Volume 54 - Number 2 - Summer 1988

O. The Production of Population Statistics

Studies concerned with the actual production of basic population data. Includes more than governmental publications.

O.1. Population Statistics, General Aspects

Studies on the collection of general demographic statistics and related problems such as studies on data processing.

54:20837 Afzal, Mohammad. Some considerations for demographic assessment of developing countries. Pakistan Development Review, Vol. 25, No. 4, Winter 1986. 517-34 pp. Islamabad, Pakistan. In Eng.
The author examines data collection and analysis as well as estimation methods used in demographic analysis in developing countries. He states that "the overall objective of demographic assessment is a systematic analysis of demographic parameters in order to determine demographic trends and their interactions with the social and economic variables of concern to the policy-maker....The non-availability of accurate demographic information in the face of the pressing need for socio-economic development and for limiting the growth rate of population led to major advancements in developing alternative ways of demographic data collection and techniques for demographic estimation. As a result of the new approaches, a number of data sets and research studies based on such data have been produced for different developing countries." A comment by Sultan S. Hashmi is included (pp. 531-4).
Correspondence: M. Afzal, Chief of Research (Population), Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad, Pakistan. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20838 Castles, Ian. Social statistics and social change. Journal of the Australian Population Association, Vol. 4, No. 2, Nov 1987. 93-105 pp. Carlton South, Australia. In Eng.
The author analyzes the process of statistical data collection by modern nation states. He concentrates on the links between programs to collect social and economic data and on the interrelationship between vital statistics and national accounts. Guidelines for statisticians are outlined The geographical focus is on the world in general and Australia in particular.
Correspondence: I. Castles, Australian Statistician, PO Box 10, Belconnen, ACT 2616, Australia. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20839 Fleming, Sue. Socio-economic statistics on women: five case studies in the Pacific. South Pacific Commission Technical Paper, No. 193, ISBN 982-203-094-0. Mar 1987. ix, 85 pp. South Pacific Commission: Noumea, New Caledonia. In Eng.
"The objectives of the study are: (i) to review data and data collection systems in the South Pacific region and to assess their adequacy in providing appropriate and accurate information on women; (ii) to identify areas in need of improvement; and (iii) to make recommendations as to how improvements might be implemented." The study focuses on Fiji, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, the Solomon Islands, and Tonga. Consideration is given to data on family and households, migration, fertility and mortality, ethnic groups, health, education, and employment.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20840 Hill, Allan G.; Graham, Wendy J. West African sources of health and mortality information: a comparative review. Infant Mortality and Health Studies: Technical Study, No. 58e, Pub. Order No. IDRC-TS58e. ISBN 0-88936-506-7. 1988. viii, 48, [16] pp. International Development Research Centre [IDRC]: Ottawa, Canada. In Eng. with sum. in Fre; Spa.
"The availability of different sources of [health and mortality] information is reviewed for four West African countries [Mali, Senegal, Gambia, and Sierra Leone]. The survey shows that a great deal of potentially valuable information is being collected, much less of it analyzed. Some series are particularly valuable for the study of trends. There are often severe problems of interpretation because, in the routinely collected data from the health services, there are large selection biases that can be difficult to circumvent. The conclusion based on this work is that further development of techniques for the collection and analysis of data routinely produced by the health services is probably a more productive route to follow than attempting to install expensive registration systems as found in developing countries." This publication is also available in French.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20841 Uyanga, Joseph. New approaches to the collection of planning data: on birth and death and estimation of vital rates. Philippine Geographical Journal, Vol. 30, No. 3-4, Jul-Dec 1986. 116-29 pp. Manila, Philippines. In Eng.
Recent developments in the collection of demographic data are described. The emphasis is on indirect methods involving single-round surveys. The author reviews both the basic demographic questionnaire and questionnaires focusing on the last live birth. The geographical focus is on developing countries.
Correspondence: J. Uyanga, University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Location: U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

O.2. Registration of Vital Statistics

Studies of the organization and operation of vital statistics at local and national levels, of international comparability, and of special problems.

54:20842 Bobadilla, Jose L.; Ceron, Prudencia; Coria, Irma. Coverage and quality of the registration of perinatal deaths occurring in health institutions in the Federal District. [Cobertura y calidad del registro de defunciones perinatales ocurridas en instituciones de salud del Distrito Federal.] Estudios Demograficos y Urbanos, Vol. 2, No. 2, May-Aug 1987. 257-71, 382 pp. Mexico City, Mexico. In Spa. with sum. in Eng.
"This paper presents the results of the first direct attempt at evaluating the coverage of the perinatal death registration in the Distrito Federal [of Mexico]; this study is based on the information gathered from 574 deaths which took place in 23 hospitals in the Distrito Federal during a three month period in 1984. Both the causes of the failure to register many of these deaths and the quality of the information presented in perinatal death certificates are pointed out and discussed here. According to the evidence analyzed, it is clear that underregistration in the Distrito Federal is extremely marked....The paper suggests the possibility of establishing a hospital registration system which would keep a record of both deaths and births. It also stresses the need for establishing rules to detect fetal deaths plus the need for unifying criteria regarding the definition of 'live birth'."
Correspondence: J. L. Bobadilla, Centro de Investigaciones en Salud Publica, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico City, Mexico. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20843 Meir, Avinoam. Comparative vital statistics along the pastoral nomadism-sedentarism continuum. Human Ecology, Vol. 15, No. 1, Mar 1987. 91-107 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
"This paper attempts to gather and present as much information as possible on crude birth and death rates and natural increase rates for various pastoral nomadic societies in different African and Middle Eastern countries. The information is arranged by a subdivision into nomads, seminomads, and sedentarized nomads. A summarization of this information suggests a possible pattern by which birth rates rise, death rates fall (but may rise in certain circumstances), and natural increase rates rise along the nomadism-sedentarism continuum. Such a possible pattern has several policy implications for governments assessing the needs of a nomadic society undergoing a process of change in its socio-ecological relationships."
Correspondence: A. Meir, Department of Geography, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. Location: Princeton University Library (PR).

54:20844 Salhi, Mohammed. The evaluation of death registration by methods based on the stable population model. [L'evaluation de l'enregistrement des deces par les methodes pouvant reposer sur le modele des populations stables.] ISBN 2-87085-134-0. 1987. 244 pp. Universite Catholique de Louvain, Departement de Demographie: Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; CIACO Editeur: Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. In Fre.
Stable population methods for evaluating death registration data are developed. The problem of underregistration in developing countries and ways of evaluating it are discussed. Several stable population methods are outlined and then considered under conditions involving a drop first in mortality and then in fertility. Distortions due to age misreporting are examined, and the methods are applied in the context of migration and differential death registration by age. A simulation of the existing demographic situation in Algeria is used to assess the methods' applicability and limitations.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

O.3. Population Censuses and Registers

Studies of the organization and operation of population censuses and registers at local and national levels, of international comparability, and of special problems.

54:20845 Appel, Roland; Hummel, Dieter. Beware the census! Collected, stored, and tabulated. [Vorsicht Volkszahlung! Erfasst, vernetzt und ausgezahlt.] ISBN 3-923243-31-6. Feb 1987. 245 pp. Kolner Volksblatt: Cologne, Germany, Federal Republic of. In Ger.
This is a collection of articles by supporters of the boycott of the Federal Republic of Germany's 1987 census. Arguments against the need for census data are presented. Some of the authors discuss the dangers and potential abuses of the stored data, as well as the possibility of its use for identifying individuals and for state surveillance. Readers are urged not to participate; a section is included that describes how to resist being counted and protect one's personal data.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20846 Canada. Statistics Canada (Ottawa, Canada). Census Canada 1986. Census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations: a 1986 and 1981 comparison. Statistics Canada Reference Paper Series, Pub. Order No. 99-105E. ISBN 0-660-12508-0. May 1987. 89 pp. Ottawa, Canada. In Eng.
"This paper [which is also available in French] is part of a series of reference documents designed to assist users of census data in finding, understanding, using and comparing data....The purpose of this paper is to provide a means of comparing 1986 census metropolitan areas (CMAs) and census agglomerations (CAs) to their 1981 delineations."
Location: Stanford University Libraries. Source: APLIC Census Network List, No. 76, Aug-Sep 1987.

54:20847 Li, Chengrui; Tie, Dazhang; Wu, Hui; Sun, Jingxin. A census of one billion people. Papers for International Seminar on China's 1982 Population Census. ISBN 962-7063-41-1. 1987. 704 pp. Economic Information and Agency: Hong Kong. Distributed by Westview Press, 5500 Central Avenue, Boulder, CO 80301 (outside of China, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Japan). In Eng.
This publication, which is also available in Chinese, presents the proceedings of the International Seminar on China's 1982 Population Census, held in Beijing, March 26-31, 1984. It contains 47 papers organized under four topics: preparations for the census, data processing, evaluation of data reliability, and data analysis. The papers were prepared by both Chinese and international contributors.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20848 Lintzel, Ewa. Classifications of socio-occupational groups to be applied in the general census of 1988. [Jaka klasyfikacje grup spoleczno-zawodowych zastosuje sie w NSP 1988.] Wiadomosci Statystyczne, Vol. 32, No. 11, Nov 1987. 5-8 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Pol.
Details are presented concerning the 27 classifications of occupations adopted for the 1988 census of Poland.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20849 Luther, Norman Y.; Retherford, Robert D. Consistent correction of census and vital registration data. Mathematical Population Studies, Vol. 1, No. 1, 1988. 1-20, 123 pp. New York, New York/London, England. In Eng. with sum. in Fre.
"A new procedure is developed for simultaneously and consistently correcting two or more censuses and intercensal registered births and deaths. The procedure begins with a set of preliminary correction factors, which are not necessarily consistent. It then uses the mathematics of finite-dimensional vector spaces to derive an optimal set of final consistent correction factors. The optimization procedure is based on the principle that there exists in a hyperplane a unique point of minimum distance from a fixed point not in the hyperplane. For purposes of illustration, the procedure is applied to the censuses of 1970, 1975, and 1980 and intercensal registered births and deaths for the periods 1970-75 and 1975-80 for the Republic of Korea."
Correspondence: N. Y. Luther, Department of Mathematics, Hawaii Pacific College, Honolulu, HI 96813. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20850 Ma, Yuanji. Analysis and verification of errors in the data processing of the third national population census. Population Research, Vol. 3, No. 3, Jul 1986. 24-8 pp. Beijing, China. In Eng.
The author evaluates the quality of the data in the 1982 census of China using data concerning the province of Qinghai. The author concludes that the system designed to identify errors in data for China as a whole is effective since the analysis of errors in the Quinghai data produced similar results.
This a translation of the Chinese article published in 1985 and cited in 54:10826.
Correspondence: Y. Ma, Computer Center, Qinghai Provincial Planning Commission, Qinghai, China. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20851 United States. Bureau of the Census (Washington, D.C.). Special censuses conducted between July 1, 1982 and December 31, 1985. Current Population Reports, Series P-28: Special Censuses, No. 1509, Oct 1987. 17, [3] pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"This report summarizes the 167 special censuses conducted by the [U.S.] Bureau of the Census following the April 1, 1980 decennial census through December 31, 1985. The areas that had special censuses consist of incorporated places such as cities and villages, minor civil divisions such as towns and townships, counties, and American Indian reservations....The following categories have population questions which are included in a special census: household relationship, age, sex, race, and Spanish origin. Occupancy and vacancy status, number of units in structure, and tenure data are collected for housing units."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20852 Zalewski, Leslaw. The 1988 general census in light of the expected recommendations of the CMEA Permanent Statistical Commission. [Narodowy Spis Powszechny 1988 w swietle przewidywanych zalecen Stalej Komisji Statystycznej RWPG.] Wiadomosci Statystyczne, Vol. 32, No. 11, Nov 1987. 3-5 pp. Warsaw, Poland. In Pol.
The author describes a set of principles concerning census procedures agreed to by the countries of the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance. These include an agreement to conduct a decennial census at the end of each decade and close to the beginning of a year, and an agreed number of minimum and optimum components. Dates of future censuses include: Poland, 1988; USSR, 1989; Mongolia, 1989; Viet Nam, 1989; Romania, 1990; Hungary, 1990; Cuba, 1990; Czechoslovakia, 1990; German Democratic Republic, 1991; Yugoslavia, 1991; and Bulgaria, 2000.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

O.4. Surveys

Studies of periodic or special surveys relevant to population studies, excluding KAP (knowledge, attitudes, and practice of family planning) studies, which are coded under F.4.4. Attitudes Toward Fertility and Fertility Control .

54:20853 Anderson, J. E.; Ali, H. E.; Dakroury, A. H.; Said, A. K.; Hussein, M. A.; El-Ghorab, M. I.; Miller, D. C.; Brink, E. W. Use of nutrition surveys for family planning programme evaluation: the case of the Arab Republic of Egypt nutrition status. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, Vol. 33, No. 2, Apr 1987. 85-92 pp. London, England. In Eng.
The authors suggest that fertility and contraceptive prevalence surveys and nutritional status surveys both measure closely related phenomena, and that combining resources in a single survey can increase the information significantly with very little increase in resources expended. Data from the 1978 Nutrition Status Survey conducted in Egypt are used to illustrate how fertility and contraceptive use information can be obtained along with nutritional status data. The value of the combined approach for studying the relationship between family planning use and child health is noted.
Correspondence: J. E. Anderson, Family Planning Evaluation Division, Bureau of Epidemiology, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333. Location: New York Academy of Medicine.

54:20854 Brass, William. Implications for future demographic enquiries. In: The World Fertility Survey: an assessment, edited by John Cleland, Chris Scott, and David Whitelegge. 1987. 934-49 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author assesses the implications of the World Fertility Survey for forecasting future research developments. He states that the most fundamental finding is "that the recording of birth histories retrospectively can be successful even in populations with low standards of literacy and relatively unfamiliar with national systems of statistics." It is concluded that surveys of the WFS type should be widely used to collect demographic data in developing countries. "Their main contribution will be in the estimation of trends in fertility and child mortality, detailed in time and component parts, in close relation to proximate determinants. The design of the surveys, in questions, sample sizes and timing should be fitted to the other sources of population data, notably censuses."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20855 Caldwell, John C.; Ruzicka, Lado T. Demographic levels and trends. In: The World Fertility Survey: an assessment, edited by John Cleland, Chris Scott, and David Whitelegge. 1987. 741-72 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The authors assess the impact of World Fertility Survey findings on generally accepted views concerning demographic levels and trends. "This chapter attempts to do this with regard to fertility, mortality, nuptiality and lactation, but will not enter the area of fertility determinants, and confines itself to developing countries. We examine both the impact of WFS upon demographic figures with official authorization and its more general contribution to knowledge in these fields....Considerable attention is paid to journal articles which represent publications independent of WFS and of governments...."
The authors conclude that "the World Fertility Survey has made a major contribution to the study of fertility by insisting, so far as was in its power, on standards of excellence in survey work, data processing and analysis. The existence of its fertility histories and lactation data have substantially advanced analytical methodology and will probably continue to do so for some time to come. WFS has probably not greatly affected estimates of the overall birth rates, death rates or rates of population growth. It almost certainly has made a greater contribution to estimates of infant and child mortality and to the age structure of fertility. For some countries, its estimates of trends in fertility and infant and child mortality will probably be found to be sound, but we suspect that a substantial number will prove to have been quite wide of the mark."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20856 Casterline, John B. The collection and analysis of community data. In: The World Fertility Survey: an assessment, edited by John Cleland, Chris Scott, and David Whitelegge. 1987. 882-905 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
This chapter is concerned with the value of the community data collected during the course of the World Fertility Survey. The author assesses the importance of such data for analyzing the effects of family planning and health services on fertility and mortality, for examining the relationships between socioeconomic opportunities and fertility, and for exploring the relationships among fertility, mortality, and migration. The design of the community survey and the process of data collection in the minority of WFS countries that did collect community data are described. The author concludes that data of this kind are proving valuable despite their obvious drawbacks.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20857 Chander, Ramesh; Grootaert, Christiaan. Standardized multi-national research: strengths and weaknesses. In: The World Fertility Survey: an assessment, edited by John Cleland, Chris Scott, and David Whitelegge. 1987. 923-33 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The advantages and disadvantages of multinational research projects of the kind represented by the World Fertility Survey are studied. "In this chapter we outline some of the arguments that can form part of such a study....We review selected international research efforts, then...the benefits and disadvantages of multinational approaches to each of the four research components, before presenting our recommendations...." The authors conclude that the same approach could usefully be applied to the study of agriculture, migration, and mortality.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20858 Cleland, John; Scott, Chris; Whitelegge, David. The World Fertility Survey: an assessment. ISBN 0-19-828525-6. LC 87-23483. 1987. xvi, 1,058 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
This book, which consists of 39 papers by various authors, is an assessment and review of the findings and accomplishments of the World Fertility Survey (WFS). The papers are grouped into eight substantive parts concerning the origin and nature of the project; the data collection instruments; survey management, design, and cost; sampling and data collection; data processing; data evaluation, analysis, and archiving; different aspects of the WFS contribution to knowledge; and implications of the WFS for policy and future data collection.
Selected items will be cited in this or subsequent issues of Population Index.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20859 De Sandre, Paolo. The WFS in developed countries. In: The World Fertility Survey: an assessment, edited by John Cleland, Chris Scott, and David Whitelegge. 1987. 906-20 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The author reviews the 20 surveys that were carried out in developed countries under general guidelines from the World Fertility Survey. He notes that the use of both single-round sample surveys and questions developed to meet local needs has reduced the possibility for comparative analysis and for the analysis of fertility levels and trends over time.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20860 Haaga, John G. Reliability of retrospective survey data on infant feeding. Demography, Vol. 25, No. 2, May 1988. 307-14 pp. Alexandria, Virginia. In Eng.
"This article examines retest reliability and digit preference in retrospective survey data on breastfeeding duration and type of supplementary food, covering three decades and reported by more than 1,200 Malaysian women. Women with little or no education, rural residents, and those of Malay ethnicity are found to give less reliable data. In a logistic regression analysis, these respondent characteristics are more important determinants of data quality than the length of the recall period."
Correspondence: J. G. Haaga, Economics and Statistics Department, Rand Corporation, 2100 M Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20037. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20861 Hermalin, Albert I.; Osheba, Ibrahim K.; Sayed, Hussein A.-A. On the reliability of community data in Egypt. Population Studies Center Research Report, No. 88-117, Jan 1988. 30 pp. University of Michigan, Population Studies Center: Ann Arbor, Michigan. In Eng.
The reliability of community data in Egypt is examined using data for areas covered by both the 1980 Egyptian Fertility Survey (EFS) and the 1982 Population and Development Program (PDP) Community Surveys. Results are presented in tabular form for the percent agreement, reliability ratio, and index of reliability for selected community variables. The authors conclude that "the levels of response inconsistency between the 1980 EFS and 1982 PDP Community Surveys are rather high for most of the village variables examined. Second, these high levels of response inconsistency result from all villages showing inconsistency on a few variables, rather than a few villages showing inconsistency on many variables."
Correspondence: Population Studies Center, University of Michigan, 1225 S. University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20862 Kovar, Mary G. Aging in the eighties, people living alone--two years later: data from the 1984 and 1986 Longitudinal Study of Aging interviews. Advance Data from Vital and Health Statistics, No. 149, Pub. Order No. DHHS (PHS) 88-1250. Apr 4, 1988. 12 pp. U.S. National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS]: Hyattsville, Maryland. In Eng.
"The [U.S.] Longitudinal Study of Aging is a long-term collaborative project with the National Institute of Aging that involves matches with existing records, such as death certificates, for all of the people in the Supplement on Aging, and reinterviews with samples of people who were in the 1984 study....One part of the Longitudinal Study of Aging involved selecting a sample of 5,151 people who were age 70 years and over in 1984 to be reinterviewed in 1986....Information about the 1,921 people in the 1986 Longitudinal Study of Aging reinterview sample who had been living alone in 1984 is the basis of this report." Tabular data are included on housing characteristics, contacts with children, social contacts, and assistance with daily living activities.
Correspondence: NCHS, 3700 East-West Highway, Hyattsville, MD 20782. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20863 Lengsfeld, Wolfgang. Opinions and attitudes about population trends in the Federal Republic of Germany: results of an opinion poll. [Meinungen und Einstellungen zur Bevolkerungsentwicklung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland: Ergebnisse einer Meinungsumfrage.] Materialien zur Bevolkerungswissenschaft: Sonderheft, No. 14, 1987. 89 pp. Bundesinstitut fur Bevolkerungsforschung: Wiesbaden, Germany, Federal Republic of. In Ger.
These are the results of a 1984 opinion poll in the Federal Republic of Germany concerning people's knowledge, opinions, and fears about population trends. The poll involved 2,500 West German citizens aged 18 and over. Six categories were explored: knowledge and information about population trends and their consequences, knowledge of family allowances and opinions on family policy measures, marriage and consensual union, the importance of children and reasons for the fertility decline, the significance of women's occupational status, and attitude toward the foreign population.
For a related study, published in 1986, see 53:30789.
Correspondence: Bundesinstitut fur Bevolkerungsforschung, Gustav-Stresemann-Ring 6, Postf. 5528, D-6200 Wiesbaden, Federal Republic of Germany. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20864 Little, Roderick J. A. Some statistical analysis issues at the World Fertility Survey. American Statistician, Vol. 42, No. 1, Feb 1988. 31-6 pp. Washington, D.C. In Eng.
"The World Fertility Survey carried out cross-sectional probability surveys of fertility in more than 40 developing countries between 1972 and 1984. Statistical issues in regression analysis of the data are reviewed, including treatment of interactions, the selection of regressor variables, and appropriate linear models for rate variables. Similar issues arise in many other applications of regression to observational data."
Correspondence: R. J. A. Little, Department of Biomathematics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20865 McDevitt, Thomas M. The survey under difficult conditions: population data collection and analysis in Papua New Guinea. HRAFlex Books, Ethnography Series, No. OJ1-006, 1987. xvii, 515 pp. Human Relations Area Files: New Haven, Connecticut. In Eng.
This is a collection of 22 studies by authors from various disciplines on methodological issues associated with data collection and analysis involving surveys taken under difficult conditions. The example of Papua New Guinea is used. Part 1 contains 15 papers dealing with problems related to data collection in Papua New Guinea. Emphasis is placed on types of nonsampling error, including age misstatement and residential classification errors, and the causes of those errors. Part 2 contains 7 papers that attempt to answer questions concerning how the deficiencies in the data collected in Papua New Guinea can be overcome. Among the techniques and models considered are one- and two-parameter model life table systems, model fertility schedules, Brass's childhood and adult mortality estimation techniques, the own-children fertility technique, and the combination of data of multiple types. The complementarity of data collection and data analysis is stressed throughout the collection.
Correspondence: T. M. McDevitt, Training Branch, International Statistical Programs Center, U.S. Bureau of the Census, Washington, D.C. 20233. Location: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center Library.

54:20866 Ndiaye, Salif; Sarr, Ibrahima; Ayad, Mohamed. Demographic and Health Survey in Senegal, 1986. [Enquete Demographique et de Sante au Senegal, 1986.] Mar 1988. xviii, 173 pp. Direction de la Statistique, Division des Enquetes et de la Demographie: Dakar, Senegal; Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS]: Columbia, Maryland. In Fre.
The methodology and main results of the 1986 Demographic and Health Survey of Senegal are presented. The survey was based on a stratified sample of some 5,000 women of reproductive age and 1,000 children aged 6 to 36 months. Sections are included on nuptiality and exposure to risk of pregnancy, fertility, knowledge and use of contraception, fertility preferences, and mortality and health of mother and child.
Correspondence: Direction de la Statistique, Ministere de l'Economie et des Finances, BP 116, Dakar, Senegal. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20867 Ortega, Manuel; Vaessen, Martin. Dissemination and utilization of findings and methodology within countries. In: The World Fertility Survey: an assessment, edited by John Cleland, Chris Scott, and David Whitelegge. 1987. 950-67 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
"This chapter presents the results of a postal survey about the dissemination of National Fertility Survey (NFS) findings in nine countries and the utilization of NFS findings and methodology in 25 countries. The survey was carried out under contract with the WFS." The authors provide a brief general assessment of the survey experience, focusing on benefits, negative effects, and the adequacy of the NFS model for future research projects.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20868 Population Council (New York, New York). Dominican Republic 1986: results from the Demographic and Health Survey. Studies in Family Planning, Vol. 19, No. 2, Mar-Apr 1988. 122-6 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
These are the results of the 1986 "Dominican Republic Demographic and Health Survey (DHS)....Data were collected in a nationally representative survey from 7,155 households and complete interviews were conducted with 7,649 women aged 15-49." Tables and graphs present data on fertility trends and differentials, fertility preferences, contraceptive use and knowledge, nuptiality, postpartum variables, infant mortality trends and differentials, health, and nutritional status.
Correspondence: Population Council, One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20869 United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs (New York, New York). A comparative evaluation of data quality in thirty-eight World Fertility Surveys. No. ST/ESA/SER.R/50/Rev1, 1987. xiv, 463 pp. New York, New York. In Eng.
This is a revised and expanded version of a publication that provides a comparative evaluation of data quality in 38 World Fertility Surveys (WFS), carried out in developing countries between 1974 and 1981. The report describes a series of simple data quality checks that can be used to assess age and date reporting and that involve both internal data comparisons as well as comparisons with other sources of data. "The assessment presented here provides a baseline for comparison when successive surveys are undertaken in all those countries participating in the World Fertility Survey programme whose data are reviewed here." The applicability of the methods outlined here to the assessment of data quality in other countries is evaluated. The results indicate that the WFS estimates of fertility were reasonably reliable in at least 27 of the 38 countries surveyed. "Of the 11 countries for which WFS failed to provide reliable estimates of recent fertility, three (Bangladesh, Indonesia and Pakistan) were the most populous of all 38 countries, and nine had total fertility rates of six or more children."
For the 1983 edition of this publication, see 49:40249.
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20870 Verma, Vijay; Palan, V. T. Contribution to survey capability in developing countries. In: The World Fertility Survey: an assessment, edited by John Cleland, Chris Scott, and David Whitelegge. 1987. 968-85 pp. Oxford University Press: New York, New York/Oxford, England. In Eng.
The authors assess the World Fertility Survey's contribution to the development of survey capability in developing countries. They conclude that "the major limitations of WFS in making a contribution to the enhancement of national survey capability sprang largely from the limited time horizon and rather predetermined content and scope of the programme. These features--dictated in great part by the limited mandate given to the WFS by its donor agencies--precluded much significant contribution to institution building, strengthening survey-taking infrastructural facilities, and long-term formal training of national staff....However, on the whole, the orientation and manner with which WFS implemented national fertility surveys seriously attempted to transcend some of these inherent limitations. The WFS staff, as individuals and as a group, demonstrated a clear commitment to improving survey research methods and supporting the growth of survey capability in developing countries."
Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20871 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Interviewer's manual: for use with model "A" questionnaire for high contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 5, Sep 1987. 74 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This manual is designed to guide interviewers in using the model "A" questionnaire of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for high contraceptive prevalence countries. Following an introduction to the DHS, sections are included on conducting an interview, field procedures, general procedures for completing the questionnaire, the household questionnaire, and the individual questionnaire.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20872 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Interviewer's manual: for use with model "B" questionnaire for low contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 6, Sep 1987. 69 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This manual is designed to guide interviewers in using the model "B" questionnaire of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for low contraceptive prevalence countries. Following an introduction to the DHS, sections are included on conducting an interview, field procedures, general procedures for completing the questionnaire, the household questionnaire, and the individual questionnaire.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20873 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Model "A" questionnaire: with additional health questions and commentary for high contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 3, Sep 1987. x, 61 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This publication contains the model "A" questionnaire of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), designed for use in high contraceptive prevalence countries, with additional health questions. The aims of the questionnaire, which are to obtain information of programmatic and academic interest to family planners, demographers, and health professionals, are discussed. The questionnaire consists of eight sections: respondent's background, reproduction, contraception, health and breast-feeding, marriage, fertility preferences, husband's background and woman's work, and weight and length of children.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20874 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Model "A" questionnaire: with commentary for high contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 1, Sep 1987. x, 57 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This is one in a series providing information on the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), a program of the Institute for Resource Development at Westinghouse. The present publication contains the core version of the DHS model "A" questionnaire, designed for use in high contraceptive prevalence countries. The aims of the questionnaire, which are to obtain information of programmatic and academic interest to family planners, demographers, and health professionals, are discussed. The questionnaire consists of eight sections: respondent's background, reproduction, contraception, health and breast-feeding, marriage, fertility preferences, husband's background and woman's work, and weight and length of children.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20875 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Model "B" questionnaire: with additional health questions and commentary for low contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 4, Sep 1987. x, 55 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This publication contains the model "B" questionnaire of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), designed for use in low contraceptive prevalence countries, with additional health questions. The aims of the questionnaire, which are to obtain information of programmatic and academic interest to family planners, demographers, and health professionals, are discussed. The questionnaire consists of eight sections: respondent's background, reproduction, contraception, health and breast-feeding, marriage, fertility preferences, husband's background and woman's work, and weight and length of children.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20876 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Model "B" questionnaire: with commentary for low contraceptive prevalence countries. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 2, Sep 1987. x, 51 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This is one in a series providing information on the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), a program of the Institute for Resource Development at Westinghouse. The present publication contains the core version of the DHS model "B" questionnaire, designed for use in low contraceptive prevalence countries. The aims of the questionnaire, which are to obtain information of programmatic and academic interest to family planners, demographers, and health professionals, are discussed. The questionnaire consists of eight sections: respondent's background, reproduction, contraception, health and breast-feeding, marriage, fertility preferences, husband's background and woman's work, and weight and length of children.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20877 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Sampling manual. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 8, Nov 1987. 68 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This publication, part of a series containing basic documentation for the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), is concerned with DHS sampling policy. Selected sampling techniques and issues are also discussed.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).

54:20878 Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development. Demographic and Health Surveys [DHS] (Columbia, Maryland). Supervisor's manual: for use with model "A" and "B" questionnaires. DHS Basic Documentation, No. 7, Dec 1987. 59 pp. Columbia, Maryland. In Eng.
This manual is designed for field supervisors using the model "A" and "B" questionnaires of the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). Following an introduction to the DHS, attention is given to preparing for fieldwork, organizing and supervising fieldwork, maintaining fieldwork control sheets, monitoring interviewer performance, and editing questionnaires.
Correspondence: Westinghouse Institute for Resource Development, P.O. Box 866, Columbia, MD 21044. Location: Princeton University Library (SPR).


Copyright © 1988-1996, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.