Interuniversitaires Europeennes: Maastricht, Netherlands. Distributed by Parsifal, rue de Faubourg Poissoniere 96, 75010 Paris, France. In Fre.
These are the proceedings of a conference on labor migration in Europe held in Maastricht, the Netherlands, in 1987. The first part examines two contrasting themes: the resurgence of the concept of national sovereignty concerning the control of the labor force, and the development of the concept of free mobility of labor within the European Community. The second part considers a number of problems associated with labor migration, including those associated with moving, integrating into the labor force, social integration, and discrimination. The third and final part discusses the implications of the 1992 legislation on migration flows within the Community and in particular the various ways its implementation might affect the status of migrants.
Location: Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, Paris, France.

56:30517 Kandil, M.; Metwally, M. F. The impact of migrants' remittances on the Egyptian economy. International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales, Vol. 28, No. 2, Jun 1990. 159-80 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the impact of the large remittances made by Egyptian migrants to their home country on the Egyptian economy. In order to study this impact, we use the implications of the standard Keynesian model. We estimated the structural equations of the model using annual data for the Egyptian economy over the period from 1970 to 1984....The results suggest that remittances have had a strong positive impact on GNP in Egypt." The authors note that remittances especially affect private consumption spending. Policy implications concerning labor migration are discussed.
Correspondence: M. Kandil, Southern Illinois University, Department of Economics, Carbondale, IL 62901. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30518 Kritz, Mary M.; Caces, Fe. Science and technology transfers and migration flows. Population and Development Program Working Paper Series, No. 1.02, 1989. 21, [7] pp. Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology: Ithaca, New York. In Eng.
The relationship between science and technology (S&T) capacity, international migration, and economic development in developed and developing countries is examined. "It appears that the level of existing S&T capacity in a country shapes the content and medium of S&T transfers, as well as the direction of the population movements that occur. While developed countries send skilled migrants to developing countries, they receive foreign students from them. Moreover, a country's development timetable and its income levels will determine the extent to which investments can be made in technology."
Correspondence: Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30519 Larkin, Mary A. Report: Inter-American Conference on Migration Trends and Policies, February 4-6, 1986. [Informe: Conferencia Inter-Americana sobre las Direcciones y Politicas Migratorias, 4-6 febrero del 1986.] 1988. ix, 181 pp. Georgetown University, Center for Immigration Policy and Refugee Assistance: Washington, D.C. In Spa.
This is a report on the Inter-American Conference on Migration Trends and Policies, held in Washington, D.C., in 1986. The aim of the conference was to examine initiatives for international cooperation in solving migration problems. Sections are included on the search for permanent solutions for refugees in Central America; the changing demand for foreign labor and its impact on the sending countries; development policies and their effect on emigration; and trends and political implications of return migration.
Correspondence: Georgetown University, Center for Immigration Policy and Refugee Assistance, P.O. Box 2298, Hoya Station, Washington, D.C. 20057. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30520 Lebon, Andre. An evaluation of immigration flows in France in 1988. [Evaluation des flux d'immigration en France en 1988.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1989. 121-31 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre.
Legal immigration in metropolitan France in 1988 is analyzed. A distinction is made between permanent and temporary migrants.
Correspondence: A. Lebon, Ministere de la Solidarite, de la Sante et de la Protection Sociale, Direction de la Population des Migrations, 1 place Fontenoy, 75007 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30521 Lohrmann, Reinhard. Irregular migration: an emerging issue in developing countries. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 129-40 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
The author discusses the increasing attention being paid to irregular, or clandestine, migration in developing countries, with a focus on the impact of changes in the demand for labor, political instability, and natural disasters. Trends in Africa, Asia, and Latin America are compared.
Correspondence: R. Lohrmann, Intergovernmental Committee for Migration, Geneva, Switzerland. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30522 Mascarenhas-Keyes, Stella. Death notices and dispersal: international migration among Catholic Goans. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 82-98 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
International migration among the Catholic population of Goa, India, is analyzed, with a focus on communication patterns and migrants' decision making. "I hope to demonstrate in this paper that...proactivity [defined here as the anticipation of and planning for events] played an important role in the global dispersion of Catholic Goans....In order to do this, the first section briefly describes some aspects of Portuguese colonialism, and the conditions in Goa which led to international migration. The second section examines how various labour markets arose outside Goa and the proactive mechanisms adopted by Catholic Goans to capitalize on new and recurring job opportunities. The third section examines the development and maintenance of international networks and their role in the organization of migration."
Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30523 Mundende, D. Chongo. The brain drain and developing countries. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 183-95 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"As brain drain migration [has] created a great deal of controversy concerning its impact on developing countries, this chapter will examine and assess appropriate research during the last few decades." Aspects considered include causes and consequences of brain drain; possible solutions; and preventive, restrictive, restorative, and compensatory measures to deal with the problem.
Correspondence: D. C. Mundende, Michigan State University, Department of Geography, East Lansing, MI 48824. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30524 Ostby, Lars. International migration to Norway, 1988: report for the Continuous Reporting System on Migration of OECD (SOPEMI). Rapporter fra Statistisk Sentralbyra, No. 90/8, ISBN 82-537-2928-6. 1990. 66 pp. Statistisk Sentralbyra: Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norway. In Eng. with sum. in Nor.
This is a report on international migration to and from Norway compiled by the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway for the November 1989 meeting of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Data are included for the period 1973-1988 concerning migrant population size and country of origin, native and migrant departures and returns, intermarriage, migrant fertility trends, migrant labor force participation, migration policy, and return migration.
Correspondence: Statistisk Sentralbyra, P.B. 8131 Dep., Oslo 1, Norway. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30525 Pellegrino, A. Colombian immigrants in Venezuela. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 301-22 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
The situation of illegal Colombian immigrants in Venezuela is examined. Aspects considered include the lack of legal and policy definitions of illegal migrants, methods of estimating the number of Colombians in Venezuela, characteristics of migrants, features of Colombian employment and integration, and determinants of Colombian migration.
Correspondence: A. Pellegrino, Universidad Catolica Andres Bello, Urb. Montalban La Vega, Apdo. 29068, Caracas 1021, Venezuela. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30526 Poston, Dudley L.; Yu, Mei-Yu. The distribution of the overseas Chinese in the contemporary world. Population and Development Program: 1989 Working Paper Series, No. 1.03, 1989. 54 pp. Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology: Ithaca, New York. In Eng.
The distribution of overseas Chinese throughout the contemporary world is studied. The term "overseas Chinese" refers to persons of Chinese ancestry living outside China and Taiwan. The authors examine the processes of international migration, mortality, and fertility and assess their influence on the distribution patterns of the overseas Chinese population.
Correspondence: Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30527 Price, Charles A. Long-term immigration and emigration: its contribution to the developing world, with particular reference to movement between Australia and Asia and the Pacific. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 143-58 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"Though the focus of this chapter is on long-term [Australian] migration to and from developing countries, reference will also be made to the general pool of long-term migrants, and to comparable or contrasting movements between developed countries." Particular emphasis is on movements between Australia and countries of the Asia-Pacific region. Aspects considered include duration of stay, sex and age distribution, occupational category, and regional distribution.
Correspondence: C. A. Price, Australian National University, Department of Demography, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30528 Richmond, Anthony H.; Lam, Lawrence; Mata, Fernando; Wong, Lloyd. Some consequences of third world migration to Canada. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 335-59 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
The authors investigate the consequences of migration from developing countries to Canada. They analyze the impact on migrants, with a focus on economic and social adaptation of immigrants of specific nationalities, and consider the political, social, and economic effects on Canada and the sending countries.
Correspondence: A. H. Richmond, York University, Department of Sociology, 4700 Keele Street, North York, Ontario M3J 1P3, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30529 Salt, John; Findlay, Allan. International migration of highly-skilled manpower: theoretical and developmental issues. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 159-80 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"This chapter is concerned with two aspects of the migration of the highly skilled: developing an appropriate explanatory theoretical framework and assessing the impact on development of skill transfers through international migration. Following general observations on the migration of highly-skilled persons, a theoretical framework is proposed based on a system which addresses the new international spatial division of labour, the nature of careers, the role of internal labour markets and the lubrication provided by recruitment and relocation agencies. This is followed by new empirical evidence from U.S.-based examples on the scale of relocation within transnational corporations (TNCs). The development impacts of the migration of the highly skilled are then considered...."
Correspondence: J. Salt, University College, Department of Geography, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30530 Samha, M. The impact of migratory flows on population changes in Jordan: a Middle Eastern case study. International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales, Vol. 28, No. 2, Jun 1990. 215-28 pp. Geneva, Switzerland. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
The impact of migration into and out of Jordan on population changes from 1949 to the present is examined. The author briefly discusses population growth, spatial distribution, urban growth, economic conditions, and remittances.
Correspondence: M. Samha, University of Jordan, Department of Demography, Amman, Jordan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30531 Siegel, Mark A.; Jacobs, Nancy R.; Von Brook, Patricia A. Immigration and illegal aliens: burden or blessing? Information Series on Current Topics, ISBN 0-936474-95-5. 1989. 112 pp. Information Plus: Wylie, Texas. In Eng.
This is an overview of the issues surrounding migration to the United States and the prescence of illegal aliens. Separate chapters cover the history of immigration to the United States, current rates and statistics, recent immigration laws, refugees, illegal aliens, Mexican emigration, and Southeast Asian migrants. Data are from official and other published sources.
Correspondence: Information Plus, 2812 Exchange Street, Wylie, TX 75098. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30532 Stahl, Charles W. Overview: economic perspectives. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 361-89 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"The first part [of this chapter] contains two sections. The first is concerned with the output and employment consequences of labour emigration, the second focuses on major issues pertaining to the impact of remittances on poor, labour-sending countries. The second part addresses the developmental impact of immigration on poor countries. Three types of immigration will be considered: the return of citizen workers from abroad, the immigration of professional transient workers, and the influx of refugees."
Correspondence: C. W. Stahl, University of Newcastle, Department of Economics, Newcastle NSW 2308, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30533 Taylor, John. The reorganization of mine labor recruitment in Southern Africa: evidence from Botswana. International Migration Review, Vol. 24, Summer 1990. 250-72 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"The past decade has been one of unprecedented change in the pattern and organization of mine labor recruitment in Southern Africa. Using detailed data on recruitment patterns in Botswana, this article supports the view that recent changes have initiated a self-sustaining trend whereby certain flows of foreign labor into South Africa will decline unabated into the foreseeable future. This results from a shift in general recruiting policy from one of encouraging external migrant labor flows--by expanding recruitment networks and employing a variable and transient workforce--to one of retrenchment and labor stabilization biased in favor of internalized labor supplies."
Correspondence: J. Taylor, Australian National University, GPO 4, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30534 Tucker, Robert W.; Keely, Charles B.; Wrigley, Linda. Immigration and U.S. foreign policy. ISBN 0-8133-7853-2. LC 89-27486. 1990. viii, 229 pp. Westview Press: Boulder, Colorado/Oxford, England. In Eng.
This is a collection of papers by various authors on "the relationship between immigration and foreign policy in the United States. The contributors first reexamine the consequences of the nineteenth-century and interwar migrations and then explore the origins of U.S. refugee policy and refugee migration since World War II. Focusing on the shift from European to Latin and Asian countries as the principal sources of immigrants in the postwar period, the contributors weigh the consequences for U.S. foreign policy goals of the dramatic change in ethnic balance."
Correspondence: Westview Press, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30535 Van Arsdol, Maurice D. Overview: sociological and related issues. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 391-400 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
The author reviews the social impacts of international migration. Theoretical, measurement, and policy issues are outlined. Social aspects of temporary, clandestine, transient, permanent, refugee, and return migratory movements are considered.
Correspondence: M. D. Van Arsdol, University of Southern California, Population Research Laboratory, University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90089. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30536 Voisard, Jacques. A report on the improvement of information concerning immigration. [Rapport sur l'amelioration de la connaissance en matiere d'immigration.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1989. 103-19 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre.
This is a review of the current availability and quality of data and research on immigration in France. The need for improvement in information concerning immigration is stressed, as is the need to distribute such information to the relevant authorities. The recommendations include the creation of both a national institute with responsibility for immigration information and a foundation to undertake work on immigration falling outside governmental responsibility.
Correspondence: J. Voisard, Comite de Decentralisation, Membre du Haut Comite a l'Integration, 23 avenue Franklin Roosevelt, 75008 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30537 Wakabayashi, Keiko. "Blind movement" of the Chinese population: background for the recent influx of Chinese working students and disguised refugees in Japan. Jinko Mondai Kenkyu/Journal of Population Problems, Vol. 46, No. 1, Apr 1990. 35-50 pp. Tokyo, Japan. In Jpn. with sum. in Eng.
The influx of migrants from China to Japan during 1989 is examined. The author focuses on socioeconomic and demographic aspects such as unemployment, out-migration of ex-farmers, and problems with the residential registration system that have contributed to the increase in Chinese migration to Japan.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30538 Waldorf, B. S.; Esparza, A.; Huff, J. O. A behavioral model of international labor and nonlabor migration: the case of Turkish movements to West Germany, 1960-1986. Environment and Planning A, Vol. 22, No. 7, Jul 1990. 961-73 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"In this paper behavioral models of international labor and nonlabor migration are presented. The models are based on the concept of chain migration, where the immigrant stock, differentiated by the duration of stay, induces and directs future migration flows. Three roles of the immigrant stock in inducing the inflow of potential migrants are identified: provider of assimilation aid; transmitter of information; and source of family reunification. Operationalized versions of the models are empirically tested for Turkish labor and nonlabor migration to West Germany, 1960-86. The results support the importance of information for labor migrants, and reunification ties for nonlabor migrants."
Correspondence: B. S. Waldorf, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton, NJ 08544. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

56:30539 Zlotnik, Hania. International migration policies and the status of female migrants. International Migration Review, Vol. 24, Summer 1990. 372-81 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
The author reports on a meeting that was sponsored by the U.N. Population Council and the University of Pisa and held in March 1990 in San Minato, Italy, on international migration policies and female migrant status. The conference dealt with such topics as the impact of female status on migration selectivity, the effect of acculturation on the roles and status of migrant women, the status of female migrants as compared to that of native women, and returning female migrants.
Correspondence: H. Zlotnik, U.N. Population Division, Population and Development Section, 220 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.3. Internal Migration

Studies concerned with internal migration.

56:30540 Adi, Wijaya. The application of an optimal control model in the study of migration. [Penerapan model terkendali pada studi migrasi.] Majalah Demografi Indonesia/Indonesian Journal of Demography, Vol. 16, No. 32, Dec 1989. vii, 39-47 pp. Jakarta, Indonesia. In Ind. with sum. in Eng.
"An optimal control model has been applied in the study of migration among regions [in Indonesia. The author finds that the] population in Indonesia is not well distributed: more than half...live in Java. Since migration can mean reducing or increasing the total population in a region, so a [better] distribution of the population will overcome the problem, [by relocating the population] to a certain region (such as Irian Jaya, Kalimantan and others)."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30541 Davenport, David P. Population persistence and migration in rural New York, 1855-1860. Garland Studies in Historical Demography, ISBN 0-8240-3769-3. LC 89-23274. 1989. xi, 249 pp. Garland Publishing: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"This study examines population persistence and out-migration from a typical rural area of New York. The entire population of six representative towns in Schoharie County as enumerated in the state census of 1855 constitutes the initial sample....Population change in America during the 1800s is [first] examined....Three inter-related topics are reviewed: frontier settlement, urbanization, and depopulation and emigration from rural areas of the northeastern United States. The sample population and the procedures used to trace these people are discussed...[and] a model of hypothesized [socioeconomic and demographic] differentials between migrants and non-migrants is presented and tested....The destinations of out-migrants are examined and hypothesized differentials between partial displacement migrants and total displacement migrants and between urbanward migrants and migrants to rural places are tested...."
Correspondence: Garland Publishing, 136 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30542 Gose, Ernie; Paul, Chris. The impact of unemployment insurance benefits on the probability of migration of the unemployed. Journal of Regional Science, Vol. 30, No. 3, Aug 1990. 349-58 pp. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In Eng.
"By ignoring individual unemployment compensation benefits and conditions of job termination, past migration research has concluded that personal unemployment doubles the likelihood of interstate labor-force migration. Findings from the present study indicate that aggregating the unemployed, without adjusting for these two factors, overstates the probability of migration for the involuntarily unemployed benefit recipient and understates the likelihood of migration for the voluntarily unemployed benefit recipient. The results suggest that federal discretionary unemployment-compensation programs, which are implemented during recessionary periods, likely serve to retard out-migration of those who are involuntarily unemployed." Data are from a 1982 sample of unemployed U.S. workers.
Correspondence: E. Goss, University of Southern Mississippi, College of Business Administration, Management Information Systems, Southern Station, Box 5001, Hattiesburg, MS 39406. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

56:30543 Liaw, Kao-Lee. Joint effects of personal factors and ecological variables on the interprovincial migration pattern of young adults in Canada: a nested logit analysis. Geographical Analysis, Vol. 22, No. 3, Jul 1990. 189-208 pp. Columbus, Ohio. In Eng.
"This paper applies a nested logit model to the 1981 census micro data to study the joint effects of personal factors (sex, mother tongue, nativity, education, and marital status) and ecological variables on the 1976-1981 interprovincial migration pattern of young adults in Canada. In multivariate contexts, personal factors not only are of paramount importance in explaining the departure process but also have significant interactions with ecological variables in determining the destination choice pattern."
Correspondence: K.-L. Liaw, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

56:30544 Madden, Moss; Trigg, Andrew B. Interregional migration in an extended input-output model. International Regional Science Review, Vol. 13, No. 1-2, 1990. 65-85 pp. Morgantown, West Virginia. In Eng.
"This article develops a two-region version of an extended input-output model that disaggregates consumption among employed, unemployed, and inmigrant households, and which explicitly models the influx into a region of migrants to take up a proportion of any jobs created in the regional economy. The model is empirically tested using real data for the Scotland (UK) regions of Strathclyde and Rest-of-Scotland. Sets of interregional economic, demographic, demo-economic, and econo-demographic multipliers are developed and discussed, and the effects of a range of economic and demographic impacts are modeled. The circumstances under which Hawkins-Simon conditions for non-negativity are breached are identified, and the limits of the model discussed."
Correspondence: M. Madden, University of Liverpool, Department of Civic Design, Liverpool L69 3BX, England. Location: Princeton University Library (UES).

56:30545 Nabi, A. K. M. Nurun. Dynamics of internal migration in Bangladesh. Population Research Laboratory Discussion Paper, No. 64, Apr 1990. 32 pp. University of Alberta, Department of Sociology, Population Research Laboratory: Edmonton, Canada. In Eng.
"Inter-regional net migration rates for Bangladesh have been estimated using the available data set from the 1974 and 1981 census reports. A multiple regression model of internal migration in Bangladesh has failed to support the argument that internal migratory flows are determined by high population density. The development of the agrarian social structure of this country is rooted in the historical evolution of the land tenure system. The analysis indicates a tentative support to the argument that the unequal hierarchical relations of people to the land in the country condition the process by which migration takes place."
Correspondence: University of Alberta, Department of Sociology, Population Research Laboratory, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2H4, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30546 Quintanilla, Ernesto. Migrant workers in the metropolitan area of Monterrey. [Trabajadores migrantes en el area metropolitana de Monterrey.] Estudios Demograficos y Urbanos, Vol. 4, No. 3, Sep-Dec 1989. 495-519, 626 pp. Mexico City, Mexico. In Spa. with sum. in Eng.
"In this article, an analysis is made of evidence regarding the metropolitan area of Monterrey, [Mexico]....[A] study carried out in 1965 is used as a point of reference, and information is analyzed for 1980 and 1983. In the first section of this article, a brief summary is provided of some of the recent contributions that have been made to the study of the profitability of internal migration. The second part is devoted to an analysis of the 1980 and 1983 surveys, focussing on the features distinguishing recent migratory workers and the rest of the work force...and on the factors determining income, with special interest in the category of migrants....Lastly, a summary of the main findings is presented."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30547 Rakowski, Witold. Migration of population of Suwalskie voivodship until 1978 and its impact on the current shaping of demographic potential. [Migracje ludnosci wojewodztwa suwalskiego do 1978 r. i ich wplyw na wspolczesne ksztaltowanie sie potencjalu demograficznego.] Biuletyn IGS, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1987. 31-70, 264-6, 277-8 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Pol. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
The author examines in-migration and out-migration of Suwalskie voivodship, Poland, with a focus on the different patterns within the urban and rural areas of the region. The places of origin of the current inhabitants of Suwalskie are considered.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30548 Rasmussen, David W.; Fournier, Gary M.; Charity, Douglas A. The impact of cost of living differentials on migration of elderly people to Florida. Review of Regional Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2, Spring 1989. 48-54 pp. Clemson, South Carolina. In Eng.
"In this paper the determinants of [the] migration [of elderly people] are analyzed with special reference to how cost of living influences the selection of a destination by migrating elderly persons (55 and over) during 1975-1980 [in the United States]. The results of the study support the hypothesis that cost of living differentials provide the elderly an incentive to move that is not unlike the incentive wage differentials provide members of the labor force. The results indicate that cost of living differentials among groups of Florida counties have a major impact on the migration decisions of elderly households."
Correspondence: D. W. Rasmussen, Florida State University, Department of Economics and Policy Sciences, Tallahassee, FL 32306. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

56:30549 Reeder, Richard J.; Glasgow, Nina L. The economic development consequences of growing elderly populations in nonmetro counties. Population and Development Program Working Paper Series, No. 1.10, 1989. 37, [12] pp. Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology: Ithaca, New York. In Eng.
"In this paper, county level data [for the United States] will be used to examine socioeconomic and fiscal conditions in retirement inmigration counties nationwide to provide insights on the validity of [several] assumptions concerning retirement communities: their advantages and their disadvantages. Although the focus of the paper is on nonmetropolitan retirement counties, we will also examine conditions in 'aging-in-place' counties, nonmetro counties that already have a high percentage of elderly but are not characterized by inmigration of elderly."
Correspondence: Cornell University, Department of Rural Sociology, 134 Warren Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-7801. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30550 Rosenwaike, Ira. Migration patterns of the elderly: the case of the American Jewish population. Journal of Aging and Judaism, Vol. 3, No. 3, Spring 1989. 116-27 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"This article examines the growing concentration of the elderly Jewish population of the U.S. in one metropolitan region of the Sun Belt. The principal data sources used are U.S. Census counts of the population with a Yiddish mother tongue or speaking Yiddish at home, as well as 1980 data on the population of Russian ancestry. The limitations of these measures are discussed and data from local community surveys also are presented. The data show that relocation of the elderly from the North, especially to South Florida, has been occurring since the 1950s and accelerated during the 1970s. The need for further study, which may document the migration patterns of elderly members of diverse religions and ethnic groups, is pointed out."
Correspondence: I. Rosenwaike, University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Social Work, 3701 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30551 Thailand. National Statistical Office (Bangkok, Thailand). Survey of migration into Chon Buri Province, 1987. Pub. Order No. E-SuR-Mign-No. 2-89. [1989]. 53 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng; Tha.
These are the results of a survey conducted in 1987 among 498 households with migrants in Chon Buri Province, Thailand. Data are provided on age, sex, and educational status of in-migrants; place of previous residence, expected duration of residence, and reason for migration; and occupation before and after migration.
Correspondence: National Statistical Office, Larn Luang Road, Bangkok 10100, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30552 Thailand. National Statistical Office (Bangkok, Thailand). Survey of migration into Nakorn Ratchasima Province, 1987. Pub. Order No. E-SuR-Mign-No. 1-89. [1989]. 53 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng; Tha.
These are the results of the 1987 survey of migration into Nakorn Ratchasima Province of Thailand. A statement of survey objectives and procedures is provided, followed by a chapter describing the survey and enumeration period, household characteristics, reasons for migration, occupation, educational status, and intention to migrate in the future. An appendix of statistical tables is included.
Correspondence: National Statistical Office, Larn Luang Road Bangkok 10100, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30553 Thailand. National Statistical Office (Bangkok, Thailand). Survey of migration into Songkhla Province, 1987. Pub. Order No. E-Sur-Mign-No. 3-89. [1989]. 52 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng; Tha.
These are the results of a 1987 survey of 795 households with migrants in Songkhla Province, Thailand. Data are presented on age, sex, and educational status of in-migrants; place of previous residence, duration of residence, and reason for migrating; and occupation before and after migrating.
Correspondence: National Statistical Office, Larn Luang Road, Bangkok 10100, Thailand. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30554 Uchino, Sumiko. Trends and characteristics of internal migration in postwar Japan. Jinko Mondai Kenkyu/Journal of Population Problems, Vol. 46, No. 1, Apr 1990. 16-34 pp. Tokyo, Japan. In Jpn. with sum. in Eng.
Internal migration patterns in Japan are examined for the period 1950-1980. Changes in regional migration, rural-urban migration, out-migration from urban areas, and the spatial distribution of the population are discussed. Preferences for living in various regions are also studied.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30555 Ward, R. Gerard. Contract labor recruitment from the Highlands of Papua New Guinea, 1950-1974. International Migration Review, Vol. 24, Summer 1990. 273-96 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
The author examines the social, economic, and political context surrounding a contract labor system implemented in Papua New Guinea that was begun in the 1950s. "In its 25 years of operation the Highland Labour Scheme provided the mechanism whereby some 100,000 men migrated temporarily from their highland homes to work in the coastal districts of Papua New Guinea. This was a circular migration within their own country, for labor purposes only. The men did not take their families with them, and there was no element of redistribution of population from a highly populated area as there has been in migration schemes in the adjoining areas of Southeast Asia...."
Correspondence: R. G. Ward, Australian National University, GPO 4, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30556 Watanabe, Machiko. Internal migration and regional economic differentials in postwar Japan. Jinkogaku Kenkyu/Journal of Population Studies, No. 12, May 1989. 11-24 pp. Tokyo, Japan. In Jpn. with sum. in Eng.
The author considers the impact of economic growth on regional differences in internal migration in Japan since World War II. "During the rapid economic growth period from the latter half of the 1950s to an early part of the 1970s, the number of migrants to metropolitan areas from other areas increased continuously. During the slow economic growth period from an early part of the 1970s to the present, however, the volume of internal migration has been decreasing mainly because of the decline in the number of in-migrants to metropolitan areas."
Location: Princeton University Library (Gest).

H.4. Settlement and Resettlement

Studies on international and internal settlement and resettlement, including programs concerned with refugees and their settlement and with forced migrations.

56:30557 Adepoju, A. The consequences of influx of refugees for countries of asylum in Africa. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 219-34 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"This chapter examines the consequences of refugee influx for major countries of asylum in Africa....Though [refugees] are regarded primarily as an African problem, their reception has taxed available resources of asylum countries which not only provide land for settlement but in some cases avail refugees of the option of naturalisation in situations where repatriation appears unlikely. Because refugees originate and relocate within the continent, long-term solutions have to be pursued as part of the continent's economic/demographic condition."
Correspondence: A. Adepoju, University of Lagos, Research and Advisory Services Unit, Lagos, Nigeria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30558 Guillon, Michelle. Refugees and immigrants from Eastern Europe. [Refugies et immigres d'Europe de l'Est.] Revue Europeenne des Migrations Internationales, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1989. 133-8 pp. Poitiers, France. In Fre.
Trends in emigration from Eastern Europe since 1945 are reviewed. The focus is on refugees fleeing to West Germany.
Correspondence: M. Guillon, STRATES, CNRS/Universite de Paris I Geographie, 27 avenue de Bretagne, 91170 Viry-Chatillon, Paris. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30559 Khasiani, Shanyisa A. The impact of refugees in receiving countries in Africa: the cases of refugee women and refugee professionals. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 235-48 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
The author examines the impact of refugees on receiving countries in Africa, with a focus on the situation of refugee women and professionals. Efforts made to facilitate the assimilation of refugees are described. "Limited resources lead to the establishment of inadequate and often inappropriate integration programmes which marginalise able-bodied refugee women and highly-skilled refugee professionals....The most important contribution made by refugee-producing African countries relates to amnesty laws for their nationals in exile to return home, including refugee women and refugee professionals. Another activity has been the adoption of regional legal instruments intended to reduce the refugee problem."
Correspondence: S. A. Khasiani, University of Nairobi, Population Studies and Research Institute, Nsukka, Anambra State, Nigeria. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30560 Piesowicz, Kazimierz. Major migratory movements, 1945-1950, Part II. [Wielkie ruchy migracyjne w latach 1945-1950, Czesc II.] Studia Demograficzne, No. 2/96, 1989. 65-109 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Pol. with sum. in Eng; Rus.
The author analyzes trends in international migration from 1945 to 1950 in Polish territories regained after World War II. The displacement of the population, resettlement patterns, and return migration are considered. The impact of persons of Polish nationality and migrants from other countries on the sex and age distribution of these regions in 1950 is examined.
For Part I of this study, published in 1988, see 55:20510.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30561 Rybakovskii, L. L. The population in the Far East in the last 150 years. [Naselenie dal'nego vostoka za 150 let.] ISBN 5-02-013370-1. 1990. 168 pp. Nauka: Moscow, USSR. In Rus.
The author examines the process of settlement in the Russian and Soviet Far East over the past 150 years using original historical sources. Aspects considered include the character and form of the settlement process in the new territories, the specificity of the process for different time periods, and problems of migration policy.
Correspondence: Nauka, Profsoyuznaya ul. 90, 117864 GSP-7, Moscow, USSR. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.5. Temporary Migration

Migration, both internal and international, in which the stay is temporary. Includes return migration, transit migration, commuting, and seasonal migration.

56:30562 Domenach, H.; Picouet, M. Typologies and the likelihood of reversible migration. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 37-45 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"In considering the likelihood of reversibility of migration, we have underlined new characteristics of actual mobility, in particular the use of several residences, the extension of life spaces and the introduction of sequences of unpredictable duration in routes taken. The dichotomy used until now, between permanent and temporary moves, did not adequately reveal the diversity of migratory patterns and particularly the transition from one type of migration to another in the evolution of societies. In dealing with the concept of reversibility one sees emerging modes of movement not found in the classical typologies."
Correspondence: H. Domenach, Office de la Recherche Scientifique et Technique d'Outre-Mer, 24 rue Bayard, 75008 Paris, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30563 Lockwood, Victoria S. Development and return migration to rural French Polynesia. International Migration Review, Vol. 24, Summer 1990. 347-71 pp. Staten Island, New York. In Eng.
"In this article, a recent trend towards return migration to outer island French Polynesia is examined. Following a discussion of massive rural to urban migration throughout island Oceania, the regional and international factors responsible for reversing population movements in this French Territory are discussed. Finally, the impact of return migration on Tubuai, a rapidly developing outer island, is assessed specifically analyzing the manner in which returnees are reintegrated socially and economically into rural community life. The article concludes that returnees are development-oriented, but that increasing population growth in a context of fundamentally limited rural resources is not an economically viable process in the long term."
Correspondence: V. S. Lockwood, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30564 Marx, Emanuel. Labour migrants with a secure base: Bedouin of South Sinai. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 148-64 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"I argue that one of the outstanding features of labour migration is that in the long run, the cash income plays only a limited role in the economy. For labour migration takes place in conditions where employment is insecure, so that many efforts are made to provide greater economic security....I concentrated on a number of labour migrants and their households, followed their movements wherever they led, and explored their social interactions over an extended period. These events took place against a background of changing political, economic, and ecological conditions....The population studied were [the] Bedouin of South Sinai [in Egypt]."
Correspondence: E. Marx, Tel Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, 69 978 Tel Aviv, Israel. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30565 Perez-Itriago, A.; Guendelman, S. Role models and parallel lives: Mexican migrant women return home. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 269-86 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"This chapter...focuses on the role of women in [return migration], specifically the experiences of seasonal workers who travel back and forth between Mexico and the United States, their processes of adjustment once they return and their influence on the home community."
Correspondence: A. Perez-Itriago, University of California, School of Public Health, Berkeley, CA 94720. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30566 Seccombe, I. J.; Findlay, A. M. The consequences of temporary emigration and remittance expenditure for rural and urban settlements: evidence from Jordan. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 109-25 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"The paper seeks to assess the extent to which temporary labour emigration promotes new regional disparities and new patterns of population redistribution. This is done by comparing two independent household surveys conducted at opposite ends of the settlement continuum, one in the village of Sammu' in northwest Jordan and the other in Marka, a suburb of the Jordanian capital, Amman....The results of the two surveys discussed in this paper reinforce the argument that international migration is associated with non-productive investment of remittances in consumer goods and in the construction sector."
Correspondence: I. J. Seccombe, University of Durham, Centre for Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, Old Shire Hall, Durham DH1 3HP, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30567 Spiegel, Andrew. Dispersing dependants: a response to the exigencies of labour migration in rural Transkei. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 113-29 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
The author examines the ways in which the dependents of migratory workers in South Africa respond to the general income insecurity that surrounds labor migration. "This paper considers the movement of people from one household to another. The practice of placing children in domestic groups other than those of their parents is examined as a response to the absence of children's guardians. The paper also looks at the ways in which people in a village in the Matatiele district of the Transkei bantustan deal with the exigencies of loss of a remittance income, considering how changes in household compositions over a two-year period are, at least in part, attributable to circumstances experienced by migrants in the labour market....The paper concludes by examining some of these problems, considering the implications of migration and changed residence for the individual's jural status."
Correspondence: A. Spiegel, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondelbosch 7700, South Africa. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30568 Thomas-Hope, E. M.; Nutter, R. D. Occupation and status in the ideology of Caribbean return migration. In: The impact of international migration on developing countries, edited by Reginald Appleyard. 1989. 287-300 pp. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD], Development Centre: Paris, France. In Eng.
"The Caribbean migration process supports, and is supported by, a wider system of social values which form the basis of a distinctive migration ideology. This ideology contains judgements not only about the meaning of migration itself, but also about wider social issues, such as what constitutes status or success and the goals of each particular social grouping. Return migration of the type discussed in our study of Kingston, Jamaica, has important implications for the overall migration process. Of foremost importance is its role in strengthening an ideology that combines a system of inherited values (in this case regarding the meaning of education) with distinct social judgements of worth or esteem."
Correspondence: E. M. Thomas-Hope, University of Liverpool, Department of Geography, POB 147, Liverpool L69 3BX, England. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30569 Weller, Robert H.; Serow, William J.; Wieser, Kevin. Return migration and metropolitan-nonmetropolitan population composition. Population and Environment, Vol. 11, No. 4, Summer 1990. 273-84 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"This paper examines the extent to which female 'return migrants' to Puerto Rico return to their area of birth or to a different area, thereby contributing to a redistribution of the island's population, and the extent to which those who do return to their area of birth have different socioeconomic characteristics than those who return to a different area....This study shows that Puerto Rican females ages 15-49 years who migrate back to their municipio of birth after having migrated from Puerto Rico to the United States tend to have lower socioeconomic characteristics than comparably aged females who migrate back to another municipio especially when the area of return is metropolitan....Despite the high volume of return migration to Puerto Rico, it does not contribute substantially to a redistribution of the island's population from nonmetropolitan to metropolitan areas."
Correspondence: R. H. Weller, Florida State University, Center for the Study of Population, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4063. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

H.6. Rural-Urban Migration

Migration from rural to urban areas (the rural exodus), both internal and international. Reverse or turnaround migration is also included.

56:30570 Amis, Philip. Migration, urban poverty, and the housing market: the Nairobi case. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 249-68 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"The aim of this paper is to show the complexity of the relationship between rural-urban migration and the creation of urban problems....It questions the common assumption that urban problems are partly the result of too many individuals migrating to the city, and instead considers the importance of the labour market, and of changes in methods of obtaining housing, i.e. entitlement relations, in a situation of declining urban incomes." The author uses Nairobi, Kenya, as an example. Findings indicate that it is the urban wage structure and not the rate of migration that is the main determinant of urban problems.
Correspondence: P. Amis, University of Bradford, Project Planning Centre, Bradford, West Yorkshire BD7 1DP, England. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30571 Anderson, William P.; Papageorgiou, Yorgos Y. Metropolitan and nonmetropolitan population trends in Canada 1966-1982: 1. Net migration. QSEP Research Report, No. 258, Nov 1989. 31 pp. McMaster University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Program for Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population: Hamilton, Canada. In Eng.
"This is the first of two articles dealing with broad population movements within and between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas in Canada during the recent past. Here we focus on net migration rates and migration flows. We describe trends toward or away from metropolitan areas, the geographical distribution of these trends, and we distinguish between internal and international migration." Data are from annual statistics for the period 1966-1982.
Correspondence: McMaster University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Program for Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M4, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30572 Anderson, William P.; Papageorgiou, Yorgos Y. Metropolitan and nonmetropolitan population trends in Canada 1966-1982: 2. Stationary disequilibrium. QSEP Research Report, No. 259, Nov 1989. 24 pp. McMaster University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Program for Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population: Hamilton, Canada. In Eng.
"This is the second of two articles dealing with broad population movements within and between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas in Canada during the recent past....Here we focus on the evolving relationship between stationary equilibrium and corresponding observed population patterns. The difference between the two gives a measure of stationary disequilibrium in the system. We link stationary disequilibrium with the decision to migrate and we provide some evidence for this relationship. In our study, internal net migration and stationary disequilibrium serve as aggregate, partial descriptors of recent metropolitan concentration and dispersion tendencies in Canada." Data are from annual statistica for the period 1966-1982.
For Part 1 of this study, also published in 1989, see elsewhere in this issue.
Correspondence: McMaster University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Program for Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4M4, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30573 Hart, Keith. Rural-urban migration in West Africa. In: Migrants, workers, and the social order, edited by Jeremy Eades. 1987. 65-81 pp. Association of Social Anthropologists [ASA]: London, England; Tavistock Publications: New York, New York/London, England. In Eng.
"This paper considers West African rural-urban migration and associated labour markets from the perspective of the region's overall development since the Second World War. Three features of this process stand out--state formation during this century, both colonial and postcolonial; incorporation into the world economy through export of primary products in exchange for manufactures, and, increasingly, food and energy; and expansion of the home market without significant industrialization or agricultural mechanization....My questions are: How has postwar migration on such a massive scale been made possible? Can the current level of urbanization be sustained; and what is likely to happen to labour markets if it cannot?"
Correspondence: K. Hart, University of the West Indies, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Consortium Graduate School for Social Science, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica. Location: Princeton University Library (FST).

56:30574 Hartmann, David J. Racial change in the Chicago area, 1980-1987. Sociology and Social Research, Vol. 74, No. 3, Apr 1990. 168-73 pp. Los Angeles, California. In Eng.
The author analyzes racial change in the Chicago, Illinois, area during the period 1980-1987. "Acceleration of minority suburbanization has been identified as a major component of metropolitan migration....Consistent support has been reported for the position that black suburbanization in particular has not markedly reduced levels of segregation....While this study does not refute such conclusions, it does modify them by finding increasing numbers of municipalities with small black inroads and simultaneous black and white population increase....The possibility of a long-term deconcentration of suburban blacks is therefore suggested."
Correspondence: D. J. Hartmann, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National, Springfield, MO 65804. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

56:30575 Minakawa, Yuichi. Demographic consideration of socio-economic problems in remote depopulated rural communities. Jinkogaku Kenkyu/Journal of Population Studies, No. 12, May 1989. 25-35 pp. Tokyo, Japan. In Jpn. with sum. in Eng.
Since 1960, out-migration of native junior and senior high school graduates and young farmers from rural mountain villages of Japan has severely diminished the local populations. The author discusses how this out-migration affects demographic aging, increased care needs for the elderly, and local economic growth. The government's attempts to solve the out-migration problems are assessed.
Location: Princeton University Library (Gest).

56:30576 Mohtadi, Hamid. Rural inequality and rural-push versus urban-pull migration: the case of Iran, 1956-1976. World Development, Vol. 18, No. 6, Jun 1990. 837-44 pp. Elmsford, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"Using Iranian data (1956-76), this paper reexamines the classic debate on rural-push versus urban-pull migration. Following a discussion of the push vs. pull distinction, a method is introduced to operationalize such a distinction for empirical testing. The connection between rural inequality and push versus pull factors is then analyzed for Iran. Drawing on an earlier study which showed the dominance of push factors among the landless and pull factors among the landed farmers, this paper shows that overall migration (among both groups) responded more to push than to pull factors during the 1956-76 period."
For the earlier study, published by the same author in 1986, see 52:30616.
Correspondence: H. Mohtadi, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53201. Location: Princeton University Library (PF).

56:30577 Ristrini; Budiarto, Wasis. Migration and urbanization: relations and policies on population migration controls. [Migrasi dan urbanisasi: masalah, hubungan dan kebijaksanaan pengendalian perpindahan penduduk.] Majalah Demografi Indonesia/Indonesian Journal of Demography, Vol. 16, No. 32, Dec 1989. v-vi, 1-19 pp. Jakarta, Indonesia. In Ind. with sum. in Eng.
Trends and determinants of rural-urban migration and urbanization in Indonesia are analyzed, and recommendations for relevant policies are made.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30578 Thapa, Poonam. Nepal: socio-economic change and rural migration. 1989. viii, 184 pp. Vikas Publishing: New Delhi, India. In Eng.
"The objective of this book is to examine the relationships between socioeconomic factors and rural migration in Nepal. The research analyses migration decision-making at individual and household levels to explore aspects of migration as an adjustment strategy. There are four parts to this analysis: 1. Examination of historical relations among landholders, traditional labour obligations of the peasantry and the role of caste; 2. Use of survey data to identify processes of socioeconomic differentiation...over a period of 10 years, from 1970 to 1980; 3. Examination of the circumstances under which an individual or the entire household selects migration as an adjustment strategy...; 4. Investigation of the consequences of out-migration and in-migration with respect to social and economic welfare of the household at origin and destination communities."
Correspondence: Vikas Publishing House, 576 Masjid Road, Jangpura, New Delhi 110 014, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:30579 Yadava, K. N. S.; Singh, Shri K. Population growth and migration. In: Population transition in India, Volume 1, edited by S. N. Singh, M. K. Premi, P. S. Bhatia, and Ashish Bose. 1989. 445-61 pp. B. R. Publishing: Delhi, India. In Eng.
"To find out the effects of migration on population growth rate [in India], some migration policies are worked out in this paper to compare the reduction in the rate of increase in population growth in rural areas due to rural-urban migration of males with that of females' migration at one or more age levels. That is, to determine what proportions of female migrants at one or more age level would result in the same reduction in the rate of population growth as that resulting from husband-wife separation due to male migration....The second objective of this paper is to work out the size of population for both long and short periods under stability and stationary conditions."
Correspondence: K. N. S. Yadava, Banaras Hindu University, Department of Statistics, Varanasi 221 005, UP, India. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


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