Volume 56 - Number 1 - Spring 1990

B. Regional Population Studies

Regional studies are defined as international, national, and subnational, but not global.

B.1. Regional Demography--Long Studies

Major, book-length, regional analyses and studies centering on the structure of population and on the components and rates of growth in the modern period.

56:10015 Chao, Ming-Guo; Fang, Shu-Nan; Gu, Qing-Zhong; Li, Fang-Zhen. Chinese population: Jiling province. [Zhongguo renkou: Jiling fence.] ISBN 7-5005-0199-4. 1988. 452 pp. China Financial and Economic Press: Beijing, China. In Chi.
This is one in a planned series of 32 volumes devoted to the population of China's provinces. The present volume examines the population dynamics of Jiling province. It presents basic information on the social, economic, and ecological status of the province as well as population dynamics from around 770 B.C. to the present day. Consideration is given to fertility, nuptiality, mortality, migration, population distribution, urbanization, and family planning policy. Data are from official sources, including the 1953, 1962, and 1983 censuses and other historical statistical sources.
For volumes concerning other provinces, see elsewhere in this issue and 55:40024 and 40025.
Correspondence: China Financial and Economic Press, 8 East Daifesi Avenue, Beijing East Region, China. Location: Princeton University Library (Gest).

56:10016 Duchesne, Louis. The demographic situation in Quebec: 1989 edition. [La situation demographique au Quebec: edition 1989.] Statistiques Demographiques, ISBN 2-551-12238-4. 1989. 230 pp. Bureau de la Statistique du Quebec: Quebec, Canada. In Fre.
Current demographic trends in Quebec province, Canada, are reviewed using data from official provincial and Canadian sources, the most recent of which concern the year 1988. Chapters are included on population trends and natural increase, age and sex distribution, mortality, fertility, nuptiality and marital status, migration, and cultural aspects, including language, education, and marriage.
For the 1988 edition, see 55:10030.
Correspondence: Bureau de la Statistique du Quebec, 117 rue Saint-Andre, Quebec, Quebec G1K 3Y3, Canada. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:10017 Japan. Institute of Population Problems (Tokyo, Japan). The fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Institute of Population Problems. Aug 1989. 353 pp. Tokyo, Japan. In Jpn.
This work describes the activities and achievements of Japan's Institute of Population Problems during the 50-year period since its foundation in 1939.
Correspondence: Institute of Population Problems, Ministry of Health and Welfare, 1-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:10018 Mexico. Consejo Nacional de Poblacion [CONAPO] (Mexico City, Mexico). The demography of the northern border of Mexico. [Demografia de la frontera norte de Mexico.] Oct 1988. 129 pp. Mexico City, Mexico. In Spa.
Demographic trends in the northern frontier of Mexico are analyzed. Results are presented of a sociodemographic survey conducted in the area of Mexico bordering the United States, based on census and survey data covering the twentieth century. Aspects considered include the demographic transition and its determinants in the area, spatial changes, demographic perspectives, and the development of population policies for the region.
Location: New York Public Library.

56:10019 Pan, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Zhen-Dong; Chen, Yong-Xiao; Lu, Zhuo. Chinese population: Guizhou province. [Zhongguo renkou: Guizhou fence.] ISBN 7-5005-0246-X. 1988. 474 pp. China Financial and Economic Press: Beijing, China. In Chi.
This is one in a planned series of 32 volumes devoted to the population of China's provinces. The present volume explores the population dynamics of Guizhou province. It presents basic information on the social, economic, and ecological status of the province as well as population trends from around 770 B.C. to the present day. Consideration is given to fertility, nuptiality, mortality, migration, population distribution, urbanization, and family planning policy. Data are from official sources, including the 1953, 1962, and 1983 censuses and other historical statistical sources.
For volumes concerning other provinces, see elsewhere in this issue and 55:40024 and 40025.
Correspondence: China Financial and Economic Press, 8 East Daifesi Avenue, Beijing East Region, China. Location: Princeton University Library (Gest).

B.2. Regional Demography--Short Studies

Regional studies that are fewer than 100 pages in length and that focus on the structure of population and on the components and rates of growth in the modern period.

56:10020 Blum, Alain. Demographic trends in the USSR and the countries of Eastern Europe. Continuity or change. [Demographies de l'URSS et des pays de l'Est. Continuite ou rupture.] Notes et Etudes Documentaires, No. 4891-92, 1989. 11-39 pp. Paris, France. In Fre.
Demographic trends in the USSR and countries of Eastern Europe are analyzed using data recently made available as a result of perestroika. The available sources of data are first reviewed. Separate consideration is then given to fertility, birth control, illegitimacy, infant mortality, adult mortality, and regional differences in life expectancy in the USSR. Next, the question of developing population policies that consider regional demographic differences in the USSR is discussed. A final section reviews similar topics for the Eastern European countries.
Correspondence: A. Blum, Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: New York Public Library.

56:10021 Bretz, Manfred. Selected demographic trends and current status of the population census 1987 in the Federal Republic of Germany. In: Referate zum deutsch-franzosischen Arbeitstreffen auf dem Gebiet der Demographie vom 21. bis 24. September 1987 in Rouen. Materialien zur Bevolkerungswissenschaft, No. 62, 1989. 75-118 pp. Bundesinstitut fur Bevolkerungsforschung: Wiesbaden, Germany, Federal Republic of. In Eng.
The author first reviews current and past demographic trends in West Germany, including fertility, mortality, marriage, divorce, and migration. He then examines the status of the 1987 census. Some consideration is given to regional differences.
Correspondence: M. Bretz, Statistisches Bundesamt, Gustav-Stresemann-Ring 11, Postfach 5528, 6200 Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:10022 Croze, Marcel. Demographic tables. The population of France: history and geography. [Tableaux demographiques. La population en France: histoire et geographie.] ISBN 2-7332-8006-6. 1988. viii, 76 pp. Institut National d'Etudes Demographiques [INED]: Paris, France; Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques [INSEE]: Paris, France. In Fre.
Tables containing demographic data for France are presented, together with introductory texts. Data are from official sources, including the 1982 census. Chapters are organized under the subjects of total population; spatial distribution; population trends; sex, age, and marital status; and nationality.
Correspondence: INED, 27 rue du Commandeur, 75675 Paris Cedex 14, France. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:10023 de Beer, J. The eighties: change or continuity in demographic trends? [Jaren tachtig: ombuiging of voortzetting van demografische trends?] Maandstatistiek van de Bevolking, Vol. 37, No. 12, Dec 1989. 16-35 pp. Voorburg, Netherlands. In Dut. with sum. in Eng.
The author discusses demographic trends in the Netherlands, including age structure, marriage patterns, life expectancy of both sexes, migration patterns, and geographic distribution. It is noted that population growth during the 1980s was at its lowest point since World War II, and yet there was a slight rise in fertility.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:10024 Edwards, Steven F. Estimates of future demographic changes in the coastal zone. Coastal Management, Vol. 17, No. 3, 1989. 229-40 pp. London, England. In Eng.
"This paper reports estimates of the relative and absolute sizes of the coastal population in the United States in the years 1990, 2000, and 2010. The estimates vary greatly among states in both the rate and direction of change, with increases expected for most marine coastal states and declines for most states bordering the Great Lakes. Together, only about 52.9 percent, 53.3 percent, and 53.6 percent of the United States's population is predicted to live in counties entirely or substantially within 50 miles of coastlines in the years 1990, 2000, and 2010, respectively. The need for long-range planning is not diminished, however, since the absolute size of the coastal population is estimated to increase to nearly 143 million people by the turn of the century."
Correspondence: S. F. Edwards, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Center, Woods Hole, MA. Location: U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

56:10025 Fernandez Vargas, Valentina. Regional differentials in Spain. [Desequilibrios regionales en Espana.] Revista Internacional de Sociologia, Vol. 46, No. 2, Apr-Jun 1988. 169-241 pp. Madrid, Spain. In Spa.
Socioeconomic differentials among the provinces of Spain in the 1980s are analyzed. Appendixes present a selection of demographic data, including age and sex distribution, 1960, 1970, and 1981; sex distribution, spatial distribution, and population density by province, 1983; and data on employment, the labor force, and income.
Correspondence: V. Fernandez Vargas, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Economia Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Economicas y Empresariales, Universidad Autonoma, 28049 Madrid, Spain. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

56:10026 Goliber, Thomas J. Africa's expanding population: old problems, new policies. Population Bulletin, Vol. 44, No. 3, Nov 1989. 52 pp. Population Reference Bureau: Washington, D.C. In Eng.
Sub-Saharan Africa's expanding population and the challenges it faces to achieve economic and social progress are examined. "With an estimated 1989 population of 512 million, the 42 countries of sub-Saharan Africa have the highest birth and death rates of any major world region. While death rates have fallen since the 1960s, persistently high birth rates yield annual growth rates above 3 percent in many countries. The United Nations projects that the region's population will increase 2.7 times by 2025--to 1.4 billion." The author covers such topics as migration and settlement patterns and the impact of population growth on land and food supply, the labor force, education, and health. The emergence of AIDS in Africa and its geographic concentration, prevalence, and demographic impact are discussed. The determinants of the region's high fertility rate are examined, and population policy formulation for the countries of Zambia, Nigeria, Zaire, and Liberia is described. The author also addresses issues concerned with fertility decline and the outlook for the future of Sub-Saharan Africa.
Correspondence: Population Reference Bureau, 777 14th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

56:10027 Gunasekaran, S.; Than, Mya. Population change in Burma: a comparison of the 1973 and 1983 censuses. Sojourn, Vol. 3, No. 2, Aug 1988. 171-86 pp. Singapore. In Eng.
"A comparison of the 1973 and 1983 censuses provides ample evidence of a decline in fertility in Burma [Myanmar]. The proportion of children in the population fell substantially in the ten-year period accompanied by a significant increase in the mean age at marriage as indicated by the higher female...mean age at marriage. An analysis of the regional variations in population density indicates inter-regional movement of population. While there is marked success in the literacy programmes as indicated by the sharp reduction in the prevalence of illiteracy, especially among the females, changes in the industrial and occupational structure of the labour force suggest worsening economic conditions. Under these circumstances, it is surmised that the fall in fertility, without any concerted government policy for inducing such a decline, may be a first-level and benign response of a more literate and hence more informed population to rising aspirations and the inability of the economy to accommodate these aspirations."
Correspondence: S. Gunasekaran, Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Heng Mui Keng Terrace, Pasir Panjang, Singapore 0511. Location: World Bank, Joint Bank-Fund Library, Washington, D.C.

56:10028 Gurwitt, Rob. How we spent the 1980s: a pre-census look at a changing America. Governing, Vol. 2, No. 11, Aug 1989. 26-33 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
The author reviews demographic changes that have occurred during the 1980s in the United States. Consideration is given to the demographic impacts of immigration, inner city decline, and demographic aging. The focus is on the local impact of such changes.
Location: Princeton University Library (SF).

56:10029 Maleckova, J. Development of demographic indicators in Czechoslovakia in 1987 and 1986: (1986--definitive data, 1987--preliminary data). [Vyvoj demografickych ukazatelu v CSSR v letech 1987 a 1986: (1986--definitivni udaje, 1987--predbezne udaje).] Ceskoslovenska Pediatrie, Vol. 44, No. 1, Jan 1989. 29-32 pp. Prague, Czechoslovakia. In Cze.
Selected vital statistics are presented and analyzed for Czechoslovakia for 1986 and 1987 concerning the whole country, the two individual republics, and provinces. Data are included on fertility, stillbirths, infant and neonatal mortality, and induced abortion; births, deaths, and induced abortions; and infant mortality by cause and birth weight.
Correspondence: J. Maleckova, Ustav Zdravotnickych Informaci a Statistiky, W. Piecka 98, 100 00 Prague 10, Czechoslovakia. Location: New York Academy of Medicine.

56:10030 Nhan, Vu Quy; Hanenberg, R. The 1988 demographic survey of Viet Nam. Asia-Pacific Population Journal, Vol. 4, No. 3, Sep 1989. 3-14 pp. Bangkok, Thailand. In Eng.
"The 1988 Viet Nam Survey was the first country-wide demographic survey of Viet Nam. The results suggest that the goal of a population growth rate of 1.7 per cent by 1990 is not likely to be achieved, because fertility is still quite high. Moreover, if mortality is as low as it appears from the survey, it will be even more difficult to reduce the growth rate. However, fertility has been decreasing and it may be undergoing a phase in which it can be brought down rapidly."
Correspondence: V. Q. Nhan, National Committee for Population and Family Planning, Hanoi, Viet Nam. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


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